N00b Questions You (Probably) Have But Were Afraid To Ask!

Topic 19135 | Page 4

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Dan N.'s Comment
member avatar

I never use cruise control. I don't find it tedious at all to keep my foot in it.

You might not be aware of it, but you probably **** off other drivers on a regular basis.

It's very annoying to be driving with your cruise set at 60 and be near someone that's fluctuating between 59 and 61, or thereabout.

Can't understand why anyone would choose not to use the CC on an open highway (barring weather/traffic concerns).

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I never use cruise control. I don't find it tedious at all to keep my foot in it.

double-quotes-end.png

You might not be aware of it, but you probably **** off other drivers on a regular basis.

It's very annoying to be driving with your cruise set at 60 and be near someone that's fluctuating between 59 and 61, or thereabout.

Can't understand why anyone would choose not to use the CC on an open highway (barring weather/traffic concerns).

Trust me Dan, 6-String is very aware of what he is doing.

Besides he drives for Old Dominion...you needn't worry about being held up by him unless he is lugging up a hill. He's likely cruising by you at 65-67.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Dan N.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

I never use cruise control. I don't find it tedious at all to keep my foot in it.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

You might not be aware of it, but you probably **** off other drivers on a regular basis.

It's very annoying to be driving with your cruise set at 60 and be near someone that's fluctuating between 59 and 61, or thereabout.

Can't understand why anyone would choose not to use the CC on an open highway (barring weather/traffic concerns).

double-quotes-end.png

Trust me Dan, 6-String is very aware of what he is doing.

Besides he drives for Old Dominion...you needn't worry about being held up by him unless he is lugging up a hill. He's likely cruising by you at 65-67.

Yeah, in that case (running up against the governor) I understand. I do the same, in fact. I feel a little more in control that way... a little quicker reaction time should I need to slow down fast. But when the speed limit is below 65 I use the CC.

Around here, it seems like those OD guys are set at about 64. Our trucks are set at 65-66 on cruise and that's usually a wee bit faster than the OD guys.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

I never use cruise control. I don't find it tedious at all to keep my foot in it.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

You might not be aware of it, but you probably **** off other drivers on a regular basis.

It's very annoying to be driving with your cruise set at 60 and be near someone that's fluctuating between 59 and 61, or thereabout.

Can't understand why anyone would choose not to use the CC on an open highway (barring weather/traffic concerns).

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Trust me Dan, 6-String is very aware of what he is doing.

Besides he drives for Old Dominion...you needn't worry about being held up by him unless he is lugging up a hill. He's likely cruising by you at 65-67.

double-quotes-end.png

Yeah, in that case (running up against the governor) I understand. I do the same, in fact. I feel a little more in control that way... a little quicker reaction time should I need to slow down fast. But when the speed limit is below 65 I use the CC.

Around here, it seems like those OD guys are set at about 64. Our trucks are set at 65-66 on cruise and that's usually a wee bit faster than the OD guys.

Yes I see OD on 78 constantly...not sure what their "top" is but they make quick work of getting by me when CC is at 62-63. Usually catch on the uphills though...

Good point, in heavy traffic I too cutoff CC, quickens the reaction time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Dan's in control:

I feel a little more in control that way... a little quicker reaction time should I need to slow down fast.

My brain is about to explode: A driver who considers milliseconds important! When the brakes are punched, the cruise control shuts off faster than anything you can do.

Dan N.'s Comment
member avatar

Dan's in control:

double-quotes-start.png

I feel a little more in control that way... a little quicker reaction time should I need to slow down fast.

double-quotes-end.png

My brain is about to explode: A driver who considers milliseconds important! When the brakes are punched, the cruise control shuts off faster than anything you can do.

unless you're driving with your foot on the brake, my way is quicker. As soon as I take my foot off the throttle, the truck starts to slow.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Cruise control in traffic, meaning cars are slower and closer together, varying speed is useless. Adaptive CC is useful in light traffic because it keeps your interval farther back, but usually farther back then you prefer.

Dan N.'s Comment
member avatar

We're talking more than milliseconds and it could certainly make a difference in some situations

Dan N.'s Comment
member avatar

Cruise control in traffic, meaning cars are slower and closer together, varying speed is useless. Adaptive CC is useful in light traffic because it keeps your interval farther back, but usually farther back then you prefer.

I drove one of our newer trucks recently, has adaptive CC. I found it very annoying. That and the lane departure warning. I don't need the truck thinking for me.

Miss Miyoshi's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for all the great replies everyone! I already knew about the alcohol in cab, but thought anyone else who wanted to know but was afraid to ask might be interested. I had that situation come up really early on in my driving and I called my FM to ask permission. She made it clear that both DOT and company policy prohibit it, so I made a note that if I should ever get out that way on my own I would have to look up that cidery again.

The off duty driving was always a bit of a mystery to me. There have been times I was completely out of drive hours, but I had not spent enough time in the sleeper berth at a receiver to recover any hours. So I was forced to drive to a truck stop afterwards since I couldn't complete my rest break on premises. I used off duty driving but our system is set up to "warn" me that I'm driving off duty. Also, because I had another load scheduled after this one (but was 24 hours away) logs called to see what I was up to.

The engine breaks during inclement weather concerns me because as a Prime driver in a speed governed truck the engine brakes automatically kick on if I reach a certain speed. Now, I'm not likely to be going downhill in the pouring rain at 65mph because I'm pretty much a wimp, but sometimes I'm not paying careful attention and suddenly my engine brakes kick on. So I'll brake until I get under the speed to turn them off again.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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