I shut down and ruined my service record due to fatigue!

Topic 20369 | Page 1

Page 1 of 5 Next Page Go To Page:
Werner N.'s Comment
member avatar

Yes I risked my job when I could have easily pushed myself , but if I ever feel I'm truly unsafe to drive I won't.

I got my 8 hours, had my coffee, had my breakfast yet I just felt tired and upset and found my mind drifting well driving , so I said screw this load I'm not driving !

Sure I'm afraid of being fired now, not because I refused to drive illegally but because I didn't make delv time.

Anyhow the point of this word salad is, always risk your job and not others lifes.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
I got my 8 hours, had my coffee, had my breakfast yet I just felt tired and upset and found my mind drifting well driving , so I said screw this load I'm not driving!

Werner, there is a huge difference in feeling a bit lazy, and irritable than truly being tired and fatigued. You clearly got enough rest to be safe if you got eight hours, as you stated. I'm not convinced you were going to be risking other's lives.

Anyhow the point of this word salad is, always risk your job and not others lifes.

Taken at face value that sounds like a fair enough statement, but in the context that you used it I'm concerned you are starting to sound a bit like the infamous whining truck driver "Abe" on YouTube.

There are times when a professional driver maybe doesn't really "feel" like driving, but the professional in him just pushes through that and he "gits er done." He would never take the attitude that says...

screw this load I'm not driving !
Matthew K.'s Comment
member avatar

I would much rather be late for an appointment than kill someone because I'm driving well past my hours.

Sounds to me like a good decision on your part, I'm sure you can find an employer that understands.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

I missed this part...

Yes I risked my job when I could have easily pushed myself

You even admitted that you could have "easily" gotten this done!

I'm not sure what to think about this, but I wanted to speak up because I don't think this is very good advice. If you can "easily" push yourself then you should. If you are truly struggling, then that is a different matter. You framed this whole thing in a way that just sounds like you got a little lazy, and then tried to justify it with some sort of lip service concerning safety. That is not a good way to go about proving your trustworthiness to your dispatcher. Nor is it a good way to counsel new drivers attempting to make a good start in trucking.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Old School's Comment
member avatar
Sure I'm afraid of being fired now, not because I refused to drive illegally but because I didn't make delv time

This just gets richer! The problem is not that you "didn't" make your delivery time. The problem is that you "refused" to make it, even after getting eight hours of rest!

Werner N.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Sure I'm afraid of being fired now, not because I refused to drive illegally but because I didn't make delv time

double-quotes-end.png

This just gets richer! The problem is not that you "didn't" make your delivery time. The problem is that you "refused" to make it, even after getting eight hours of rest!

Are you a dispatcher ? Fact is if you push yourself or ever put this job before your own personal health or well being , you are the reason we need more regulations in this industry .

The fact that you're trying to make me come off as irrtabile and lazy really shows me that you are no professional driver , a driver must be fully alert when driving and always planning 13 sec ahead. You know how often I checked my passagenger mirror before I shut down? I couldn't even tell you it was that low, but I would easily say less than 120 times an hour .

Pushing yourself when you know you are not driving in a safe manner is never good , and anyone who does it should have their drivers license and not just cdl taken away.

So I shut down for a 2 hour nap, try and make me out as a villain all you want. You're just showing your true colors .

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

I'm 100% on Old School's side here. You are pulling an "Abe" - you had plenty of rest but didn't feel like driving so you decided to park it and play the safety card. That's just soft and lazy is what that is. You're no safer than anyone else. You're just lazier.

And trying to say Old School isn't safe or isn't a professional makes you look ten times as bad. That man has run huge miles with a flawless safety and service record in an elite division for years now. He is the epitome of a Top Tier Driver, the true professional that all drivers should strive to be.

I got my 8 hours, had my coffee, had my breakfast yet I just felt tired and upset and found my mind drifting well driving , so I said screw this load I'm not driving !

Those are not the words of a Top Tier Professional in this business. That's just soft and lazy. You might fool a journalist looking for a good story, but you're talking to seasoned pros here. I drove for 15 years at the highest level with a flawless safety record and virtually flawless service record. I turned huge miles throughout my entire career. Do you know how many thousands of times I felt like saying "screw it" and just going to bed or watching a movie? No one feels like doing their job all the time.

Don't play the safety card on us. You ain't foolin us in the least. You're looking to be commended for being lazy. Go to the "other forum" and you'll find plenty of people who will take your side and cry with you about the "Nazi Dispatchers" and how guys like Old School don't care about safety. That's the oldest copout in the book. Go to any playground and you'll see a bunch of do-nothings on the sidelines pretending they don't want to be like the superstars doing it for real on the battlefield. They condemn and criticize those with awesome performance records to cover up for their own failures.

There's a big difference between Top Tier Professionals and the average everyday knuckleheads. Thanks for demonstrating that.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
you are the reason we need more regulations in this industry

And by the way, guys like you are the reason companies pay by the mile, not by the hour or by the day. Because in the end they need people who are going to work hard and get the job done safely and reliably, not guys who are gonna quit whenever they feel like it and play the safety card.

Come on, man. You must have forgotten where you were. You're in the wrong forum. Go make a YouTube video chastising the trucking industry and your dispatcher why don't you?

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
The fact that you're trying to make me come off as irritability and lazy really shows me that you are no professional driver

And of course this is classic because as I've stated, Old School is the epitome of a professional driver. They don't come any better.

Back in the day they used to say, "If you can't run with the big dogs, stay on the porch" ......and I would add "and criticize the big dogs, pretending you choose not to be one because you care too much about safety"

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

ACO476's Comment
member avatar

I got my 8 hours...

I wish I could get 8 hours a night...

Page 1 of 5 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel

Need help? We have instructions for sharing photos from photo sharing sites



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com/images/header.jpg
Submit
Cancel

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More