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Drivers Are Losing Money By Taking The Wrong Approach - New Article From TruckingTruth

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Brett Aquila's Comment
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Sometimes truck drivers are their own worst enemy, and often times they don't realize it. Why aren't you getting the miles you should be? Why are other drivers getting special favors you're not? Worst of all, you're an experienced driver so why aren't your paychecks up there at the highest level? If you don't take the right approach to your job and the people you're working with you're going to suffer with poor miles and lousy paychecks. It's time to take a step back and figure out where you're going wrong.

This article has some great advice for brand new drivers as well as experienced drivers so check it out!

Drivers Are Losing Money By Taking The Wrong Approach

Old School's Comment
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Great stuff Brett!

I like this approach of drawing your water from the forum's well.

There's a lot of good stuff in there that can be resourced and put together under a particular subject for future visitor's ease of access. It's a great way to bundle up some of the highlights of our discussions, making them easily accessible to those who are inquiring into this career.

With the current bunch of regulars in here, you've got a great "supporting cast" to work with.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
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Thank you!

Yeah, this is an awesome resource, no question about it. Tons of great stories and great advice, and an awesome cast of moderators for sure!

G-Town's Comment
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I absolutely cannot wipe the "cat-that-ate-the-canary" smirk off my face...will likely be there for hours. Brilliant.

Pianoman's Comment
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Brett that was a masterpiece. Seriously, possibly the best article you've written on this site.

Big Scott's Comment
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Brett, that was awesome. I know I did this right. I found this site early on in my research. I lurked for awhile and read your book, Becoming A Truck Driver: The Raw Truth About Truck Driving . Devoured the blogs and read through the Company-Sponsored Training Programs so many times, I practically memorized them. I did the High Road Training Program. Then reset my scores and did it a second time from the top. I watched many YouTube truckers. I talked about it with my wife and other family and friends. My wife was concerned that it would not be what I expected. Well she was right on that. It's way better than I expected. I am proud to be a rookie solo driver. The load I just finished was 1124 miles and now I'm deadheading 1124 miles back to return this trailer. Getting paid for it all. Sure, it's only week three solo, but I've had a couple of tough jobs where I had to break a sweat. But, I am getting paid to drive a nice truck, in this beautiful country, listening to my favorite music. Yes, I still have tons to learn. I have a long way to go in the backing department. I still need to get home someday. While away, I have lost a dear family member, missed my anniversary the other day, and my wife is dealing with health issues. Yet every day, I'm rewarded with breath taking sights. Here is a self portrait.

smile.gif That's about how I feel.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Deadhead:

To drive with an empty trailer. After delivering your load you will deadhead to a shipper to pick up your next load.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Rainy D.'s Comment
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rofl-1.gif

That's great First I laughed.."hey, I said something right" lol

Then you got into the meat and potatoes I was explaining to a newbie the other day. We have the same FM , but the driver is frustrated with his loads. The article is right on point!

To top it off with that terminal rat thread....classic! I think of that thread every time I go in to springfield and hear complaining. Its every where.

Nice job Brett!

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Big Scott's Comment
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I just ignore complaints from other driver and do my own thing.

Ernie S. (AKA Old Salty D's Comment
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I was at our Springfield terminal the other day. I was in to have a couple of minor issues taken care of with my new Pete. I got a load assignment that only went 160 miles for a Saturday afternoon delivery. Here I am at the terminal, it's Friday morning. I talked to my fill in FM (my regular FM was on vacation), and said since I don't deliver until tomorrow (Saturday) let me know if there is anything I can do to keep me busy today. I get a call about an hour later, the yard guys needed some help moving trailers around on the yard. I said sure, I can do that. I ended up making $150 bucks for the day instead of just sitting doing nothing.

As I was in the terminal later, I heard several of our "Terminal Rats" complaining because they didn't have anything to do. I know for a fact that the message asking for help was sent to all the Springfield FM's. So this goes to show you, some folks are just lazy and just want something to complain about instead of doing something about making money. They would rather complain than work. I was told by our driver lineup guys that I was the only driver (L/O or company) that helped out and they really appreciated that I helped out.

Ernie

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Jason R.'s Comment
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Brett wonderful piece. I as well when I got into trucking I read your book and lurked around and followed the advice given to others, it made me a better truck driver in all aspects. Even though I am experienced I still listen to others that may have a better easier and safer way of doing things. Great Work Brett

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