NO HIGH BEAMS!

Topic 19202 | Page 3

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Brett Aquila's Comment
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Perhaps you can use your influence to make driver courtesy part of the established training curriculum. Then everyone will know the "right" way of doing these things.

That's what we're trying to do. That was the point of 6 String posting this topic in the first place. We're trying to teach people the proper way of doing things but guys like you come along and say "Oh baloney. There's nothing wrong with blinding people, and besides, bright lights aren't blinding. Heck, there's a long history of blinding people in trucking so it's ok."

It's not ok. It's lazy and it's inconsiderate. And bright lights obviously blind people.

It's incredible the amount of time I waste arguing over dumb things like this.

" I refuse to flash my marker lights as a thank you."

I never 'thanked' anyone for blinding me, either. And in fact there was no shortage of times I would get on the CB and let em know I didn't appreciate it.

I mean, think about it, if someone was to make a list called "Professional Truck Driver Etiquette" do you think flashing your high beams in someone's mirrors would be on that list? Certainly not.

miracleofmagick's Comment
member avatar

I agree, I'll flash my lights, but not muy high beams to signal them. My truck does have the interrupt four the headlights, but I was recently in a temporary truck that didn't, so I used the headlight switch. Easy. Signaled that it was ok to come over and didn't blind anyone. What a concept!

clawJAMMER's Comment
member avatar

I have NO problem with someone quickly flashing me their high beams once I've passed them. Day or night.

Now if they leave them on for an extended period after I've passed them, yeah, that can be annoying. But a quick flash, no problem.

At least they show some courtesy unlike a majority of the drivers out here nowadays.

Many of them drive with their HIGH BEAMS ON and refuse to dim them.

And add on those lame after-market bumper lights that aren't adjusted properly and it's like a train light at night.

And they don't care either whether you can see or not. As long as they can see that's all that matters to them.

And there's way too many of them drivers out there like that. Inconsiderate.

I quit driving at night as much as I can cause I just to annoyed with all the inconsiderate fools driving with their halogen high beams on and those halogen after market bumper lights that are out of adjustment cause the fool plowed into some snowbank last winter and never bothered to readjust them.

And if/when I do dim MY lights after someone has passed me, it doesn't make any difference because MAYBE 2 or 3 out of 10 of them even have the courtesy to flash me their 'thank you' trailer lights back, and MAYBE 4-5 out of 10 actually use their turn signal, so I pretty much just quit dimming my lights or quickly flashing them anymore once they've passed.

After 2 million miles and the sad state of 'professional' drivers out here anymore, the better days are long gone out here so I don't even bother with the lights anymore.

But I will say if another driver dims his lights or quickly flashes his high beams after I've passed them I will always extend the courtesy and acknowledge them by thanking them with my trailer lights.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Dan N.'s Comment
member avatar

That's what we're trying to do. That was the point of 6 String posting this topic in the first place. We're trying to teach people the proper way of doing things

Lest anyone think I was agreeing with you all on this... I wasn't. I was being facetious.

There is no "right" way. That was my point.

And noone was ever blinded by the reflection of someone's high beam in a mirror 100 feet away. That's pure exageration.

Kurt G.'s Comment
member avatar

Well this thread is "enlightening". Flashing high beams never bothered me, so it never occured to me that it bothered anyone else. Those of you who are bothered by it, i think you should give the rest of us a break and not assume we're stupid or inconsiderate for not realizing it.

The thing that relly bugs me is when someone leaves their work light on. One night i was following a tow truck for miles with basically a spotlight in my eyes. Yes, i did slow down and let him pull ahhead, but the way traffic was it took a while. In any case, that's a mistake so not quite the same thing.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Those of you who are bothered by it, i think you should give the rest of us a break and not assume we're stupid or inconsiderate for not realizing it.

Ok, so you're saying as a grown man you're unaware of the fact that looking straight into high beam headlights would bother someone's eyes? Great. We'll go ahead and pretend we believe that.

Why don't you guys just come out and admit the truth? The one and only reason you flip your brights instead of turning the lights on and off is because you have to reach to the dash for the on/off switch but the brights you can reach from the wheel. Just come out and say it like it is - I don't want to move my arm so I'll blind people instead and then pretend I didn't know better.

It's pathetically lazy and I can't believe I'm hearing grown men claim they didn't know that bright lights would bother someone's eyes. Just pathetic.

Lately we've had people argue that hitting low bridges isn't necessarily the driver's fault, that drinking alcohol everyday after work can be good for a truck driver's health, and now that bright lights straight into someone's eyes shouldn't be a problem.

I'm super impressed with the level of personal responsibility and professionalism I'm hearing from people. My God. Very disheartening to be honest.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

Brights when it is daylight, turn the lights off/on at night. Thing that bothers me and isn't a big deal is when I don't get the thank you flash back afterwards. I hardly pass anyone in this truck so I never get the opportunity to get flashed back over haha.

Kurt G.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Those of you who are bothered by it, i think you should give the rest of us a break and not assume we're stupid or inconsiderate for not realizing it.

double-quotes-end.png

Ok, so you're saying as a grown man you're unaware of the fact that looking straight into high beam headlights would bother someone's eyes? Great. We'll go ahead and pretend we believe that.

Well, like i said above, it didn't occur to me because it doesn't bother me. And i don't seem to be alone in that. I don't really get where you're coming from, to be honest. You seem to be arguing that since it's a problem for you, it must be the same for me, therefore i'm lying about it.

I couldn't help the enlightening pun, but i meant it. I'll use the light switch from now on, now that i realize some people have an issue with it. I never said it shouldn't bother people or that I wouldn't change what I do.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Tim H.'s Comment
member avatar

I learned when otr with my dad when I was a kid that's what you do. A quick click click flash. I had no idea this bothered anyone. Myself I find it very helpful when trying to merge into another lane and never found it to be too bright and figured drivers appreciated it. A lot of the time I don't do it because many trucks merge before I think it's a safe distance sometimes doing it with barely a car or 2 lengths. My first 2 weeks training was in a freightliner. To reach the light switch required leaning up and reaching low under the steering wheel and thought it unsafe. Guess if it bothers people I won't do it anymore. Funny, the cdl manual says not to do this anyway.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

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