N00b Questions You (Probably) Have But Were Afraid To Ask!

Topic 19135 | Page 5

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Kanelin's Comment
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I run cruise except in (relatively) heavy rain and traffic. With adaptive cruise, when it's engaged and somebody cuts you off to take an offramp it will slam on the brakes. To me not using CC invites problems like blood clots in the legs, esp the right leg. Plus it's just plain uncomfortable. Since I'm old (according to Rainy) and comfort is very important to me.

Tastebuds's Comment
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I never use cruise control. I don't find it tedious at all to keep my foot in it.

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You might not be aware of it, but you probably **** off other drivers on a regular basis.

It's very annoying to be driving with your cruise set at 60 and be near someone that's fluctuating between 59 and 61, or thereabout.

Can't understand why anyone would choose not to use the CC on an open highway (barring weather/traffic concerns).

That explains a lot. *innocently whistles a Dixie tune.*

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Kat's Comment
member avatar

Let's face it: The first year or two of driving professionally can be pretty tough and somewhere along the way you realize you don't actually *know* some fundamental things that you really should know. Either it was a situation that never came up during training, or maybe something you forgot but is now relevant. We all have these questions. I know I do. But after driving for a year or so, we shouldn't have these questions, right?

WRONG!!

Everyone is different, and some things just take a little longer to remember. Or you actually never thought about it before and now you're curious.

I definitely have some questions I'd like to put out for our more experienced drivers that might seem obvious, but to me they're not. I'm asking the questions some of you might not want to ask yourself.

1. Does a bobtail have to go through a mandatory weigh station?

2. We all know we're not supposed to use Jake/engine breaks and/or cruise control during inclement weather because it can cause skidding. How much precipitation is the cutoff? What exactly is going on in the truck that causes the skidding in these circumstances using these tools? (Basically, WHY can't we use these?)

3. What exactly is DEF and will my truck really shut down if it runs out?

4. If Channel 19 is the "general" channel on the CB, what are all the other channels for?

5. If I'm at a truck stop and there is a craft beer or wine that is unique and I want to transport it unopened until I get home, is that legal? If so, what are the rules?

6. What is a parked regen and when will I know if it needs to be done?

7. What are the basic scheduling criteria for general maintenance? For example: How often does the oil need to be changed? How often do I need a tune up? Do they have similar maintenance requirements like a passenger vehicle?

8. Do those little deer whistle things actually work?

9. Will driving while off duty start my drive/14 hour clock? Can I off duty drive if my hours have not yet come back?

10. What exactly is a differential lock? When would I need to turn it on?

11. Why in the world would you want to slide your fifth wheel?

12. 10 speed manual transmissions seem to be the norm. But I've heard of trucks with 13 and 18 gears. What are the extra gears for?

13. When sliding tandems , how important is it to make the weights match the drives? Also, when at weigh stations, are they looking for balance between axles or are they just making sure each axle and the overall truck isn't overweight?

14. When fueling, are both fuel tanks completely separate or can the truck be completely filled using only one pump? (Some really out of the way fuel islands don't always have satellite pumps.)

15. If you lose a light while driving but it will be some miles before you can safely pull over to replace it, can DOT still cite you for it?

Ok. I think that's all I have for now. Please feel free to contribute to this thread!

3. Diesel exhaust fluid....helps catch pollutants before final emission, and YES the truck will shut down if it runs out or even THINKS it is out. I'm currently in the shop because of this issue. Didn't run out but truck thought it was empty.

5. My dispatcher told me that you cannot have alcohol in your truck, even unopened. I asked if I could transport a bottle of wine home.

10. If I am correct, the differential lock splits the power to the drives between both drive axles. It's supposed to be beneficial in slippery conditions. I have only used it twice in the snow.

Sorry if these questions were answered already. Thread is pretty long!

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Miss Miyoshi's Comment
member avatar

The off duty driving thing is still confusing, and the situation that prompted it is happening right now. I've been sitting at a receiver long enough that between here and my shipper plus my drive time, I'm about to run out of hours. But I won't be here long enough for a sleeper reset, and I can't stay here on unloaded. If I run out of hours, can I still ODD to the closest truck stop (about 20 miles from here)? Because I'm in off duty status now and the time is still counting down, will it go into the negative until I change the duty status? Will that negative ticking away put me in violation?

I hate the stupid 14 hour rule.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Miss Miyoshi wrote:

The off duty driving thing is still confusing, and the situation that prompted it is happening right now. I've been sitting at a receiver long enough that between here and my shipper plus my drive time, I'm about to run out of hours. But I won't be here long enough for a sleeper reset, and I can't stay here on unloaded. If I run out of hours, can I still ODD to the closest truck stop (about 20 miles from here)? Because I'm in off duty status now and the time is still counting down, will it go into the negative until I change the duty status? Will that negative ticking away put me in violation?

Hate to be the bearer of bad news MM, but unfortunately "yes" the above scenario is definitely a DOT HOS violation. We have debated this subject to exhaustion and unless you are bobtailing, off-duty driving isn't an acceptable or "legal" log status on a public road. No idea how Prime would handle this, but Swift would probably put a driver on safety-hold until completion of a log class. And this sort of thing is almost always flagged in a daily log audit.

I am no expert on this (cause I never need it), but can't you do a split sleeper with this, 2 hours...? Edit your logs (if you can) back two hours placing yourself in the sleeper. That will buy plenty of time to get to the TS and shutdown.

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Miss Miyoshi's Comment
member avatar

I've done that before, and the problem is I lose out on those two hours of sleep. I have to be at my next shipper by midnight, 60 miles away. I should be in full sleeper by now for my 10 hour for that to even happen. I don't have my bills yet. My FM so far has said I have time, but heneber I've done the split I get stuck in a cycle of all splits, mostly due to the fact I'm running regional and all my runs occur in one drive day. I actually had a near collapse because of how broken up my sleep got after doing it for 4 days straight and had to ask for an entire day to just sleep and reset my internal clock. I get asked why I don't "just sleep" at the customer, but remember that sleep cycle problem I was taking meds for that Prime wanted me to discontinue? I can't just fall asleep at the drop of the hat. It's now noon, and I started my day at 2300 the night before. I'm tired, but I don't know what to do.

Oh, and I don't bother asking any log questions to our logs people because they ALWAYS say you need a logs class and you lose a whole day without pay if you so much as ask a simple question. That's why I have you guys. ;)

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Miss Miyoshi's Comment
member avatar

Also, I thought you had to do the 8 hours first, then take the 2 later. I've never once had any hours come back after only 2 hours in the sleeper.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Miss Miyoshi added this:

Also, I thought you had to do the 8 hours first, then take the 2 later. I've never once had any hours come back after only 2 hours in the sleeper.

I have read more than once on here that the two hours will work. But like I said, I am not the expert on this and I could have it wrong. I have some time to kill, I'll search through some older threads on this and clarify this for you.

Kat's Comment
member avatar

Taking a two and then an eight just pushes your clock forward to the end of the two hour break, but you don't get any time back until you have completed the eight hour sleeper break. You only really see the benefit of it doing rolling splits.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Miss Miyoshi added this:

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Also, I thought you had to do the 8 hours first, then take the 2 later. I've never once had any hours come back after only 2 hours in the sleeper.

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I have read more than once on here that the two hours will work. But like I said, I am not the expert on this and I could have it wrong. I have some time to kill, I'll search through some older threads on this and clarify this for you.

Found it: Split Sleeper HOS Rules

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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