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Could use some advice about a couple potential job offers I have

Topic 20387 | Page 2

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Pianoman's Comment
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I'm scratching my head over your response to the LTL suggestion. You already said you don't mind nights. You are aware that the extraboard is possibly something you'll have to put up with at one of the two jobs you did list. And you mentioned being a diabetic and hard physical labor. I remember you mentioning health issues before, months ago.

You want to make more money. You want to be home more. Why in the world wouldn't you be interested in LTL? To me, that's exactly what you're describing when talking about your wants. And why do all the hard labor of food service when you can run linehaul and make even more money?

6 String, perhaps I should take another look at it, but I don't think it's really a good fit right now. There's some really good money to be made in linehaul but I think I would I would want to shoot myself after about six months of the same monotony. I think I'd love P&D , but I'm concerned about the diabetes. It's not that I can't do the job, but there are very strict regulations I have to follow concerning the diabetes and I know they would be much more difficult to adhere to in that type of job.

Don't get me wrong--I can, have, and will do any job to support myself and my family--but it's a driver's market. I'm ok with making a little less money if I love the job and I have enough flexibility to ensure I'm following all these regs.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

6 string rhythm's Comment
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I can appreciate your response. Monotony is certainly a major part of linehaul. Some embrace it. Others not so much.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Pianoman's Comment
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Thanks for the advice, everyone. I’ve decided to go with American Furniture Warehouse. I was going to wait around and see if something better popped up, but I decided to just go ahead with these guys because I was stressing way too much about all this and I really don’t want to wait another six months to get rid of one of my cars. I’m not very good at making decisions like this, so every time a company made me an offer I’d go a little nuts even if it wasn’t a very good offer. I’m sure if I’d waited around I could’ve found something better paying, but this gig is also pretty much exactly what I was looking for:

- Gone for a week at a time

- Beautiful equipment, well maintained, with a few extra creature comforts

- Great pay

- Reasonable weekly mileage

- “Chill” work environment (hopefully—that remains to be seen)

I’m sure there are greener pastures, but I don’t need the greenest pasture in the world. A good solid job working for good people works for me—and I’m thrilled. Besides, I don’t really plan on being in this profession for an incredibly long time anyway. Part of the reason I want to go back on the road is so I can focus more on teaching myself IT/computer programming without all the distractions at home.

Anyhow, I’m super excited and can’t wait to get out there and start driving for them. I officially put in my two weeks with Swift yesterday—my last day will be Friday the 25th and I’ll start with AFW on Monday the 28th. I wasn’t originally planning on going back on the road until at least January so I have a lot to get ready in the next couple weeks.

I’ll post a new thread when I get started with them.

G-Town's Comment
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Good for you Pianoman. Well thought decision, I am sure I am not alone in wishing you "all the best" with this new endeavor.

Errol V.'s Comment
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This goes for anybody in a situation similar to Pianoman (The current gig just isn't getting me the time/miles/whatever I was hoping for).

If you want to leave on good terms, and you might be open to stick with your current company, the best thing you can do is have a sit-down with your Fleet Manager. Your FM certainly does not want to let a good driver go (and you know you are in the top 5%, right?). Discuss what you are looking for, listen to your FM's answer. You may be surprised.

Then, if you still want to leave the fold, smile, shake hands and say thanks anyway. Chances are you will have an "OK to rehire" in your record.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

Good for you Pianoman. Well thought decision, I am sure I am not alone in wishing you "all the best" with this new endeavor.

Thanks G, I'm looking forward to it. I appreciate your advice the other day as well.

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar
If you want to leave on good terms, and you might be open to stick with your current company, the best thing you can do is have a sit-down with your Fleet Manager.

Excellent advice Errol. I did this a couple months ago and I've known others who did this--it makes a big difference. Unfortunately there's not alot my fleet manager could do in this case, but she has made it very clear that I'm welcome back if things don't work out at AFW. This is actually the only time I've ever left a job with such an open invitation to return--feels good.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Cornelius A.'s Comment
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Good luck Pianoman, I checked their CSA scores and they are amazing and I also checked their CAB report which gives you a historical of a company from the day they started till where they are today and that was one of the cleanness I have seen..... thhe few violations they have you can tell come from some knuckle head drivers that did no do a proper pre trip such as inoperable lamp and stuff.... having an idea about your work ethic and thoroughness, I am sure you will be a superstar there..... congrats and good luck

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

Good luck Pianoman, I checked their CSA scores and they are amazing and I also checked their CAB report which gives you a historical of a company from the day they started till where they are today and that was one of the cleanness I have seen..... thhe few violations they have you can tell come from some knuckle head drivers that did no do a proper pre trip such as inoperable lamp and stuff.... having an idea about your work ethic and thoroughness, I am sure you will be a superstar there..... congrats and good luck

Thanks Cornelius. Yeah they're really proud of their CSA score, which is why they have all their new hires pass a pretrip test in addition to a road test. I actually learned a couple things on the road test as well.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

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