Why Don't We Use Flares?

Topic 20426 | Page 1

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MC1371's Comment
member avatar

There was an accident about a week or two ago, someone parked on the side with just flashers (Big no no) but it was in the fog. Got me thinking of this past winter and some interesting times in heavy or blowing snow. Why don't we use flares as well as DOT mandated itty bitty triangles?

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

ChickieMonster's Comment
member avatar

I've only ever seen flares deployed once. And I want to say it was a cop who had them out. It was night on a two lane highway and there was a disabled vehicle on a narrow shoulder.

But I've never seen them any other time. Maybe due to the fire risk?

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

I agree with ChikieMonster. Only time I've ever flares is when they were in useby law enforcement or firefighters.

Oh and my triangles aren't itty bitty. They're about a foot on each side sitting on a very heavy sand filled bar/weight. You have to unfold them then snap them into their triangle shape, then twist the base to make them stable. I've seen those tiny ones you're talking about and my guess is drivers bought them because they're cheaper. My company provides the good ones with every truck. They permanently mount a case for them in the sidebox.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
murderspolywog's Comment
member avatar

I would be willing to bet it has something to do with hazmat. If you have trucks that haul hazmat , they can't use flares. I only haul class 1.4, and 3. I know flares are no no on both of those loads. Also might be a dot thing as well I don't know if flares are allowed in lue of triangles, triangles never burn out or roll into the brush and ketch it on fire.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

Yep, I haul hazmat gasoline so definitely a giant no-no.

Too many factors, some can use and some can't, another thing the shop needs to keep in stock for drivers. Triangles are just cheaper.

I can see Prime supporting this since they will just forcibly resell it to the driver for a profit.

rofl-3.gif

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Harry H. [ navypoppop ]'s Comment
member avatar

ChickieMonster said it right. Usually the only people placing flares out are law enforcement people and probably due to regulations regarding hazmat situations. They used to be very useful but the fire risks were too great. Just be sure to use the triangles and place them properly.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

MC1371's Comment
member avatar

I think some of you are over thinking the question.

Are they still legal to use?

I don't pull hazmat/rolling bombs. I am not convinced of the effectiveness of reflectors in extreme weather conditions. *Read Snow Storms, ultra dense fog. Both of which are regular issues north of the Mason Dixon line.

Knock on wood, I've only needed to emergency stop once so far, and conditions were just a bit Rainey so in that instance the triangles were fine.

Now one more time :) Non-HazMat, Extreme weather. Are they legal?

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

I think some of you are over thinking the question.

Are they still legal to use?

I don't pull hazmat/rolling bombs. I am not convinced of the effectiveness of reflectors in extreme weather conditions. *Read Snow Storms, ultra dense fog. Both of which are regular issues north of the Mason Dixon line.

Knock on wood, I've only needed to emergency stop once so far, and conditions were just a bit Rainey so in that instance the triangles were fine.

Now one more time :) Non-HazMat, Extreme weather. Are they legal?

I read all the replies, I don't see "over thinking". I see several people trying to sincerely answer a rather obscure question. Not sure why you're obscessing over this. DOT requires us to carry three reflective triangles, in working order. Although I am not aware of any legal restriction, I suggest you first ask your company if carrying flares is in compliance with their policies. Many times company rules trump DOT.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar
DOT requires us to carry three reflective triangles, in working order.

Straight from the Colorado CDL Manual, page 20:

Emergency Equipment.

Vehicles must be equipped with emergency equipment. Look for:

• Fire extinguisher(s).

• Spare electrical fuses (unless equipped with circuit breakers).

• Warning devices for parked vehicles (for example, three reflective warning triangles or 6 fusees or 3 liquid burning flares).

So, in Colorado anyway, they're interchangeable. As others have said, I'm sure it's just a matter of cost combined with the fact that they aren't legal for certain types of loads. They aren't always the best option, but they are always legal and easy to use, so why not?

Does anyone know if flares are even legal in every state? If not, that could be another reason.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

miracleofmagick's Comment
member avatar

As far as I know they are legal in every state. I can think of a few reasons most companies prefer triangles though.

Triangles are reusable.

Triangles can be used by everyone. Regardless of load type.

Triangles don't burn out.

And that's just of the top of my head

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