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Mike L.'s Comment
member avatar

What's going on everyone. First off im a Former Marine and college graduate. I've worked in the oil fields most my time. Im starting Schneider on Monday. What can I expect career wise from this company? Can I expect the pay the recruiter is telling me about $1200 a week... Also, im doing regional driving and possibly thinking about doing team. How do you find a good team partner through schnider... If the money isn't what they said it would be. I won't even consider this an option and just continue working in the oil fields.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

MC1371's Comment
member avatar

You were a Marine.

I think all recruiters are bred at the same place.

There is some truth there. But whenever it comes to pay read as "Up To". Now that were past the really slow season a good realistic number would be about 850-950 Gross per week.

This is not a slight on Schneider. More of reminding the old adage. "Expect the worst, and youll never be disappointed"

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

ChefsJK's Comment
member avatar

I think with Schnieder you have to find your own person to team with, i think i read that somewhere. But as far as pay wise is concerned i know they told you an average miles per week you should be getting so if you take that and multiply it by the cpm they offered you, you should get a rough idea. They told me it maybe more or less sometimes, but I also am going the otr route so it maybe different for us.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Tom H.'s Comment
member avatar

I worked for Schneider good company.i was solo in heavy haul Northeast regional.i made about 50000 in a year and that included 8000 bonus.my friend still works for them he usually grosses 1100 per week.they also pay a quarterly bonus.i don't know about team drivers but I would hope you would be getting more than solo unless you are new.i know 3 year solo drivers get .45 per mile so you should be able to gross 50000 to 60000 per year after 3 years.obviously newer drivers will not make as much.probably .32 to .36 cpm.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

What's going on everyone. First off im a Former Marine and college graduate. I've worked in the oil fields most my time. Im starting Schneider on Monday. What can I expect career wise from this company? Can I expect the pay the recruiter is telling me about $1200 a week... Also, im doing regional driving and possibly thinking about doing team. How do you find a good team partner through schnider... If the money isn't what they said it would be. I won't even consider this an option and just continue working in the oil fields.

I mean this very respectfully, but you're starting Monday and you're now saying you may not follow through? Maybe I'm misunderstanding and if so I apologize.

I spent two years with Schneider in Van Truckload (dry van). Everything my recruiter promised was my experience. However, $62,000/year ($1200 x 52 weeks) was not promised. Schneider pays different for different positions and maybe yours will pay that.

I was a solo OTR driver getting home twice a month. My first year pay was $40,000 including bonuses. Second year was about $48,000.

I left on good terms and would go back in a heartbeat if I needed to. I had an excellent DBL in Lebanon, TN.

Good luck and thanks for your service.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Victor C. II's Comment
member avatar

Steve L., what happened to you working with Schneider?

Dan67's Comment
member avatar

I just left Schneider and I did not have a good experience with them. I was out of Charlotte, NC. The recruiter told me I'd start at .34cpm, At orientation i was told .32cpm, and when I actually started driving I was forced to take perdiem at .30cpm.. I was only getting 1500 miles a week as SE regional.. I cannot live off $450/wk gross. Not only was my pay low, but the truck was a piece of junk. It only pulled fuel from one side, fuel gauge did not work, air leak from under the cab. (shut down for the night on 125psi and after 10 hour break air was down to 60psi). I complained and complained to my DBL and was constantly calling maintenance and was told next time you get routed back we will look at it.. never happened. So I parked it and took all my stuff out and demanded another tractor as mine was unsafe. They told me I would have to wait a week or two before they could get me another tractor... SO I left them.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Dan older trucks and newer trucks can have issues. I have broke down in a brand new one. Fuel pump went out. It happens. Anything mechanical can break at anytime. The air leak you describe leaves me wondering a bit. You will have some suttle movement which drains the air. Everything is sitting on air bags. I always wake up and have to rebuild air pressure. I don't have a leak, its just the nature of how your equipment is built. Know your equipment and it will serve you well. When I pulled tanks that liquid will move all the time. Once in a high wind area it woke me up. Took me a few minutes to get awake enough to figure it out. The fuel problem you describe is likely the splitter valve went bad. Common easy thing. Just drive it like you have one tank. Also if your trusting a fuel gauge instead of tracking your mileage your flirting with trouble. I always write down my mileage so I don't run out of fuel. I see alot of older trucks on the road, my current one also and they are not all junk. If you learn your equipment well you will save yourself alot of headaches. Just my 2 cents

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Iowastorm5's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

What's going on everyone. First off im a Former Marine and college graduate. I've worked in the oil fields most my time. Im starting Schneider on Monday. What can I expect career wise from this company? Can I expect the pay the recruiter is telling me about $1200 a week... Also, im doing regional driving and possibly thinking about doing team. How do you find a good team partner through schnider... If the money isn't what they said it would be. I won't even consider this an option and just continue working in the oil fields.

double-quotes-end.png

I mean this very respectfully, but you're starting Monday and you're now saying you may not follow through? Maybe I'm misunderstanding and if so I apologize.

I spent two years with Schneider in Van Truckload (dry van). Everything my recruiter promised was my experience. However, $62,000/year ($1200 x 52 weeks) was not promised. Schneider pays different for different positions and maybe yours will pay that.

I was a solo OTR driver getting home twice a month. My first year pay was $40,000 including bonuses. Second year was about $48,000.

I left on good terms and would go back in a heartbeat if I needed to. I had an excellent DBL in Lebanon, TN.

Good luck and thanks for your service.

I have been contacted by the recruiter following submission of my application. I've long considered trucking as a potential career, but only now have decided to attempt to pursue it. With Schneider, the ability to be taken on board with full schooling and be driving within 2 months seems like a good deal. However, I have obviously seen some inconsistencies in what is experienced with starting pay. I wouldn't be arrogant as to expect 50,000 a year in my very first year, but is there any type of driving/contract/way I could offer myself to do in order to avoid only grossing $450/wk like some people say they started at?

If pay is that low even at starting, it would pose a financial risk greater than just sticking with what I'm already doing today at my job.

I don't have a family, girlfriend or boyfriend, and as such would be quite open-minded about scheduling and regions.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Shiva's Comment
member avatar

You were a Marine.

I think all recruiters are bred at the same place.

There is some truth there. But whenever it comes to pay read as "Up To". Now that were past the really slow season a good realistic number would be about 850-950 Gross per week.

This is not a slight on Schneider. More of reminding the old adage. "Expect the worst, and youll never be disappointed"

If it's intermodal , 1100 to 1200 is realistic

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

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