TruckingTruth logo

New company policy. Does it cross the line?

Topic 19610 | Page 2

Page 2 of 4 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

How many gallons of explosive hazmat gasoline are you hauling?

If you were hauling Orange Juice - I'd think the company would be a little less concerned.

Is it "micro-management"? Sure. How many incidents has the company had recently?

City streets. So you're doing 30 in a 25, and that kid chases the soccer ball out in the street in front of you at the last second. Can you stop without rolling 20K+ gallons of premium gasoline better @ 25 or 30?

I could see it being overly strict - with anything OTHER THAN a highly volatile cargo. Fuel companies have a much higher liability than regular household goods carriers.

So how does the wife feel about you going back to Prime?

Rick

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

So how does the wife feel about you going back to Prime?

Rick

I was gonna say that.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

So how does the wife feel about you going back to Prime?

Rick

double-quotes-end.png

I was gonna say that.

Not a chance.

I am making more money as local without dealing with shippers & receivers on a daily basis plus never, ever being home. By far the worst thing I could do is go back to Prime. I didn't bust my butt for 5 years to take steps back.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

My company is very strict about speeding. They don't micromanage, however they do expect that we don't break the law.

If you receive a ticket for 4 miles or more over the speed limit, you WILL be looking for another job.

Anytime a truck goes 3 miles or more over the speed limit, safety knows. Do they say anything? After 5 miles + you may get a qc message from safety. The concern is that should you be involved in an incident (whether it's your fault or not), should someone get injured a lawyer will go through your truck records with a fine tooth comb and make you look like an aggressive/speeding driver. They'll rip you to shreds.

A speed limit is THE FASTEST you should be driving. I agree with this, and yes, have always adhered to that. Don't like it? Don't get behind me in a reduced speed zone. Incidentally, my driving record shows I'm over speed less than 2/10ths of a percentage point overall, currently shows 0. I will be at the reduced speed by the time the front of my truck reaches the speed limit sign and I do not speed up until AFTER the front of my truck reaches the sign where it increases again. I NEVER use my cruise control either.. just don't care for it.

An observation of mine is these "super governed trucks" set at 62 and below.. those drivers seem to drive their max speed EVERYWHERE they go.. (except some Swift trucks) whether in construction, school zones, it in town lol. Quite frankly, I can drive the speed limit, not risk a ticket or break the law, and STILL make great money. These highly governed trucks may pass me during those times lol, but I guarantee you'll be seeing the right side of my trailer, when it's legal to do so.

The lack of self control simply amazes me. Yes, I'm a stickler for rules, probably because my years of working as a healthcare provider.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Eric G.'s Comment
member avatar

Hmmm this is a good topic. One I am fir safety and generally slow is safe. However i also understand there are certain variables to play here. Coming up on a reduced speed zone. Some of those heads up signs are not far enough in front of the speed change for a 80k pound vehicle and trailer to slow down to; if they are there st all. What if your on a hill?

As long as the company tries to understand the situation I would be fine with this rule. As a new driver I tend to be around 5 under in the city so I'm not slamming on the brakes at any lights. However if they are just treating this as a blanket policy without any regard to the situation then it sux. It punishes the safe drivers who just had a bad day, or it was out if their control.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

To answer your question about going down a hill lol, I'd LOVE to see someone tell a judge.. But your honor.. I was speeding in an 80,000 pound vehicle because I was going down hill!. Yeah, right.

That's one thing I emphasize to my trainees is SPEED CONTROL. I'll simply tell them, "Ya know, I really like you and I'd HATE to see you get a ticket and lose your job.". Too many warnings, and they'll be out of my truck, possibly on the next grey dog home.

My truck does run faster than most West Side trucks, however, for me it's a non-issue, because I simply don't speed or drive constantly pushing against the governor. I have no problem keeping my truck at the posted speed limit​.

Unholychaos's Comment
member avatar

Personally this issue wouldn't concern me because, even when I can go over the speed limit, I tend to obey the speed limit. The only exception to this is in metro areas like chicago where, since nearly everyone ignores the 55mph speed limit, it's safer to go with the flow as much as you can as you are lowering the risk of becoming an obstacle.

However on city streets where stop lights are rampant and love to change on you at the last minute, I tend to go at least 5 under.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Lol chaos.. even in Chicago, I adhere to those 55 mph signs and *gasp* the 50 mph ones in Indianapolis lol. I too was taught (back in the dinosaur age) in driver's education to "go with the flow of traffic". However, as professional drivers.. we know better than to speed, or so I've been told.

I've said it before.. it's common knowledge what my company's trucks are governed at, and I routinely get paced (and trucks who pass me tend to get ticketed)... Especially in DOT heavy truck hating areas , like Indiana. My last time through Indy, I was doing the awful 50 mph while cars are allowed to drive 90 lol.. a truck passed me, probably going all of 53, and they were PULLED over for speeding. Ridiculous, I know, but it is what it is. Unfair but that's what they do there. They target commercial vehicles.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Unholychaos's Comment
member avatar

Lol chaos.. even in Chicago, I adhere to those 55 mph signs and *gasp* the 50 mph ones in Indianapolis lol. I too was taught (back in the dinosaur age) in driver's education to "go with the flow of traffic". However, as professional drivers.. we know better than to speed, or so I've been told.

I've said it before.. it's common knowledge what my company's trucks are governed at, and I routinely get paced (and trucks who pass me tend to get ticketed)... Especially in DOT heavy truck hating areas , like Indiana. My last time through Indy, I was doing the awful 50 mph while cars are allowed to drive 90 lol.. a truck passed me, probably going all of 53, and they were PULLED over for speeding. Ridiculous, I know, but it is what it is. Unfair but that's what they do there. They target commercial vehicles.

It kinda shocks me that a cop would pull over a truck going 3 over than a 4 wheeler going 40 over, but maybe there was another reason. From my experience (which isn't a whole lot so take it with a grain of sand), cops usually don't bother with anyone going 5 over. But usually in those big areas, trucks are going around 65 anyway and since we go slower than them, that makes us less of a target.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

My guess is it is something to do with California .my friend and her hubby teamed for Fedex as owner ops, heard good things of land star and tried for greener pastures. When her hubby got a ticket in California three months landstar caledl them and told them their contract has been canceled for excessive speeding. They didnt even give them time to dispute it in court. I know her hubby and believe her when she says her was doing 75 in a 55 (he drives nights so less traffic)...so I don't know what would have happened with less. Same guy got lots of critical events at prime but wasn't fired. They went back to FedEx who doesn't seem to care lol

California is probably fining the companies for the excessive speed, which would be interesting to find out if that could be true.

Seemed like quite a few companies have the 5mph below the speed limit rule. So if you go 5mph above...then you are technically 10mph over where you should be.

I'd want to know the reprimand. Getting fired for 4mph over the limit ticket is not fair....especially if the driver is good with all else. The cop could be in a bad mood...let someone else go but ticket me. Would I drive for them? If I liked all else. Would I like it and would it be and adjustment are two different things.

I'm still annoyed I can't bobtail out of the terminal as a company driver. Lol so yeah I'd be annoyed.

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Page 2 of 4 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel

Need help? We have instructions for sharing photos from photo sharing sites



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com/images/header.jpg
Submit
Cancel

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More