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Crst experience and truth

Topic 18753 | Page 3

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Tom H.'s Comment
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Thank you Errol.I basically was referring to g towns post about taking it somewhere else.if you don't agree with what I say that's fine.but my comments are on what happened to me.draw your own conclusions.in regards to the ads it states the gentleman had a 17000 income as a kitchen worker and 10 months later has a 74000 income as an otr driver.if this gentleman is grossing 74000 as a lease operator then he's not making much after expenses.he might as well be a company driver.As one person posted it is misleading.that said all companies stretch the truth to suit themselves.they are in business to make money.so.one has to be wary of their claims.So realistically van company drivers should expect .32 cpm for trucking school graduates and .40 to .50 cpm for experienced drivers.All these companies want cheap labor and then they wonder why they can't keep people in the seats.newbies get your experience and the rewards will come eventually.there are car haulers in my areà grossing 75000.but that's a different animal.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

ChosenOne's Comment
member avatar

I can say that calling around various companies, my first red flag is when I ask the Recruiter to send me a copy of the contract before I would commit. I was surprised the majority would not, but there are some that will. Prime did, as did Wil-Trans , Jim Palmer, and Swift. CRE would not, neither would CRST. Both of them told me I would have an opportunity to read before I signed it onsite. No thanks, I want an opportunity to read it at my leisure, and if needed, have the ability to discuss it with counsel if needed. While your experience may differ, ask your recruiter to send you a copy, they will ask why, all of them, did, but some were more willing than others. If they won't, I would consider other options.

Wil-Trans:

Darrel Wilson bought his first tractor in 1980 at age 20, but, being too young to meet OTR age requirements, he leased the truck out and hired a driver.

Through growth and acquisition, Wil-Trans now employs over 200 drivers, and has a long-standing partnership with Prime, Inc. to haul their refrigerated freight. The family of businesses also includes Jim Palmer Trucking and O & S Trucking.

G-Town's Comment
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Tom wrote:

Thank you Errol.I basically was referring to g towns post about taking it somewhere else.if you don't agree with what I say that's fine.but my comments are on what happened to me.draw your own conclusions.in regards to the ads it states the gentleman had a 17000 income as a kitchen worker and 10 months later has a 74000 income as an otr driver.if this gentleman is grossing 74000 as a lease operator then he's not making much after expenses.he might as well be a company driver.As one person posted it is misleading.that said all companies stretch the truth to suit themselves.they are in business to make money.so.one has to be wary of their claims.So realistically van company drivers should expect .32 cpm for trucking school graduates and .40 to .50 cpm for experienced drivers.All these companies want cheap labor and then they wonder why they can't keep people in the seats.newbies get your experience and the rewards will come eventually.there are car haulers in my areà grossing 75000.but that's a different animal.

Where did i "take it " Tom? Where is "somewhere else?" I called you on passing incomplete information and IMO some embellishments like I would anyone.

A lot of your comments were not about "just" what happened to you. Still aren't. Now it's not just CRST you have issues with; "but all these companies". All these companies as you put it, employ a large majority of the drivers on this forum. Cheap labor? Speak for yourself...

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Tom H.'s Comment
member avatar

G town.what you posted was if I am going to bad mouth my former employers to take it to another forum.i did not bad mouth Schneider or us foods.i stated the facts as it relates to me and crst.I made a mistake working for them.if you don't agree with my viewpoint that's fine.but I don't think it's fair for you to try to silence me or bully me because you don't like my comments.at least Schneider compensated me fairly and had loads.crst it stuck in the Stone age because they are cheap and greedy.They are so cheap they won't even get ez pass.the tolling is built into the price the customer pays.i guess they'll have to pay on the Mass Pike because if you don't have ez pass you pay by plate now.so yes that's a bad mouthing.like I said before people draw your own conclusions.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

G town.what you posted was if I am going to bad mouth my former employers to take it to another forum.i did not bad mouth Schneider or us foods.i stated the facts as it relates to me and crst.I made a mistake working for them.if you don't agree with my viewpoint that's fine.but I don't think it's fair for you to try to silence me or bully me because you don't like my comments.at least Schneider compensated me fairly and had loads.crst it stuck in the Stone age because they are cheap and greedy.They are so cheap they won't even get ez pass.the tolling is built into the price the customer pays.i guess they'll have to pay on the Mass Pike because if you don't have ez pass you pay by plate now.so yes that's a bad mouthing.like I said before people draw your own conclusions.

double-quotes-end.png

Sorry hit send too soon...

Tom you bad mouthed CRST by leaving out relevant facts from their website and claiming false advertising. You then went on to say big companies cannot be trusted and all they want is cheap labor. I disagree with both of those statements.

As far as bullying you...? Not even close. Sorry you feel that way.

My primary point is you didn't research CRST before you committed to them and then basically held them accountable for your decision. You, yourself all but admitted that. That's what Errol read and concluded.

Agree to disagree if you want, but this thread I am done jousting with you.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Tom H.'s Comment
member avatar

So.if crst leaves out relevant facts like how much the training costs are that's OK?They say get paid to train.the recruiters e mail said they would pay for the training.which relevant facts about their ad did I leave out.how does a person earn a 74000 income after 10 months.theyve only completed the contract phase after 10 months.so that's just totally senseless.and if it is a 74000 gross for a lease operator then they are not making much after expenses.Yes I made a mistake.but that doesn't justify the way they operate.good luck to you and to me I could care less cause it all worked out for me in the end because I was smart enough to get out before it was too late.im just warning people stay away from crst.It's all out there.i needed to work and I put my trust in them.big mistake.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
im just warning people stay away from crst

So what do you have to say about all the people who have had great experiences with CRST? What about all the million mile drivers they have, and trainers making $70,000+, and all that? Why were others able to find happiness and success there, but you weren't? If the company was a bad company wouldn't everyone's experiences be universally bad?

See, there are people who understand what it takes to be successful in this industry, and a whole lot who don't. We watch people shoot themselves in the foot and fumble around like drunken idiots making poor choices and burning bridges throughout their rookie year because they didn't do their research before getting into this. So they have the wrong expectations, the wrong approach, and the wrong attitude.

So I don't get this whole idea about "I want to warn people about CRST." CRST has helped a ton of people make a really good living and get their career off to a great start. Why were they able to do it, but you weren't?

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Well, Tom's reply was a barrage of personal insults and conspiracy theories and misinformation, pretty much like everything he has said about every entity he's mentioned from the start, so we'll go ahead and pass on that.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Like I said, there are a lot of people who have no idea what it takes to be successful in this industry. Often times they:

  • Aren't willing to work their way up from the bottom
  • Aren't willing to fulfill their obligations
  • Don't feel they should have to prove themselves in any way
  • Don't know how to get along with people
  • Struggle to come up with creative and effective solutions to challenging problems on the road

So when things don't go their way it's always someone else's fault. And they really believe that, too. It just happens to be the exact opposite of what really happened. I mean, you can argue with em til you're blue in the face if you like, but it never does a bit of good. In the end they never do figure it out.

Vendingdude's Comment
member avatar

Brett said

"If you can find one or two others that are as serious about it as you are then stick with them and work together to help each other get through it. Stay positive, avoid the groups of complainers and crybabies"

This helped me survive school, for sure.

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