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What if I only want to drive locally?

Topic 19216 | Page 3

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Kirk P.'s Comment
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They want reliablility not a liablility.

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Beautiful statement Kirk! - Short and to the point.

I couldn't have said it better myself. Now, forgive my levity, but I will say that I could have spelled it a little better. We are not going to hold that against you though - I loved it!

Oh no! I didn't even notice, usually my autocorrect catches it, it is a little bumpy over here in the passenger seat!

Old School's Comment
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rofl-3.gif It's all good, I shouldn't be talking - I have plenty of misspellings on record in here!

Dan N.'s Comment
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Also bruce, McDonald's is always hiring. You'll be local and home every night.

...and be making more than some OTR drivers smile.gif

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Ryan O.'s Comment
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Well if I do well in school, then I will be starting out with a "Local gig". The company does all the hauling for the company that makes the seats for Subaru (SIA). I will start out with basically shuttling trailers back and forth between the seat plant and SIA which is about 20 minutes apart. It pays about 18 an hour I believe. 5 weeks will be with an experienced driver. They just started their training thing and I will be the second person to have road training with them. However I have to go through school myself and be a free agent. This will all because I am blessed to have a company around here that does that. I looked up all the local driving companies and walked in there and talked to whomever did employment face to face and asked them if they were willing to hire a guy fresh out of school. I made it clear that I was willing to learn and not wasting their time. Few said yes and others said I needed some experence. I chose this company because I have a friend that works there and hear nothing but good things. When I complete one year, I will be able to do a OTR route and choose to be home on the weekends. My experienced advice would be to do what I did and look up all local 'mom and pop' companies and talk to them FACE TO FACE.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Ryan O.'s Comment
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My experienced advice

I ment "unexperenced"

Gladhand's Comment
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You have to eat crap, so later you can eat caviar. People say the problem with my generation is that we want things handed to us. The way you talk sounds like you are young too, sorry to break it to you, but you have to put your time in. The good jobs are given to those who have proven they can do it.

If anything good service and beverage is a good place to start. Linehaul , maybe, depends on location. Where I am at in new mexico, the "prestigioud" driving jobs require a good 3 years of experience and being 25 years of age, I am 22 so I still have a while.

Trucking is tough, don't come in thinking it's easy.

Looks like you don't want our help but I felt it was necessary to say something. Good luck with the search.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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