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Need some help figuring this out

Topic 20335 | Page 1

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Shaun C.'s Comment
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I have a load to pick up at 1300 today and can't show up early. Ha e to be there tomorrow at 0800. It is 643 mik es and I can only do 61. How can I do this, is it even possible. Thank you for help.

Lucky Life's Comment
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17 hours to cover about 13 hours of driving, very tight window indeed.

Patrick C.'s Comment
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How far are you from the pick up location? Is the pickup a D/H or a live load? Does the RCVR have parking on site?

Shaun C.'s Comment
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How far are you from the pick up location? Is the pickup a D/H or a live load? Does the RCVR have parking on site?

I am 4.8 miles from my shipper live load and no parking on site. I have ran over several scenarios.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Old School's Comment
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Shaun, with it being a live load at the shipper , I'd say it just can't be done. It's times like this where you need to communicate this problem with your driver manager.

Use the Qualcomm and lay it out clearly so that the problem is obvious. Then request them to have the delivery appointment changed. What I do in this situation is figure out when I can make it happen, and then after laying out the reasons why it can't be done, I let them know when I'm confident it can be done.

It's not your fault if you've been given something that can't be done legally or safely. It is your fault if you don't communicate that effectively.

Every dispatcher I've ever worked with really appreciates this type of communication if given ahead of the time when you are about to start to panic because you can't make it.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Big Scott's Comment
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Sometimes they know it can't be done. They just don't put that in the dispatch. I've had a couple of times where I was pre planed a load that was due to pick up before I delivered the load I was on. I wanted to tell them it's a truck not a time machine. Sometimes the appointment times have big windows. Sometimes they don't have enough trucks in an are to pick up all the loads. Like Old School said, you will not know any of this until you open the communication about it. Good luck.

Shaun C.'s Comment
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I did send a message to my Fm and he said thatnthe time could be adjusted without a problem.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Dan R.'s Comment
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An important take-away here is to remember that appointment times can be adjusted. Whether it's just impossible due to hours, weather, safety, fatigue, whatever it is, the times can be adjusted. Obviously don't do it because you want to stop and take five hours eating and taking a shower while your 14 is ticking away, but if say you're coming into a blizzard 40 miles from your shipper and you have 45 minutes to get there, don't push yourself on account of getting to the appointment on time. The customer might not be happy, your dispatcher might not be happy, but no matter how upset they may seem pales in comparison to how they will be if you run off the road(or, in a less crashtastic situation like the poster is in, don't bother communicating that you'll be late).

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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