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Tried rolling 70

Topic 20399 | Page 1

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Kevin J.'s Comment
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I'm on my right day and my 70 ran out any suggestions as to what I should do now as I am under a load now. I do have hours to be gained. How can I get those hours back or a new 70? Any help would be greatly appreciated !!!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Hey Kevin, this is an important question that all drivers need to know the answer to. The way you can get a fresh new 70 hour clock is to take a 34 hour break. After 34 hours of off duty time your 70 hour clock will re-set itself. I don't recommend you do that option while under a load, unless you have your dispatcher's approval.

When using your re-cap hours, or as some refer to it, your "rolling 70," you have got to wait until midnight for those hours to come available.

Either way you choose to do it, you'll have plenty of time to spend in these pages trying to

Learn The Logbook Rules (HOS)

Follow that link and you'll soon be able to help others learn to manage their time like a true professional.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Kevin, Old School is right, but there is a thing I want to clarify. The hours you get back at midnight still have to fit into your current 14 hour day.

If you have 3 hours left of the day's 14 at midnight, and you get back 5 as a recap, you can only drive the 3. Then you must stop for your regular 10.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
If you have 3 hours left of the day's 14 at midnight, and you get back 5 as a recap, you can only drive the 3. Then you must stop for your regular 10.

Errol, maybe I'm not fully understanding your scenario, but it seems to me that your example would allow Kevin to drive for eight hours.

Now, I realize that I'm just an old country boy who drives a truck for a living, and you are a certified mathematician, but help us out here with a little more clarity please.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Start your day at 1300 (1pm). You must stop the next morning 14 hours later at 0300 (3am)
(Lemme see: 13 (1pm) plus 14 hours = 27. Starting a new day means 27-24=3 (If you go past 12 midnight you take away the 24 hours of the day before..)

So, at midnight you have 3 hours to go.

Courtesy of your recap that comes at midnight you get 5 brand new hours added. But your 14 hours for the day can only go 3 hours more.

So, at 3am, you stop for the "day". Your driving time has that extra 2 hours left (we all know that 5-3=2) but you must reset the 14 hour daily clock. That takes either a 10 hour break or the crazy 8/2 split sleeper before you can continue your journey.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Thanks Errol. I misread your scenario. I thought you were saying he had 3 hours left on his 70, but you were using the 14 hour clock.

As usual, when we get to discussing how the clocks work, I'm quite sure we have poor Kevin's head spinning.

As a matter of fact, my brain is hurting a little just nowconfused.gif

The Breeze's Comment
member avatar

I just wanted to add to this. While you're doing all the confusing number crunching, if you're trying to recap hours during your driving day and your goal is to have full usage of the hours you gain before your 14 ends. Take into account the time zone in which your logs are set in relation to your pu/del time zone. I used to run recaps religiously and pulled reefer freight at night mostly. It's always a shocker when you realize halfway through your day that you regain your hours back at 2am and not midnight. Don't ask how I know this lol. 😏

Dan

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
Don't ask how I know this lol.

Excellent point Dan. You made me chuckle, simply because we've all been there. There's nothing like a big surprise lesson learned, for making something stick in your memory.

Tim H.'s Comment
member avatar

I set my alarm for 23:30 the other night so I could roll at midnight. Alarm goes off and I half grudgingly get up. Sat with a cup of coffee while waiting for my recap. After about 20 minutes the caffeine starts to take effect and I'm ready, let's go, lets roll, been sitting since 10:00, gonna meet a repower at 05:00 170 miles away. So I'm sitting there watching the clock on my qualcomm and midnight hits and nothing happens. Then it hits me, my DOT hours are central time and I'm in eastern time zone. Damn I coulda slept another hour.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

I set my alarm for 23:30 the other night so I could roll at midnight. Alarm goes off and I half grudgingly get up. Sat with a cup of coffee while waiting for my recap. After about 20 minutes the caffeine starts to take effect and I'm ready, let's go, lets roll, been sitting since 10:00, gonna meet a repower at 05:00 170 miles away. So I'm sitting there watching the clock on my qualcomm and midnight hits and nothing happens. Then it hits me, my DOT hours are central time and I'm in eastern time zone. Damn I coulda slept another hour.

Old School has a decade long habit of leaving out one key detail. This time it was the fact that the Qualcomm may be based off of a different timezone.

He can't make it too easy for you!

smile.gif

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

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