Seeks HOS Violation Info

Topic 19843 | Page 1

Page 1 of 4 Next Page Go To Page:
Eric G.'s Comment
member avatar

Sooooo today I had my first and hopefully my last HOS violation. I drove us from our last load receiver to the shipper of our new load, that took about 3 hours. Dropped the trailer, and waited in the staging area. I spent about 5 hours in the sleeper, then we were loaded and ready to go. I drove the rest of my 14 not needing to break. Now here is the issue. Trying to find a place to stop as I was running out of time I went over by 2 minutes.

How big of a deal is this?

Fir any Prime drivers that used to train, still train, or anything. I have been told when I upgrade they review my HOS and we don't know what will happen if I have a violation.

Any guidance here would be appreciated.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

It's not a big deal. The problems arise for those who habitually disregard the rules.

An officer having a bad day could still cite you for it though. Don't worry about it, stuff happens. If you didn't already have a parking place planned you should start looking when your clock is down to an hour and a half.

You'll get better at this planning for parking thing as you get more familiar with the various parts of the country and what the parking situations are like in them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Big Scott's Comment
member avatar

My trainer taught me this rule when trip planning. Can drive 550 miles in 12 hrs, WHERE WILL I PARK FOR THE NIGHT. If we have to we reserve a spot. CFI will reimburse for that. Prime may too. Either way that guarantees you a spot. Where we parked last night all rhe spots were full, some people parked where the shouldn't, all the reserved spots were empty.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Swift will allow two HOS violations per month. I found that out after I was called in on violation #3 in one month. I think that's to allow for little ones like Eric's.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Sooooo today I had my first and hopefully my last HOS violation. I drove us from our last load receiver to the shipper of our new load, that took about 3 hours. Dropped the trailer, and waited in the staging area. I spent about 5 hours in the sleeper, then we were loaded and ready to go. I drove the rest of my 14 not needing to break. Now here is the issue. Trying to find a place to stop as I was running out of time I went over by 2 minutes.

How big of a deal is this?

Fir any Prime drivers that used to train, still train, or anything. I have been told when I upgrade they review my HOS and we don't know what will happen if I have a violation.

Any guidance here would be appreciated.

Logs reviews all upgrades and will sit down anyone who looks bad. It is not a reprimand. It is an informational one on one sit down. You aren't in trouble. Sometimes trainers give bad advice or do not explain things properly. Perhaps the student didn't understand and hearing it from logs can help.

We get assigned one point for every violation. So if you drive one hour over or ten minutes over it is one point. The points roll off every six month in a rolling period. So January points will fall off in July. After 20 points you get.pulled into the terminal. After 21 your FM gets reprimanded.

I asked what rookies have in their first six months... The answer was 5 to 10 and they expect you to have issues with time management. Anything under 5 miles they can remove.

For example, you run out of hours at Busch for what what supposed to be a drop and hook. They take five hours to load you. You drive 2.5 miles to the TA and park. Although you violated, call logs who can remove it.

No one is going to say "hey, you can't upgrade" or "you're fired". They might tell the trainer he can't train any longer until he can teach to drive legally.

Did you have time on the load? Was there parking at the shipper? If so, you would have been better doing 8 in the sleeper at the customer instead of 5, then driving out. Since you drove 3 hours to get to the shipper, you would have had 8 hours of drive time after the 8 sleeper.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Eric G.'s Comment
member avatar

No parking at the shipper , we should have time, but if we ran into any issues along the way that would have been lost.

It was my fault I just didn't plan well. Not to throw blame on my trainer, but I felt rushed as we left. We spent maybe 45 minutes to get all of our loaded paperwork and calls done. Including the tandems being slid and everything. So when I went to look at the route out of there and where to stay he made a comment of we need to go, every minute sitting here I am losing time. So I put down my phone and left. I had previously looked at the route out that we took. But I did not look far enough ahead to where I would park.

That's my bad.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

No parking at the shipper , we should have time, but if we ran into any issues along the way that would have been lost.

It was my fault I just didn't plan well. Not to throw blame on my trainer, but I felt rushed as we left. We spent maybe 45 minutes to get all of our loaded paperwork and calls done. Including the tandems being slid and everything. So when I went to look at the route out of there and where to stay he made a comment of we need to go, every minute sitting here I am losing time. So I put down my phone and left. I had previously looked at the route out that we took. But I did not look far enough ahead to where I would park.

That's my bad.

Not only is that part of learning, but its no big deal. Its a good way to learn now to plan for parking. But as a trainer. Yes he probably should have asked you where you were going to park. Live and learn.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Serah D.'s Comment
member avatar

Now imagine a mentor who barely speaks English, who has a problem explaining stuff. I already mentioned this to my coordinator but its like, just deal with it anyhow. I do not know how much I will learn from him. Saw a message on qualcom yesterday about me being nearly in violation re off duty. When I asked to look at the messages he deleted them quick and told me you can only be on off duty a maximum of 2 hrs at a time, true? Not long after I was driving and we entered a weigh station in FL. Guess what, got a citation coz the tandem placing was wrong for the state of FL. Was told it will not impact my DL but I might get points from the company. Explained to my coordinator and he said he will fight off the point for me. Was very frustrated!!

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Eric G.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

No parking at the shipper , we should have time, but if we ran into any issues along the way that would have been lost.

It was my fault I just didn't plan well. Not to throw blame on my trainer, but I felt rushed as we left. We spent maybe 45 minutes to get all of our loaded paperwork and calls done. Including the tandems being slid and everything. So when I went to look at the route out of there and where to stay he made a comment of we need to go, every minute sitting here I am losing time. So I put down my phone and left. I had previously looked at the route out that we took. But I did not look far enough ahead to where I would park.

That's my bad.

double-quotes-end.png

Not only is that part of learning, but its no big deal. Its a good way to learn now to plan for parking. But as a trainer. Yes he probably should have asked you where you were going to park. Live and learn.

Rainy, you would have loved it the other day. We are looking up a washout in Alabama. The one we picked had their pipes backed up. The lady gave me the card fir another of their stops that was on our way, but off of the road we are on a bit. So we decided to hit one on the route we weee going.

I get the directions and in the message it says use this address and gives us an address to use fir the gps. When I go to the nav I go to put the address in and he tells me no, look it up by the code. Well the nav does not find it. Then he makes another of those comments about wasting time. So I look at it on the map and figure I will look fir it when I get to the city.

Well I passed it, he saw it. Did not say a word. I found another washout along the way, not in the network so I paid out if pocket. Then I asked him if he saw it he said yes. However as I rolled passed it he did not say a word. He reimbursed me, but I learned this is how he teaches. Let me fail and just kept pointing it out. No matter that I found a way to fix the situation.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Eric G.'s Comment
member avatar

Ohhh yea and his reasoning to me on why I failed was because I didn't put the address in which I tried to do in the first place and he told me not to. I'm not a mind reader I didn't know he meant for me to do it once the code look up failed.

Page 1 of 4 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More