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Illinois Permit Test is Different from what I studied

Topic 18229 | Page 1

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MB007's Comment
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After a week of day and night studying of the book, this site and the Roehl practice tests, I was literally shocked as I left the state driving test facility. I got stumped with what seemed to be unfamiliar questions that knocked my score on General Knowledge to 73%. Knowing what I saw, I am almost sure I will barely make Combo and Air Brakes if I squeeze past General in my second chance tomorrow.

Now, I'm not saying that I am smart. In fact, after I sat in the parking lot feeling utterly dejected, I recalled similar experiences in school and life. I'm good at being friendly and artistic. But terrible with real-world mechanics, math, etc. However, I wanted to share that some have said on this form that they didn't even need to touch their state CDL rulebook as High Road was sufficient. I can speak for Illinois only: Highroad, company practice tests are not sufficient. You absolutely MUST memorize the rulebook. Also, I discovered from the clerk that I had an obsolete rulebook! So you better make sure the one you have is the latest!

A very sad day for me. But it could be a good lesson for you.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Big Scott's Comment
member avatar

The High Road series uses The Illinois book as it's basis. If you spend more than one week studying that might help you. Take your time and work your way through the High Road Training Program. You may need to go through it more than once. If you do that until you get it drilled into your head, you will pass. There is no math involved. There are plenty of tips on this site for taking the permit test. Just use the search box at the top of this page. Good luck to you.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
MB007's Comment
member avatar

The High Road series uses The Illinois book as it's basis. If you spend more than one week studying that might help you. Take your time and work your way through the High Road Training Program. You may need to go through it more than once. If you do that until you get it drilled into your head, you will pass. There is no math involved. There are plenty of tips on this site for taking the permit test. Just use the search box at the top of this page. Good luck to you.

I keep hitting Report on this forum. Not sure why. Maybe that's part of a reason why I failed the test. confused.gif Please accept my apologies.

Anyway, I do understand there is no math per se. However, there is something about math and its application to other things, thinking processes, etc. Regarding nerves, I was really feeling positive and calm. But when those unknown questions came up, I skipped until I had to answer them.

I had near 100% on the General knowledge at High Road (I could be mixing up High Road with the TruckingTruth CDL study pages). The questions that I missed were not at all covered in High Road or Roehl's test. I could be wrong and I'm not putting down truckingtruth, but I think Illinois has changed things. I get another chance tomorrow, the clerk said. So I'm going to keep studying the rulebook through tomorrow. I'll let you all know what happens.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
MB007's Comment
member avatar

Last comment and I'll shut down my screen: Anyone who belittles bus and truck drivers, calls them "dumb" or "low" level professions, are full of $%#*! A man or woman that can pass that CDL written exam is more intelligent than any so-called professional white collar worker, scholar or student! From this day on, I hold bus and truck drivers up with an extremely high amount of respect!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar

Can you give us a couple of examples of questions you are talking about?

Joseph D.'s Comment
member avatar

I say this with all due respect. I studied mainly from this site and passed the Illinois permit tests (GK, air brakes and combo) first try without issue. But I will say the tests are way out of date compared to what they have you study. Keep studying and you'll pass the tests.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
I can speak for Illinois only: Highroad, company practice tests are not sufficient

You've only completed 12% of the High Road.

But I will say the tests are way out of date compared to what they have you study.

No, they most certainly are not out of date, and who is "they"?

Old School's Comment
member avatar
I keep hitting Report on this forum. Not sure why.

Since you're not sure why, then you really should stop hitting that button! It has a purpose, and you are obviously not understanding it or you would not be hitting it.

If you are actually using the High Road Training Program, which I'm pretty sure you aren't understanding how to use either, you are our very first person who just couldn't get it.

You should not even go back to take that test until you actually figure out how to study by using the High Road Training Program.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
MB007's Comment
member avatar

Regarding the report button, I apologized. I'll apologize again.

I'm looking at the August 2016 Illinois rulebook. Some section numbers are different from High Road.

1.12

Can you give us a couple of examples of questions you are talking about?

I'm looking at the August 2016 Illinois rulebook. Some section numbers are different from High Road.

1.14 Other Offenses Leading to Disqualification (Highroad) 1.12.2 Additional Offenses Leading to Disqualification (Aug. 2016)

The following example is also a different section number (maybe not important). But the penalties for out of service have changed. Here's what I found:

1.14 (a subtopic) A conviction for violation of an out-of-service order results in disqualification for a minimum six months. (Highroad) 1.12.4 Violation of Out-of Service Orders You will lose your CDL: * For at least 90 days if you have committed your first violation of an out of service order * For at least one year if you have committed two violation s of an out of service order in a 10 year period * For at least three years if you have committed three or more violations of an out of service order in a 10 year period (Aug 2016)

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Out-of-Service:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

MB007's Comment
member avatar

I say this with all due respect. I studied mainly from this site and passed the Illinois permit tests (GK, air brakes and combo) first try without issue. But I will say the tests are way out of date compared to what they have you study. Keep studying and you'll pass the tests.

Was your test before August 2016?

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