The Local Thread

Topic 19003 | Page 3

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C T.'s Comment
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There's a small place literally across the street from my house but the pay is kind of low (15-17hr). It's tempting but I want to move up the ladder not down.

6 string rhythm's Comment
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I think it depends on you. I know plenty of folks that commute at least 30 minutes each way at my terminal. I know of a few that travel 1 hour each way, every day. Personally, I wouldn't want to drive more than 45 minutes or an hour one way for my job. I currently drive about 25 minutes one way.

Some of our drivers commute an hour or more to work, but then choose to stay out for 4-5 days doing linehaul runs before finishing their work week. These guys are more like regional drivers, and are getting paid well for it.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

C T.'s Comment
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Well there are a few ltl places nearby. Yrc, saia, estes, rl carriers, and a few more I think. I'd definitely do regional if my pay jumped up from what it is now. Home daily would be the best however.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
Shiva's Comment
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I've thought about starting a thread like this for a while now. Frequently enough, people inquire about local driving opportunities. I thought it'd be a good idea to have a general thread about local truck driving to satisfy these questions, and also to show how many different local driving jobs are available. Most folks are inquiring about local driving jobs because they need to be home more ofte

I was recently thinking about starting a thread like this, great minds think a like

I drive local intermodal out of Chicago, local meaning anything in a 200 mile radius or anything that will get me back home in 11 hours driving time. I usually start my day at the rail yards, pick up a load and head to the customer. After I hook to a load, I'll set my ETA(ESTIMATED TIME OF AVAILABILITY). So once I'm done on the 1st load, I have a preplan ready to go, pick up a load nearby to my delivery, pick up that load and head back to a rail yard back in Chicago, then do it again. I do about 3 to 4 loads a day. Depending if any of them are are live loads or drop n hooks. If I don't have enough time to run another load, they'll give me a crosstown, empty move or chassis move. I get paid by the hub mile and for each load, chassis move empty move among other things. I'm home everyday, for more than a 10 hr break as some people think. work 5 days a week off 2days. Pay is great. If I need a day off to go to a family event, I can switch my days.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Thanks Shiva, you are the driver I forgot about that does intermodal. Couldn't remember your name.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Shiva's Comment
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Otr did help me learn slot and eased the transition to local, but otr was not for me. I hated it. Mostly because I was homesick, but also all the sitting around at a truck stop, waiting for a load, spending money. The pay was so so. Otr was just not for me. I know some people love it, but I didn't. I love being home everyday, eating real meals, not truck stop crap or out of a microwave etc. sleeping in my own bed, spending time with my wife and kids. Some people have misperceptions of local. Maybe hearing horror stories from other drivers that tried it and didn't like it. For example traffic congestion or low hourly pay etc. companies pay all sorts of different ways, you have to find what suits you. Also, how many hours your required to work in a day. Remember, you still have to get home. You wouldn't except a load 150 miles round trip, with 3 hrs left on your clock. Also some local companies don't use the DOT clock. So when looking for a local driving job, look for what suits you best

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Matt 's Comment
member avatar

Are most of the local jobs pay by hour or by cpm or both.? If its hours are you still governed by the hos even if you don't have to fill out logs?

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Shiva's Comment
member avatar

Are most of the local jobs pay by hour or by cpm or both.? If its hours are you still governed by the hos even if you don't have to fill out logs?

Depends on the company. I get paid by the hub mile+What is called " activity pay". I also use electronic logs and follow HOS. I have a buddy that drives local gets paid hourly and does electronic logs as well and follows HOS. I have another buddy that gets paid hourly but does not follow HOS. We all drive tractor trailers and pull 53'

Electronic Logs:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Matt 's Comment
member avatar

So as I have been told many times if you Start local many otr outfits will not consider your experience valuable. Will other local companies accept local driving as experience?

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

So as I have been told many times if you Start local many otr outfits will not consider your experience valuable. Will other local companies accept local driving as experience?

True, a lot of truckload companies offering OTR gigs do not accept truck driving experience if it's not OTR. But some are accepting 'tractor trailer' experience. Other sectors in the industry like food service or LTL can be more lenient with job experience. But there's no set answer. I'd say if your goal is to eventually become an OTR driver, going local first might not be doing yourself any favors. Whereas if you wanna go local and stay local, you shouldn't have any trouble having prior job experience recognized.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

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