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I just don't get some people

Topic 20385 | Page 2

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Pianoman's Comment
member avatar
In fact, I found that tarping alwayd went a lot faster if I cussed under my breath a little bit. fact, I found that tarping alwayd went a lot faster if I cussed under my breath a little bit.

rofl-3.gif

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Eric wrote:

Well not all guys complaining are negative Nancy's. I have been solo for about 8 weeks now, company reefer driver. I have had maybe 3 weeks over 2400 miles.

In fact a rookie driver in my orientation class went lease. He has just as much driving experience as me. He makes in 2 weeks what I hope to make in a month.

No comparison between your paycheck and his...except for the bank it's drawn on, none.

It's really unfortunate, not for you, but for him. Unconscionable how these big companies lure in unsuspecting young rookies with only a few weeks of experience to sign-on with a lease. Talk to him again in about 9 months. Madness... Eric you might want to read some of the threads contained in this link before developing a false sense of reality on the fortunes you are missing out on:

Leasing

As far as you mileage...8 weeks isn't very long. You are barely on the planners radar yet. Make it a point to have regular communication with your fleet manager/driver manager about your progress, that you are confident you are ready to do more. Ask him or her what else you need to do to improve, etc. Don't wait for something to happen...reach out to them, make yourself visible. I also suggest searching on Rainy and Old School (search bar in the upper left hand corner), the reigning King and Queen of effective clock management and planning. Your learning curve, has just begun. What you are experiencing is part of it and normal.

Good luck!

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

Turtle let me tell you, I have had dry van guys complain about having to put in straps or load locks... It's crazy how much people focus on little things. Leads to wasted time and unneeded stress.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Thought of this thread today. I'm reefer and obviously know nothing of tarping. But a flatbed in front of me was hauling wood slats that were strapped and not tarped....

Anyone want to guess how many chopsticks I created when those suckers flew out at me and I crunched over them???

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bill F.'s Comment
member avatar

This thread made me think of a question for you flat bedders. If you are delivering a load of tarps, do you have to tarp them?

as Curly often said:"nyuk nyuk nyuk."

Big T's Comment
member avatar

Does Prime not do relays or allow you to call the customer? With that scenario I would pick up and get as close as possible. Monday morning I would be on the phone with the customer to try and get an earlier appt. Worse case they say no and you deliver Wed. It shows your planner and your DM you can run and they can give you more miles or tighter runs.

Well not all guys complaining are negative Nancy's. I have been solo for about 8 weeks now, company reefer driver. I have had maybe 3 weeks over 2400 miles.

In fact a rookie driver in my orientation class went lease. He has just as much driving experience as me. He makes in 2 weeks what I hope to make in a month.

It is frustrating, and I wa out 6 weeks straight. I only went into the terminal because my APU is having issues. So since they took me to the SLC one where my car is. I decided to get lots of outside the truck things done. So it ended p being home time.

Went back out and I'm back at a prime terminal waiting fir my APU to be fixed again.

I didn't get paid for any of the other days my truck was in the shop. I hope I get paid for this time. I'll be at Sprimo through Sat.

I have enjoyed Prime and the experiences, but the miles promised have not been delivered. In fact my pay today was negative 201 dollars. As soon as I leave they give me a load Sat night last week. 1700+ miles. I'm super excited. However it delivers on Wednesday. So no loads for last week at all. Frown face...

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

A senior linehaul driver at my terminal complained to me about having to back his lead pup to a door at the destination terminal on his run. He couldn't just drop the whole set instead. They wanted him to break his set and back the freak'n lead trailer to a door!!!! The tyranny! And this senior driver was getting over 100k a year on that particular run. Yet ... couldn't ... be bothered with .... backing a freak'n trailer .... to a door. So, he jumped off the run.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Eric

Prime pays breakdown pay and for a hotel. You need to talk to your FM and get paid. Freight has been slow and many drivers are complaining of lower than normal.miles but that is trucking. It's picking back up now and soon you will be running so hard you have to ask for time to shower and eat lol.

I joked about this with my greedy FM after Penny and I decided to stay teaming together. I know he will run us really hard to tge point of insaniry. He replied "fine..I'll give u shower time when the customers call about your smell" lol IT WAS A JOkE.. Love that man

Eric have you asked for more miles? How do you feel about trip planning and time managent?

I thought I screwed up on a CA load but we got there an hour before the appt. That was TOO close for comfort for me lol I have to be there hours and hours ahead of time not to worry

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Eric G.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you fir the advice. I have been planning to talk to him about the miles. I was just letting a few months go by. Kind of treating it as paying my dues showing him I can do it.

I have reached out to him as far as my performance and he said no issues that he sees.

Eric wrote:

double-quotes-start.png

Well not all guys complaining are negative Nancy's. I have been solo for about 8 weeks now, company reefer driver. I have had maybe 3 weeks over 2400 miles.

In fact a rookie driver in my orientation class went lease. He has just as much driving experience as me. He makes in 2 weeks what I hope to make in a month.

double-quotes-end.png

No comparison between your paycheck and his...except for the bank it's drawn on, none.

It's really unfortunate, not for you, but for him. Unconscionable how these big companies lure in unsuspecting young rookies with only a few weeks of experience to sign-on with a lease. Talk to him again in about 9 months. Madness... Eric you might want to read some of the threads contained in this link before developing a false sense of reality on the fortunes you are missing out on:

Leasing

As far as you mileage...8 weeks isn't very long. You are barely on the planners radar yet. Make it a point to have regular communication with your fleet manager/driver manager about your progress, that you are confident you are ready to do more. Ask him or her what else you need to do to improve, etc. Don't wait for something to happen...reach out to them, make yourself visible. I also suggest searching on Rainy and Old School (search bar in the upper left hand corner), the reigning King and Queen of effective clock management and planning. Your learning curve, has just begun. What you are experiencing is part of it and normal.

Good luck!

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Eric G.'s Comment
member avatar

As far as I know, I only call the shipper/receiver to get directions to their location; when Primes directions aren't clear.

The rest of the time I have to go through my FM.

Does Prime not do relays or allow you to call the customer? With that scenario I would pick up and get as close as possible. Monday morning I would be on the phone with the customer to try and get an earlier appt. Worse case they say no and you deliver Wed. It shows your planner and your DM you can run and they can give you more miles or tighter runs.

double-quotes-start.png

Well not all guys complaining are negative Nancy's. I have been solo for about 8 weeks now, company reefer driver. I have had maybe 3 weeks over 2400 miles.

In fact a rookie driver in my orientation class went lease. He has just as much driving experience as me. He makes in 2 weeks what I hope to make in a month.

It is frustrating, and I wa out 6 weeks straight. I only went into the terminal because my APU is having issues. So since they took me to the SLC one where my car is. I decided to get lots of outside the truck things done. So it ended p being home time.

Went back out and I'm back at a prime terminal waiting fir my APU to be fixed again.

I didn't get paid for any of the other days my truck was in the shop. I hope I get paid for this time. I'll be at Sprimo through Sat.

I have enjoyed Prime and the experiences, but the miles promised have not been delivered. In fact my pay today was negative 201 dollars. As soon as I leave they give me a load Sat night last week. 1700+ miles. I'm super excited. However it delivers on Wednesday. So no loads for last week at all. Frown face...

double-quotes-end.png

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

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