Western Express Flatbed NE Regional

Topic 20066 | Page 2

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∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
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I'll just add that drywall loads are kind of tricky for rookies. For one thing they are really heavy. The other issue with them is that I never feel they are really secure. I always drive a drywall load with extreme caution, very slow smooth deliberate movement of the truck, kind of like you would do with a tanker. Of course you are not experiencing the sloshing of liquid, but the problem is that you can't tighten the straps down properly without crushing the product.

Maybe it's just me, but my sense of awareness was always on high alert when hauling drywall. I'd take exit ramps really slow and easy, and always be paying close attention to traffic patterns way ahead of me. You don't want to have to make a sudden stop and risk that material shifting.

Thanks for the advice, Old School. thank-you-2.gif

Wouldn't an agle bar, edge protector, or laying some type of plywood on to of the load help to secure it, without eating into the drywall edges? I am guessing that they are already on the load, but i can see how the drywall would be vulnerable to damage, if secured too tight.

btw, my wife has stated the Western Express is HER top choice for me, sooooooo, yup. Gotta keep her happy. smile.gif

Old School's Comment
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Yes, edge protectors are used, but that stuff is just soft. I've hauled plenty of it without issues, but it is just a little different than hauling a load of steel where you can crank the heck out of your winch and feel really confident that it's not going anywhere.

9Ether's Comment
member avatar

I've been on this account for 8 months now. Realistically speaking, most of your loads will not be pretarped USG drywall loads, you'll only pull those loads of you happen to be in the vicinity of a USG plant. They will indeed be poorly tarped/strapped, however, all the other companies tarps are perfectly tarped/strapped. I inquired about this with the USG guys, they hate western express lol....Those loads are super heavy, and aren't going anywhere, even while undertightened, unless you drive like a fool.

You will hardly ever make that 1500 miles a week, or 5 loads. You'll make 4 loads, but to get you home, that 5 load you'll take home and deliver on Monday so it won't be on the next weeks check. When you get close to 1500 miles, they'll slow you down, as to not have to start giving you 51 cent a mile. You really really have to get in good with your DM to make your minimum.

My DM got fired along with a few others that had a pool of names of drivers they didn't care for, in which they had an ongoing bet to see how quickly they can make those drivers quit. The flip side to this, is if you don't complain, don't refuse loads, don't be late on delivery, never ever call him unless the Qualcomm is down, and start the days the very second your clock resets; you'll soon be a top priority and consistently make your minimum and on occasion a little over.

I opted to do the above and grin and bare, and bust ass and it's ok, but definitely not where you want to stay long term if you know you're worth. Starting out expect checks between 600-750 a week. Once you're in a groove, about 850. If you have a DM with integrity, about 950.

Do not...I repeat, do not, come out the gate questioning your DM, or being a high maintenance driver. You're going to get very little sleep, especially when hauling dryway to HD's as that appt is between 1am-4am. You're going to miss meals and showers, you're going to run out of time and not be able to make it home on Friday and your Monday appt will be at 6am while you live 6 hours away so you'll have to leave Sunday evening. It's no cakewalk but it builds character and toughens your skin. Learn northeast traffic patterns, don't be afraid to sleep at the consignee , don't hang at truck stops any longer than necessary, pack your truck with snacks. If your DM asks for a favor IE recovering a trailer, DO IT!

This isn't a rant, just an honest 1st person CURRENT perspective. I came out the gate bustin ass regardless if I was ****ed or not, and you will be ****ed lol....You're a POS to a DM until you prove otherwise and your checks will reflect that, don't be discouraged. He will notice your hard work eventually. Once you meet your 6th month mark, go seek your worth. Other companies are averaging 2400 miles a week in the northeast, getting paid for empty miles, and respect their drivers.

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar
This isn't a rant

Boy, I am sure glad you clarified that for us, cause it was sure starting to sound like one!

You're a POS to a DM
You will hardly ever make that 1500 miles a week
When you get close to 1500 miles, they'll slow you down, as to not have to start giving you 51 cent a mile.
definitely not where you want to stay long term if you know you're worth.
you will be ****ed lol....You're a POS to a DM

I don't know, if it sounds like a rant, if it smells like a rant, I believe it is a rant!

You did say a few good things though, I guess you just had to lace it all together in typical truck driver fashion. I'll let you slide this time, besides it sounds like you are working hard smile.gif

This was the worst comment you made in there...

Once you meet your 6th month mark, go seek your worth.

Just what is your worth? Why don't you stick with what you said about proving your worth with your current DM? I made some really great money at Western Express. I did move on for a better offer, but it was after staying there for a year and a half. I would almost always recommend sticking it out for a minimum of a year wherever you are. You don't really have any "worth" built up or established yet. Having a CDL does not create "worth." Knowing what you are doing is what creates value in a truck driver who is looking for a job. And six months is very little time to lay hold of the concepts for success at this job.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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