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The Adventures of Daniel B.

Topic 1881 | Page 33

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Daniel B.'s Comment
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Great diary -- 32 pages of gold. Thanks for all of the hard work you put in ... to document all your hard work, hahaha. I'm planning to start Prime in February 2016 with my partner and was wondering if team-driving means that trip & HoS planning becomes less difficult, or simply different.

Trip planning and HoS are kindergarden easy as a team compared to a solo driver. As a team, there's always one driver that always has hours. However, overall team driving is much more difficult than solo driving.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
J Johns's Comment
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"However, overall team driving is much more difficult than solo driving."

That's interesting. I'd be grateful to hear more when you find time. No rush.

Daniel B.'s Comment
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"However, overall team driving is much more difficult than solo driving."

That's interesting. I'd be grateful to hear more when you find time. No rush.

While trip planning and managing HoS is easier, you aren't ever truly rested. Sleeping in a moving truck is very difficult to say the least. Living with someone else in the space of a walk-in closet is also tough. Team driving is just very exhausting because you're almost always on the move.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Hudsonhawk's Comment
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Ridiculously exhausting

Daniel's Comment
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double-quotes-start.png

"However, overall team driving is much more difficult than solo driving."

That's interesting. I'd be grateful to hear more when you find time. No rush.

double-quotes-end.png

While trip planning and managing HoS is easier, you aren't ever truly rested. Sleeping in a moving truck is very difficult to say the least. Living with someone else in the space of a walk-in closet is also tough. Team driving is just very exhausting because you're almost always on the move.

I tend to sleep 3-5hrs a day (regardless of team driving).

I have had 5 co-drivers so far (including the "Lead" driver). Joseph P. (lead) -- OK guy. Never had any issues. Really fun driving with. Ambrose, L. (1st co) -- OK guy to be friends with; Death sentence with him operating any kind of motor vehicle Dustin (2nd co) -- GREAT guy! Excellent driver. Went on to be a trainer, and now works for U.S. Express Gary M. (3rd co) -- Joke of a person. Terrible at everything I've ever seen in my life. CRST holds onto him for "legal" reasons ("diversity"). Dennis A. (4th co) -- OK person initially. Literally has mental issues. He served in the Air Force, but has no respect for anyone. Terrible at driving. Resistant to learning. Morgan G. (5th co) -- Best ****ing person I've met to date. She's up par with Dustin. She knows what she's doing. No problems backing. Hilarious personality. Takes her job real serious, like myself.

"Trip planning" consists of a GPS for the most part (less than 30s, and you're guaranteed the world's mathematically fastest route 99% of the time). Running out of your HoS? You can... Quite often too! Morgan and I have, in 3 weeks, ran our 70hr clocks down to 2min and 58min (< 1hr to simplify) MULTIPLE times! We tend to run 5,000mi+ per week, EVERY week! Not sure how you got the concept that you don't run out of hours.

Sleeping on a moving vehicle is pretty easy. I have a hard time sleeping when it's NOT moving! The only exception is on I-40 in Arkansas (that road is rough).

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

"However, overall team driving is much more difficult than solo driving."

That's interesting. I'd be grateful to hear more when you find time. No rush.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

While trip planning and managing HoS is easier, you aren't ever truly rested. Sleeping in a moving truck is very difficult to say the least. Living with someone else in the space of a walk-in closet is also tough. Team driving is just very exhausting because you're almost always on the move.

double-quotes-end.png

I tend to sleep 3-5hrs a day (regardless of team driving).

I have had 5 co-drivers so far (including the "Lead" driver). Joseph P. (lead) -- OK guy. Never had any issues. Really fun driving with. Ambrose, L. (1st co) -- OK guy to be friends with; Death sentence with him operating any kind of motor vehicle Dustin (2nd co) -- GREAT guy! Excellent driver. Went on to be a trainer, and now works for U.S. Express Gary M. (3rd co) -- Joke of a person. Terrible at everything I've ever seen in my life. CRST holds onto him for "legal" reasons ("diversity"). Dennis A. (4th co) -- OK person initially. Literally has mental issues. He served in the Air Force, but has no respect for anyone. Terrible at driving. Resistant to learning. Morgan G. (5th co) -- Best ****ing person I've met to date. She's up par with Dustin. She knows what she's doing. No problems backing. Hilarious personality. Takes her job real serious, like myself.

"Trip planning" consists of a GPS for the most part (less than 30s, and you're guaranteed the world's mathematically fastest route 99% of the time). Running out of your HoS? You can... Quite often too! Morgan and I have, in 3 weeks, ran our 70hr clocks down to 2min and 58min (< 1hr to simplify) MULTIPLE times! We tend to run 5,000mi+ per week, EVERY week! Not sure how you got the concept that you don't run out of hours.

Sleeping on a moving vehicle is pretty easy. I have a hard time sleeping when it's NOT moving! The only exception is on I-40 in Arkansas (that road is rough).

I wasn't talking about the 70 hour clock. I was talking about the 14 hour clock primarily. Any driving setup has to put up with that 70 hour clock. But a team never has to worry about the 14 hour clock.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Daniel's Comment
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Primarily dry-van here so.... 14hr clock doesn't really bother me. Even if I were solo.

Kurt's Comment
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lets bump it great thread

Squirrellyguns's Comment
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And I agree, wonderful Thread! Thank you Daniel for taking the time to do what you did for this thread. Here I am reading it in one evening on its 33rd page and over 2 years old and the information is still valuable. And everyone's input has helped me glean a little more information. I have already decided to Drive, and for who I would like to Drive for, now it's just getting my home affairs in order and know that when the time comes hopefully within the next 1-2 months my family will be as prepared as I am for the major change in lifestyle. Again Thanks for the details, it really helps!!

Stacy M-Yellow Wolf's Comment
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Hey guys! I am a farmer in the "changing careers" phase of trucking. Looking at schools and companies, going over the CDL manual and reading everything that I can about the trucking industry. This site is FANTASTIC by the way! Anyway, I am interested in OTR. As a farmer, I never get a day off and I never travel. I am ready to load up and drive! I used to haul show horses. Drove a 5+ton Chevy and pulled a 33' trailer. I loved it. We had a Freightliner and a 50' foot stainless trailer too but I never learned to drive it. I am interested in life on the road for weeks at a time. Do you find time to see any sites while you are out or are you mainly eating/sleeping when you have a break? With the horses, we had very little down time but sometimes got a few hours here and there to take in some sites nearby or a good restaurant. 🐎🐎🐎

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

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