Are There Companies Out There That Are Totally No Touch Freight

Topic 19405 | Page 2

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Forrest B.'s Comment
member avatar

FMCSA told me that a prosthesis is preffered but not required to return back to driving a rig again. As for getting in the cab that's easy for me. Now jumping in the back of a trailor is definitely a challenge. I've tried for 9 years now to wear a prosthesis but just hasn't worked out for me.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Forrest B.'s Comment
member avatar

My CDLs are still valid. I just have to do a skill performance evaluation after I'm hired. I'm just really trying to make the decision to do it. Ive been going through different scenarios for days now.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Errol V.'s Comment
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Many shippers that ship foodstuff, or paper, and so on require a clean inspection. It's up to you to clean out the trailer.

If a clean trailer is important to the shipper , they often have a special dock just for cleaning & sweeping. True, occasionally you'll have to climb in from the ground, but that's not often.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Vendingdude's Comment
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You have the ability to clamber into a cab (albeit not with a constant three points of contact), couple and uncouple airlines, squat, kneel or crawl to a position to observe fifth wheel jaws locked and slide tandems , balance on one leg or crutch to crank landing gear, perform other pretrip duties including opening and closing hood, right? This is impressive, honestly. Personally, I don't want to see you get discouraged about the potential challenge of entering a trailer from the ground and have that stop you from reliving your trucking dream.

As others have said, a ladder is a solution to get you in the trailer. Again, assuming you are not in a wheelchair or hopping on one foot but use one or two crutches of some type to get around, I think a modified ladder and/or ramp could be your solution. The reefer only option solves getting in for nail removal, and washouts by others vs. sweepouts by you, but not for the potential of needing to strap loads. And as Errol pointed out, you almost always have access to the trailer from dock level.

Is it possible on the RARE circumstance, no matter who you end up driving for and what kind of freight they haul, that you need to enter the trailer you could offer a few dollars for assistance? That's assuming it would even get that far and you didn't have someone volunteer to give you a hand right off the bat. Only the most insensitive bass-turd would take your money just to install a load lock or hold a ladder steady for you. You could be the vehicle for someone to have a Boy Scout moment and to be able to go home that day and tell their family "I just met the most amazing guy today."

By your positive attitude alone I know you can figure this out if you really want to. You sound like a can do guy that might be humble enough to ask for help rather than being bitter and needing to prove to yourself or othets that you're not helpless. My dad was in a wheelchair for a lot of years because of a botched surgery and it took him a long time to undo a lifetime of rugged Independence and accept the kind offerings of family, friends and strangers, but it did happen.

Just don't hire on with a company that does a lot of snow driving! I'm having a tough time picturing you chain up lol, but then again, another opportunity for other truckers to step up their game.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Forrest, There are several dedicated accounts that come to mind that do not require a driver to climb into the trailer. Walmart and Target are the two obvious ones.

I have run Walmart Dedicated for Swift almost five years and can only recall climbing up and into a trailer three times, out of about 1500 loads. Third time was two weeks ago.

A driver accesses a trailer through the Walmart dock 99.99% of the time. Might work much better for you. Even store personnel will clean out the trailers if required by a backhaul vendor.

Search on my name and Walmart if you want more content to read.

Good luck!

Forrest B.'s Comment
member avatar

I get around with crutches 95% of the time. I can do all of those things around the truck that were mentioned no problem. I'm also not against asking anyone for a little help here and there. I have seen some dedicated routes and would love to be on one. I just have to make it through the hiring process and probably a refresher course.

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Big Scott's Comment
member avatar

There is a company in Springfield MO called Double S Trucking or something like that. They are a FedEx contractor and are advertising for driveres. They say 100% no touch. They are looking for people to team. That might work for you. I know nothing about the company, there was a printout for the job at my school today. Good luck.

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar
Forrest, There are several dedicated accounts that come to mind that do not require a driver to climb into the trailer. Walmart and Target are the two obvious ones.

I was going to say the same thing. We had a driver fall out of a Target trailer a few weeks ago and my boss reminded us all we are not supposed to go in the trailers at all, even to sweep them out, for liability reasons. Same with Walmart.

Forrest B.'s Comment
member avatar

What companies pull for target and Walmart so I can check them out.

I know Swift and Schneider.

Patrick C.'s Comment
member avatar

I have seen Crete at Walmart's, I have seen Prime pulling a Walmart Trailer in Kentucky. Your best bet is go to the closest Walmart or Target DC near you then see what companies come in and out pulling that particular stores trailers. I have delivered to Target, Walgreens, and Menards DCs. I have delivered to Menards and now Sams stores.

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