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Richard K.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm in Chicago. About 60 miles from Huntley.

McMahon Dairy Service. It's a small family owned company. We are a contract carrier for Dean Foods. It's a lot of work cause we unload our own trailers. But it's much better then just driving all day in my opinion. How far are you from Huntley?

The Shiva's Comment
member avatar

Keep in mind that "home daily" means your 10 hour break. So you have to park and if lucky have a truck stop near you. Need to wait for someone to get you to go back home...then eat shower and sleep. Included in that ten hours is the travel back to the truck.

Sounds like you'd get a ton of family time, doesn't it?

Another thing, there is only 1 time I had to get rescued. Coming back from Danville, IL I had a tandem tire blow out. I ran out of he's waiting to get tire replaced. Got paid breakdown pay for the entire time I was waiting, up until my feet touched the pavement at the yard after being "rescued ". 99.9% of the time you keep track of your hrs, to make sure you can get back in time. I set my ETA and hrs left , so the planners have an idea of how far they can send me. It is up to me to accept or decline a load. Only 1 time I turned down a load, because I felt I that everything would have to go perfect in order to be back st the yard in. So I didn't want to chance going over my hrs. Most of the time my day is done in 10 to 11 hrs. That's another thing, we go off of our 11 he drive clock, so it helps to keep us from getting into sticky situations

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Shiva, you pointed out just one of the little nuances that makes a local job different than OTR. Most local gigs get the driver back at the origin of departure at the end of the shift or run. If such a driver running a day cab gets caught in weather, has a break down, or has some other unforseen event that requires an overnight stay somewhere, this presents an entirely different set of circumstances compared with the OTR or regional driver that's running a sleeper cab.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Richard K.'s Comment
member avatar

Got an interview at FedEx Freight for the Driver Apprentice position. Anyone know what their interviews are like? What type of questions do they ask? What are they looking for?

Cornelius A.'s Comment
member avatar

From my experience of dealing with them, ALTOM transport is a good outfit for tankers. All their cabs are day cab since they only do regional chicagoland and indiana. But they require at least one year of experience. Its a family run operation and I have noticed that his drivers from talking to them have a lot of loyalty for him. Goodluck

I got an offer from Schneider for an intermodal position at .34cpm. They say that I would average 1700 miles per week.

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You can start out doing regional with Schneider. I would recommend regional intermodal with Schneider. I had a buddy that worked for them. Very good company, very big on safety. I currently work for JB Hunt Intermodal Local. Live the job live intermodal. Never sitting cuz the rail yards are open 24/7. I did otr and hated it, regional was much better, home weekly, local is even better

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I am 57 years old and I am brand new to truck driving. I graduated truck driving school 3/2/17, I have tanker, hazmat , double/triple endorsements and I am looking for the best company in the Chicago or Northwest Indiana area. I would like to retire from the company I decide to start working for. Are there any great companies in this area that hire inexperienced drivers, offer training and have runs close enough to get home daily?

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HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Got an interview at FedEx Freight for the Driver Apprentice position. Anyone know what their interviews are like? What type of questions do they ask? What are they looking for?

We have a driver on here from Fed Ex Freight, maybe if you start a new thread with the title of Fed Ex Freight he might see it and respond. Interviews can differ even among different terminals in the same company - it might depend on the personality of the manager.

FYI, Fed Ex Freight is a good choice. I would recommend Fed Ex Freight over Fed Ex Ground, because Ground is usually contracted out to owner / ops and the drivers are actually considered something like a subcontractor and are required to pay their own taxes.

Fed Ex Freight is a company position where you'll either be a P&D or linehaul driver. I would also recommend inquiring about linehaul. Linehaul pays better and is not as demanding. You'll need to understand the difference between linehaul and P&D to decide what you think would suit you.

Any first trucking job will be something of a baptism by fire, but be aware that P&D can be extra tricky due to the nature of the job. The main issue with going into P&D as a rookie driver is handling all the different scenarios you'll come across while going to customers, all this while still learning the basics of truck driving. You need to be cautious with obstacles and really be careful backing. This is why it is recommended you get some experience before attempting one of these jobs. There are drivers on this forum that didn't fare well when starting out with their first trucking job as a P&D driver. BUT, I know of many drivers at my home terminal that continue to do well as a P&D driver off the street for their first trucking job. Starting out as a P&D driver isn't for everyone, but it's also not something to be scared of. It can be done, but you'll be climbing something of an uphill battle from the start. Just be aware of the challenges, and always be aware of your surroundings.

The Driver Apprentice program is a great way to earn your CDL and stay with your first company as a driver. Fed Ex Freight is a fine LTL trucking company. Sounds like you landed yourself a great opportunity. Congrats.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Richard K.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks 6 string rythm for all your advice! I know I am really blessed to get this opportunity to be hired at FedEx freight right out of truck driver school and I am nervous as hell!!! I really don't want to blow this. I'll let you know how it goes. My interview is 8am tomorrow.

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Got an interview at FedEx Freight for the Driver Apprentice position. Anyone know what their interviews are like? What type of questions do they ask? What are they looking for?

double-quotes-end.png

We have a driver on here from Fed Ex Freight, maybe if you start a new thread with the title of Fed Ex Freight he might see it and respond. Interviews can differ even among different terminals in the same company - it might depend on the personality of the manager.

FYI, Fed Ex Freight is a good choice. I would recommend Fed Ex Freight over Fed Ex Ground, because Ground is usually contracted out to owner / ops and the drivers are actually considered something like a subcontractor and are required to pay their own taxes.

Fed Ex Freight is a company position where you'll either be a P&D or linehaul driver. I would also recommend inquiring about linehaul. Linehaul pays better and is not as demanding. You'll need to understand the difference between linehaul and P&D to decide what you think would suit you.

Any first trucking job will be something of a baptism by fire, but be aware that P&D can be extra tricky due to the nature of the job. The main issue with going into P&D as a rookie driver is handling all the different scenarios you'll come across while going to customers, all this while still learning the basics of truck driving. You need to be cautious with obstacles and really be careful backing. This is why it is recommended you get some experience before attempting one of these jobs. There are drivers on this forum that didn't fare well when starting out with their first trucking job as a P&D driver. BUT, I know of many drivers at my home terminal that continue to do well as a P&D driver off the street for their first trucking job. Starting out as a P&D driver isn't for everyone, but it's also not something to be scared of. It can be done, but you'll be climbing something of an uphill battle from the start. Just be aware of the challenges, and always be aware of your surroundings.

The Driver Apprentice program is a great way to earn your CDL and stay with your first company as a driver. Fed Ex Freight is a fine LTL trucking company. Sounds like you landed yourself a great opportunity. Congrats.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar
My interview is 8am tomorrow.

Congrats! Good luck at O eight hundred. Learn to use the 24 hour clock. You will never hear 8am or 8pm in this business

good-luck.gifsmile.gif

Richard K.'s Comment
member avatar

10-4! I was in the Marine Corp so that won't be hard to get used to smile.gif

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My interview is 8am tomorrow.

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Congrats! Good luck at O eight hundred. Learn to use the 24 hour clock. You will never hear 8am or 8pm in this business

good-luck.gifsmile.gif

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