TruckingTruth logo

Asking to much?

Topic 18295 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Matt 's Comment
member avatar

So I have posted things to this effect a couple times but don't think I worded it properly. I just received my class A cdl permit with doubles and triple ,air brakes,and tanker. I have a two year old son and a baby due in August.I'm looking to drive but I would like to stay local. I know that throws a few flags one being otr companies don't look at that as experience which is ok by me if I do choose to go otr I would go with a trainer or whatever the company required.second is I have no experience which I understand is the biggest issue.I have been contacting companies that I have seen their day cab trucks on the road. I know this isn't the best way to find companies but with so.many different types of loads the internet isnt much help. I'm looking for maximum home time preferably daily out a night or two wouldn't be horrible. I am even considering home on weekends until the baby is born.after searching here extensively I see it can be done just harder to get in and established but I'm not afraid of hard work so I'm running out of places to look or how to look any suggestions?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Johnny 3's Comment
member avatar

Hi Matt,I just got my cdl recently as well through a community college training program. Im actually traveling at the moment to go work for an otr company.

Anyhow,one idea that pops to mind is Fedex...They came to my school to recruit new drivers...If you happen to be in an area close to one of their terminals, this may be an option...

They may also want you to start out as a dockworker for their dock to driver program but it sounded like the turn around time to working as a driver was short if you already have your cdl, at least according to the recruiter that visited my class.

I also know in my area, there are some beverage distributors & towing companies that will hire new cdl holders too.

I hope this helps, good luck!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Matt 's Comment
member avatar

Thanks! I will be checking them out

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Matt whatever you do, please make sure the company you choose will road train you. And not for a day or two, a couple of weeks minimum.

Having the CDL is only the tip of the iceberg and does not give you near the skills or experience needed for solo operation.

Good luck.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Matt 's Comment
member avatar

That's one thing I am looking at also I have heard a couple stories that have just handed them the keys. That is not what I'm looking for. I want the training from someone with experience. I know for a fact I could not hop in a truck and do everything needed without any training.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Fedex wants at least six months driving to go straight into the trucks with a trainer. .and it is usually doubles which is very very dangerous for a new driver. I've been driving since Sept 2015 and I still wouldn't try doubles yet.

You seem to be missing the point of needing OTR experience. ANY reputable local company SHOULD want one year OTR. If not I would be worried about their safety procedures.

The reason has to do with learning the safe handling of the rig. Local and some regional dedicates routes go into such tight spaces that many large carriers will not put newbies into those positions. It isn't some conspiracy to keep you from your family. It is to makensure you and the public..as well as the equipment and freight are safe. There are some walmart parking lots I pass by due to the cars and planters and landscaping. Have you ever been to a Dollar General? I've seen some rigs in there and said WTF? Another reason is insurance costs. Smaller companies hire experienced drivers to keep their insurance premiums down.

So what if you get a local gig and have a really bad accident cause you were not experienced enough to drive that route? Now you could have killed someone and could be going to jail... You could be dead...or you could have permanently damaged your driving career. How will that help your family?

And any company you go to should give you an intense training period. Just having your CDL means nothing. Most people coming into trucking do not last a year. They have high expectations and unrealistic ones.

Yes, you are sort of expecting too much when there are experienced drivers with proven track records who will want those local jobs. You are basically putting demands on a company willing to take the risk to hire an inexperienced driver.

Check out someone like Schneider. I have a friend that drives southeast regional with them and is home weekends. However even she had six months OTR before going there.

I can tell you Prime is out. No local, and the northeast regional is a tough route for a newbie....even if u live there.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

That's one thing I am looking at also I have heard a couple stories that have just handed them the keys. That is not what I'm looking for. I want the training from someone with experience. I know for a fact I could not hop in a truck and do everything needed without any training.

But them is is what many local companies may do cause they expect experienced drivers. So you are kinda limiting yourself.

A year isn't as long as you think.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

G-Town describes the speed bump: you'll need the road experience, but just for long distance driving, but more backing and dock practice, with a one-on-one trainer. But view that as temporary.

Here's a few ideas for local: multi-modal, hauling those containers to and from a rail yard. Large trucking companies have this division, as well as smaller drayage businesses.

Also, look for shuttle work for larger companies. (I'm doing that now.) You usually need to be within commuting distance to a terminal. You take a trailer to some place maybe 200-250 miles away, swap trailers with another driver, and return home.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Matt although my reply was different from Rainy's, I completely agree with her points.

I am on a dedicated account that is notorious for "chewing-up entry level drivers and spitting them out". There was a time when they would hire a driver green, straight off their mentor's truck. Too many mishaps, delivery failures and high turnover; negatively affecting service level agreements (SLA) with Walmart. For the last two years they have required a minimum of 3 months solo, accident free. As a result SLA performance has improved dramatically. Numbers don't usually lie.

Rarely are there shortcuts when learning the ropes.

Matt 's Comment
member avatar

I.understand and I'm not looking to take short cuts by any means. I have found a company locally based that would send me to a local tech school training than train with one of their drivers. Home weekends. After being with that company for 18 months I could get a local position. I was just wondering if there were local companies that did quality training. Or if a mega company had a division of local for new drivers. Which I will look into the multi-modal thank you.

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel

Need help? We have instructions for sharing photos from photo sharing sites



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com/images/header.jpg
Submit
Cancel

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More