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The Local Thread

Topic 19003 | Page 2

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Auggie69's Comment
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Having one thread for "Local" type jobs is a good idea. You can always put "local", "shuttle" or "home daily" in the search box. But a new driver may not know of the different possibilities that get them home on a daily or near-daily basis.

I've been driving a shuttle job for Swift for about six months now.

My schedule: Show up by 3pm, get my (slip seat) day cab , hook up to the assigned trailer, and drive from Memphis to near St. Louis (256 miles). At a truck stop, I swap trailers with a driver who comes from Kansas City, KS, and we both go back home. The whole trip takes about 12 hours. I drive the same route every day. Another driver thakes "my" day cab and does the same thing the other half of the day.

We are scheduled four days driving, two days off. A six day schedule with a seven day week means my days off are mostly during the week. I get a full weekend, like "normal people", once in about five weeks.

A benefit from Swift: If my trip is cancelled because there's no trailer going, or the weather is bad, I stay home and Swift pays me $100 (about less than half my daily pay.) Think about this: If an OTR driver has an ice storm between them and their destination, they do the best they can, including shutting down until it's safe to drive. On a shuttle route, If there's an ice storm even on my parther's route, we both can stay home, in our own house for the duration. And get paid (a bit) for it.

Many drivers love the shuttle business. It's constant, scheduled, and you get home daily. The downside is the route is the exact same every day. This can lead to boredom. Also, I have joked that although I get home every day (in bed by 3am, and up around 10am), my wife has a "regular" schedule, so although we sleep in the same bed, we never talk (since one of us is sleeping or working when the other gets up/comes home.)

A big requirement is that shuttle drivers need to live near the terminal. In the trucking business, this isn't common. So if you can live near a terminal you may be taken right after completing school (and your training ride) directly into a shuttle assignment. Also, you might want to "volunteer:, and speak up with your DM if you want shuttle driving.

Errol. do you get paid by the hour or miles? What are the benefits like?

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Errol V.'s Comment
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Errol. do you get paid by the hour or miles? What are the benefits like?

All CPM. Company benefits are the same as all the other Swift drivers.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Tinker's Comment
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I think that this thread is a great idea. I am currently in school and am always looking for more information. There are few, but some companies that will hire a recent graduate depending on what school they attended. With that in mind, is there anyone that can provide information on the following companies other than the basic information? I am wanting to know what the work eviroment is like, the general attitude and culture, and of course the pay. Coastal Transport Core-Mark YRC

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Auggie69's Comment
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I started with Fedex Freight almost two years ago. I started with their Driver Apprentice program. All you need is a clean record and background and FXF will teach you to drive and pass your CDL.

Starting pay while in the program is around $18hr then upon graduation around $21hr.

FXF is seniority driven. As a new driver you'll start on the dock, where you will get paid your driver hourly pay, then get called to fill in extra board slots to various locations. Once on the road, you'll get hourly pay and start your per mile pay. Currently at FXF they start you out at $.50mile plus hourly pay for drop and hooks, refueling, etc.

Benefits:

FXF health costs about $8 month for singles for their 70% reimbursement option to $70 month for the 80%. Family coverage is over $200 month.

FXF also offers life insurance for free plus short term and long term disabiliity.

401K benefits :

FedEx will provide Company match on the total of Pre-tax and, if eligible, Catch-up contributions, up to the maximum percentage of eligible earnings as follows: § 100 percent on the first 1 percent of eligible earnings you contribute. § 50 percent on the next 5 percent of eligible earnings you contribute. You are 100 percent vested in any Company match after you have completed one year of service (12 months of employment). You are 100 percent vested immediately in your own contributions.

FXF also contributes to a pension, though it doesn't look to glamorous :)

As new drivers we do:

Intermodal Cover road runs Cover city (P&D) Run the dock

When bids come up your are more than welcome to bid for city runs or road runs but seniority wins out.

There is no union at FXF.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

6 string rhythm's Comment
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I didn't know FXF ran a "hog board." At Old Dominion, if you jump to linehaul after being a city driver, you go to the bottom of the seniority board, but retain your pay rate. That's pretty sweet that you are fully vested after only 1 year for your company match. OD is 5 years to be fully vested for company matching.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
6 string rhythm's Comment
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I think that this thread is a great idea. I am currently in school and am always looking for more information. There are few, but some companies that will hire a recent graduate depending on what school they attended. With that in mind, is there anyone that can provide information on the following companies other than the basic information? I am wanting to know what the work eviroment is like, the general attitude and culture, and of course the pay. Coastal Transport Core-Mark YRC

Tinker, I'd encourage you to be open to as many options that are available to you. You mentioned YRC specifically, but if you're interested in LTL , you'll probably have other options if YRC isn't hiring. Most LTL outfits are about the same. You basically have your union shops and your non-union shops, outside of that, it's pretty much the same. Usually LTL terminals are located in similar areas, e.g. if you have a YRC terminal nearby, you'll likely have FXF, UPSF, Old Dominion, and possibly others depending on your area. Our Old Dominion terminals in the northeast almost always have UPSF, FXF, and YRC terminals nearby, usually within a few miles, sometimes a stone's throw away.

Same with food service. If you're interested in Core-Mark, there are others too.

Being open to as many options as possible can only be better for you. While each terminal will have its own personality and management, the culture of a workplace starts with your own attitude.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

G-Town's Comment
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6-String this thread is a great idea. Seems like it will generate good activity.

Take care and safe travels.

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

6-String this thread is a great idea. Seems like it will generate good activity.

Take care and safe travels.

I hope so. Just trying to pay it forward. This forum was instrumental during our initial phase of researching the trucking industry before my wife and I pulled the trigger. Not everyone wants to go OTR , and some think they have no choice. I'm trying to facilitate an awareness on this forum that there are more opportunities in this industry besides OTR. I think I pretty much exhausted that LTL thread I started about my linehaul job, so I wanted to have a central thread that would encourage other drivers could talk about their respective local gigs, and give prospective (or experienced) drivers more info for their own journey. We'll see how it unravels ...

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
C T.'s Comment
member avatar

How far do you guys drive to and from your terminals every day? I live in no man's land in terms of local work other than farms and chicken houses. Nearest cities to me are about 45 min. Not sure if u would want to do that both ways 5 or 6 times a week. Any input?

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

How far do you guys drive to and from your terminals every day? I live in no man's land in terms of local work other than farms and chicken houses. Nearest cities to me are about 45 min. Not sure if u would want to do that both ways 5 or 6 times a week. Any input?

My work is 12 miles but because I live in overpopulated CA my commute is usually 45 minutes! In your situation I would just make sure that the hours are long enough to make it worth it. No 6 hour shifts, go for 10 minimum then the drive should be worth it in my opinion.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

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