Mentor Problems

Topic 19420 | Page 4

Page 4 of 4 Previous Page Go To Page:
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

OldRookie, a lot of these programs will give anyone who qualifies a chance. Now nearly 25% of new candidates either fail the physical, fail the drug test, break some sort of rules right off the bat after arriving, or get caught lying or withholding information on their applications.

Then you have quite a number of people who are quite obviously not cut out for this profession, or have no intentions of putting in the incredible commitment it takes to become a safe, reliable, and efficient driver over time.

what other training program, school, educational environment, etc. could have that dismal a record and yet continue to operate without being redesigned?

Let me give you a quote from another training program you may have heard of. Let's hear what you have to say about this:

What Are the Odds of Making It Into the Navy SEALs?

The odds of you completing SEAL training are not favorable: 1 in 4. Each year, about 1,000 recruits make it to SEAL training. About 250 complete their training and join approximately 2,000 more active SEALs, who work among nine active duty teams. Some SEAL candidates choose to drop out of the program, and some are forced out. Candidates who fail to complete training are reclassified to other jobs in the Navy.

So only 25% of highly qualified candidates graduate and become SEALs. Would you say the same thing about their failure rate as you did about the truck driving schools:

Well, it seems to me, there are only two possibilities. One... they are not capable of recognizing and correcting the problems, i.e. they are just plain stupid. Or two, the companies believe it makes more business sense to live with the failures, than to make the necessary adjustments to improve the situation.

I guess maybe you should start a trucking company or run the NAVY SEAL program and show people how it's supposed to be done if you feel they're all just plain stupid.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Kat's Comment
member avatar

I don't think the failure rate is due to company training issues. I think many people don't realize how tough this is! I saw people dropping like flies through training and the first year at Prime. It's not Prime's fault they didn't make it. This career is like anything else in life. You get out of it what you put in. Not everyone has the fortitude to stick those hard days out.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Patrick C.'s Comment
member avatar

This job is easy, they need to make it tougher. I think you need people shooting at you while your driving and mortars going off when you are trying to sleep. Liven things up a bit, lol.

In all seriousness though, I agree attrition rate in this industry during training is based on unrealistic expectations and inability of certain individuals to adapt. This profession is not for everyone. I believe there is a reason trucking companies love hiring vets. We have already had our character tested on several occasions.

Paul's Comment
member avatar

My trainer listens to gangster rap, smokes (I'm an ex smoker), cusses like a sailor and often gets belligerent at insignificant things. He talks on his phone. A lot. He's on it right now. And he hates sitting in the passenger seat, so he finds reasons to drive. He's driving right now. But, he is teaching me and I am learning quickly. He's a good driver and a good teacher. I've found that sometimes you just overlook the small stuff in view of the bigger picture. None of that stuff will matter when I'm team driving with him, and it surely won't matter when I'm solo.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
I've found that sometimes you just overlook the small stuff in view of the bigger picture. None of that stuff will matter when I'm team driving with him, and it surely won't matter when I'm solo.

I like that attitude Paul. You're making it work, and to be honest, that is how successful truck drivers get to be the guys at the top. You can throw curve balls at them all day and they still figure out how to knock it out of the park. Keep at it, you're on the right track.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Old Rookie Wrote:

Re Brett's comment above that fewer than half of company-sponsored training program "students" achieve even the minimum amount of success, i.e. only half succeed in getting their CDL... I believe that speaks much more about the quality of the programs than it does about the students. Think about it... what other training program, school, educational environment, etc. could have that dismal a record and yet continue to operate without being redesigned? The simple fact of the matter is either the program's design is seriously flawed, its implementation is horrible and/or the admissions process is admitting people that are not suitable to/for the program. Some percentage of failure is to be expected and is typically, perfectly, acceptable in any endeavor. But, fifty percent!... come now, certainly this industry can do better than that. So... Why don't they? Why hasn't/doesn't the industry correct the situation? Well, it seems to me, there are only two possibilities. One... they are not capable of recognizing and correcting the problems, i.e. they are just plain stupid. Or two, the companies believe it makes more business sense to live with the failures, than to make the necessary adjustments to improve the situation. No one can make the case that the trucking industry's major players are just plain stupid. So, it must be that a simple business decision has been made to accept the status-quo.

That's a mighty interesting observation Old Rookie. A quick story...I worked for many years as a software consultant in the transportation and distribution industry. I recall meeting a new client for the first time who proceeded to tell me he fired the last two consultants assigned to work with him. Being the curious type that I am, I asked him “why”? He said; “Because I am not paying you to tell me I have a problem without compiling and offering at least one plausible solution". So... Oldrookie; how would you solve the problem of “high failure rate” in the trucking schools? Considering the fact you obviously graduated, you certainly know what it takes to pass, thus you also must know why so many people fail and where the instructors or curriculum has failed them…and why not everyone gets a trophy.

While you ponder that question and challenge, I suggest the following paradigm as a basic reason for high failure rates:

1504877947.8916.jpg

Take a real good look at the ten items on the list. Does any of it resonate and align with student failures? My instructor had this written on the board for all of us to read and understand the very first day of class. He proceeded to ask everyone to read it, understand it and if anyone thought they could not handle any of those ten items, to seriously reconsider their decision to be a profession truck driver. Harsh? Blunt? Yes perhaps, but dead nuts accurate. He got everyone's attention with the list, and made several folks very uncomfortable with the fact they might be wasting their time. Unfortunately there is no simple method to determine failure rates based on the above. No test, invasive recruiter interaction, or application question/answer can effectively measure a students ability or lack thereof in regards to the ten items. But they are all very important and necessary to not only succeed in school but to succeed as a professional driver.

Beyond the initial wave of attrition that Brett pointed out,(failed physical, failed drug/alcohol screen); IMO an inability to handle any of the ten "No Talent" items basically explains the vast majority of student failures within the first 5 days of class. About 50% never make it through the first Friday because of the above. Is that an indictment of the school, the incompetence of their instructors? Or a clear testament of the school's decisive ability to quickly weed-out those students not up for the task? I'll go with the latter. I’ll add also an inability to follow basic instructions; like not texting or not taking a cell call while on-duty either in the classroom or in the yard, not falling asleep in class, etc. and/or lack of rudimentary reading comprehension, addition and subtraction skills is another set of reasons for quick failure. These schools are not chartered or responsible to hand-hold anyone unable to handle the 10 items or teach anything we should have learned by the 5th grade. They are there to instruct on the basics of truck driving, enough to pass the CDL tests, nothing more.

It’s entirely up to the student to take their training seriously, treating it as a protracted job interview. Process all information and instruction, study it, and execute, that is the student's job while at school. It's work. I do agree the schools; especially company sponsored are very selective. However they are not there to teach students things they should already know and understand.

I maintain a philosophy that every student driver must “Own Their Training”. "Own It" and you will succeed.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Page 4 of 4 Previous Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Company Trainers Hard Lessons Learned On The Road In Training Reports From CDL Training Truck Driver Safety Truck Driver Training
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More