TruckingTruth logo

Nosing In. I still just don't get it!

Topic 20352 | Page 2

Page 2 of 3 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Me personally, I think those who nose in are lazy, rude, and inconsiderate.

Most truck spaces are NOT designed for nosing in. It causes the tail end to stick out much farther than a truck would stick out had that driver backed in properly. That extra length hanging out there makes it more difficult for other drivers to get in some parking spaces, which we all can agree are not plentiful enough.

I think the inconsiderate xxxxxxxxx need to stop, because it's not "all about them".

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Kurt G.'s Comment
member avatar

Well, as someone who noses in on occasion, I feel I should defend it. I've posted this all before, but I guess it's one of those topics that gets a new thread periodically.

Anyway, first, I only do it when appropriate, when there's a large open space. That way it's easy to back out, and it's just as easy for someone to back in next to me. I wouldn't even think of doing it in the standard rows of spaces facing each other.

As for why, noise. Just because Patrick knows someone who says it's for quiet then idles all night doesn't mean that that's what everyone does. Also, by parking nose in he could be saving someone else from sleeping next to his idling truck all night.

In response to "it's not all about you", I could say exactly the same thing. It seems to me that the real problem is that some people just don't like anyone to do anything different than they would.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Turtle's Comment
member avatar

I'll add that the flatbeds I pull have axles all the way to the rear, so backing or nosing in makes no difference in how much I stick out. In my experience, 75% of dry vans or reefers never back up all the way to the curb anyway. Not sure why though.

Not that I'm defending nosing in, just saying.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Chris M's Comment
member avatar

I personally have never nosed into a spot. But, I'm not completely against it. I don't know if anyone here follows Trucker Josh on YouTube, but he noses in sometimes. But it is almost always on nights where he's getting parked late, or going to take a 34/36 hour reset. He does it to keep his truck away from loud reefers, or loud apus , or trucks that idle high. That all makes sense to me.

I think like everything else in this industry, there is a right way and wrong way to do it. The ones that aggravate me are the ones that park early in the day, and nose in when the truck stop is emptying, then come 7 or 8 at night when it's busy and filling up, they're having to back out of their spot to leave. That's pretty ridiculous in my opinion.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

APUs:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

Never understood either, but whatever at this point. Did back haul with a walmart reefer and the noise helped me sleep better. Then again I grew up listening to the furnace in my room, so I would have trouble sleeping when we had it off in the summer. I take pride in backing in next to those who nose in just cause I drive a swift truck haha.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
C T.'s Comment
member avatar

I'll say this. If it's in the middle of that 6 or 7 o'clock rush where everybody's like sharks in the water looking for a spot , I'm going in however. Beats being on the shoulder somewhere or in an illegal spot. I've only done it once in a desperate situation last winter but still.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

I'm not very good at backing but if rather back into a spot than have to back out, seems to be a greater risk of backing out into traffic and pedestrians but what do I know I've only been solo for 2 weeks and couldn't back worth a lick at 2 realitvily easy docks today. Lol

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Well like Kurt said, sometimes it is okay. But for those that do it when doing so causes a huge problem for others. . Shame on them. And yup, spread axles it makes no difference, however in my experience it's typically a dry van , car hauler, or reefer driver that does it, hanging out way too far and making it impossible for others to pull out or back into legal parking spaces.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
OtrEscapeArtist's Comment
member avatar

Ain't nosing in essentialy a pull-thru without a back up?...ah, simantics..

I think nose in should be reserved space ($$) with a free lotto scratch ticket for every 10th time.

ChickieMonster's Comment
member avatar

And for gods sakes, if you're gonna be THAT guy who noses in and stays for 10 hours or more,

SHUT YOUR DANG TAIL FINS!

I backed into a spot in Michigan one morning in order to leave very early in the morning. When we got up, someone had nosed in beside us AND LEFT HIS TAIL OPEN! He did have a wide open lot to back into, true, but if I would had needed to turn right to get fuel, I would have had a heck of a time getting around him without taking it off.

Page 2 of 3 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel

Need help? We have instructions for sharing photos from photo sharing sites



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com/images/header.jpg
Submit
Cancel

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More