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Pre-trip inspection questions

Topic 18306 | Page 1

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John C.'s Comment
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I've been studying the pre-trip inspection blogs and posts. I'm curious how long does it take and how often do you do it? Is everyone as thorough as they would be for the CDL test, every time? Do you maintain a rigid method? It seems a driver could get lazy and skip around, then have it bite them in the a** if they are not diligent.

The pre-inspect seems like real important part of the job. I'm use to protocols, but this is different. In product design we have protocol routines to follow, but making a mistake at this stage of the project is only costs money, but it's not dangerous to other peoples lives.

Thanks!

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Isaac H.'s Comment
member avatar

I do a pretrip everytime I'm about to leave shippers, stops, cons, basically everytime i start rolling onto a highway so that may mean 2, 3, 4 times a day.

I have a my own method. I don't look at anything under the hood because every 60 days the truck goes in for preventative maintenance.

It usually takes a good 10 minutes and i don't mind doing it at all.

Some hack pulled my blue air line just last week that i found on my pretrip.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar
. I don't look at anything under the hood because every 60 days the truck goes in for preventative maintenance.

A lot of things can happen under that hood in 60 days! I'm just sayin'.

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miracleofmagick's Comment
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This right here. You end up in the shop because you didn't check your oil and didn't realize that all of your oil drained out or something and you'll have some explaining to do.

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. I don't look at anything under the hood because every 60 days the truck goes in for preventative maintenance.

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A lot of things can happen under that hood in 60 days! I'm just sayin'.

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Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

I do a pretrip everytime I'm about to leave shippers, stops, cons, basically everytime i start rolling onto a highway so that may mean 2, 3, 4 times a day.

I have a my own method. I don't look at anything under the hood because every 60 days the truck goes in for preventative maintenance.

It usually takes a good 10 minutes and i don't mind doing it at all.

Some hack pulled my blue air line just last week that i found on my pretrip.

Not trying to play "pile on" here - but as others have mentioned...

5 minutes under the hood a couple of times a week even, could identify an issue that could leave you stranded somewhere, waiting for road service and/or stuck in a motel for days waiting for parts.

How much longer could it really take you - to pop the hood? I know we're just looking for obvious stuff that will get us pulled in and possibly put OOS - but not detecting stuff that can be seen with a quickie under-hood inspection, can put you out of business for days.

I know in the case of company drivers - "it ain't my truck, so what do I care" - since they don't have to pay for maintenance. But if you have a truck you like, it runs nice and trouble free - I'd think you'd want to keep it that way...

Rick

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

Apparently, everything to do with the steering controls, oiling, engine cooling, vast majority of the electrical system, air for the brakes and just about anything to do with overall safety of the vehicles we drive, doesn't justify Isaac giving them a quick view as he does his inspection several times a day. Why? Because the "shop" supposedly goes over all those items every two months.

Please feel free to post your route on a daily basis so we can avoid you on the road.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Sambo11513's Comment
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I do a full Pre trip at the start of each duty day. It's also a good idea to do a quick check of your truck each have time you stop,paying special attention to tires.

Jodi 's Comment
member avatar

I do a pretrip every morning before I roll. I open hood and check fluids and give a good look at belts, hoses and make sure there are no obvious leaks. Also you can't really check in side of tires or brakes if you don't open hood. At least once a week I do a good inspection of tractor without trailer on it you can see a lot more on rear of tractor when there's no trailer.no my pretrip are not as detailed as what your taught in school but they are done so I know I am safe and legal every day.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
John C.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the replies! Does anyone log all their inspections, or just when something is amiss?

not4hire's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the replies! Does anyone log all their inspections, or just when something is amiss?

Are you asking about your RODS (driver's log) or the DVIR (inspection report?

If it's the RODS, ask yourself if the act of inspecting the vehicle is on-duty or not. If it's the DVIR, per 396.11(a)(2), you only have to prepare a DVIR for a CMV OTHER THAN a passenger-carrying vehicle if defects are noted.

Company policy may differ in that they want a DVIR prepared regardless.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards
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