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Another example of why it's best NOT to rely on the GPS.

Topic 20448 | Page 1

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G-Town's Comment
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Thought I'd share this little ditty...

Last weekend as I departed one of my Walmart store stops in Hammonton NJ (blueberry capital of the world), there was an immediate Police detour, diverting traffic from NJ 206 to US 30. Since I have been up and down US 30 a bazillion times through "South Jousie", no biggie; knew exactly where I was going. Just for giggles though? I let the GPS (both) re-route as I continued west on 30. Almost immediately my Navi-Go GPS wanted me to make a left onto a residential street with "no-trucks" signage on both sides of the road and huge, old-growth trees lining the street on both sides. Yikes, that would have been a pant-load of fun! I pressed "re-route" again, listened to both systems sweet-talk me into believing their "cute little lies"...a couple of miles later (still on 30 west), same thing, only both systems were requesting that I turn onto a restricted route. Good grief. I let this play out as I progressed west, eventually ending up at a cross roads with Rt. 73, a road that allows access to the NJTP. My experiment is not quite over yet. The last "hurrah" (in your best Marine Corp bark) was when the RM Truckers GPS wanted me to go North on 73 (at that point), which would have run me into a 13' 3" overpass...! In typical Jousie fashion, the signage for this low-overpass is (ah-hem) rather inconspicuous, easy to miss. "Great", I thought. Proceeding another mile East on 30 gets past the low overpass situation on 73 (which is what I did), entering the road 1/4 mile southeast of the overpass allowing unimpeded turnpike access. "The perils of local driving"...I thought.

Not to belabor the much debated point; although most of the time the GPS systems are fine, my experience has repeatedly taught me NOT to blindly rely on their direction, especially when an unexpected "out-of-route" situation occurs (as was the case here). Had I NOT known where I was or how to get around the original detour (12 miles east ago), I would have found a safe place to pull-over, and study my RM Truckers Road Atlas to find a truck-safe route.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Ducky's Comment
member avatar

I am kinda nerdy when it comes to maps, the RM atlas and such. Just love studying them...it's fun. Really makes me feel more prepared and relaxed when I include it in my trip planning.

I like what you said about the mature imposing trees on the reroute. Staying alert and observant can help us make decisions that our brains and past experience agree are the right ones. At least in many cases.

In training, I missed a turn and the RM truckers GPS rerouted, wanting me to turn into a "one way in, one way out" apartment complex. I was like "No way in hell I'm turning in there...I was looking at the road, it was beyond obvious. He still wanted to think it must be right...the GPS won't like. Huh?

I hope more trainers realize how valuable it is to spend time teaching this to students.

Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

I was taught (not sure if it's true) that the NaviGo routes a "truck friendly" path, but once you hit "reroute" all bets are off. However, two days ago it routed me on a "truck friendly" route which also had "no thru trucks over 10 wheels" signs. It was too late. I was already in, with no shoulder and nowhere to turn around. Fortunately didn't have any issues, but I'll definitely go another way if I'm ever back there.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

I was taught (not sure if it's true) that the NaviGo routes a "truck friendly" path, but once you hit "reroute" all bets are off. However, two days ago it routed me on a "truck friendly" route which also had "no thru trucks over 10 wheels" signs. It was too late. I was already in, with no shoulder and nowhere to turn around. Fortunately didn't have any issues, but I'll definitely go another way if I'm ever back there.

Although I was never formerly taught that, I believe it to be 100% true. I know the NaviGo routes we use to get to the stores are all pre-programmed from DC to first stop; last stop back to DC. It's the "in-between" stops that heed a "driver beware" warning. That is where a lot of the newer guys get hung-up.

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

Great post G Town. Something I've always wondered but never actually found the answer to--what is the best way to find a legal route within a city? The atlas is a vital tool for long trips, but it doesn't include much information on specific streets within cities. Usually you can just call the customer, but there are some situations that doesn't work for, like delivering to retail stores.

If you call the local police, will they usually be able to give you a legal route beforehand? I've always just looked at the maps and taken my best guess, but that method isn't foolproof whatsoever.

Unholychaos's Comment
member avatar

I was taught (not sure if it's true) that the NaviGo routes a "truck friendly" path, but once you hit "reroute" all bets are off. However, two days ago it routed me on a "truck friendly" route which also had "no thru trucks over 10 wheels" signs. It was too late. I was already in, with no shoulder and nowhere to turn around. Fortunately didn't have any issues, but I'll definitely go another way if I'm ever back there.

I was taught the same thing, and to NEVER hit reroute. If I miss my turn, I just pull over as soon as safely possible and pull up an aerial view of where I'm at, figure out a plan to get back on route, then follow that route on street view, paying close attention to any signs. When in doubt, I call my dispatcher and he helps me out, or gives me a second opinion.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Pianoman wrote:

Great post G Town. Something I've always wondered but never actually found the answer to--what is the best way to find a legal route within a city? The atlas is a vital tool for long trips, but it doesn't include much information on specific streets within cities. Usually you can just call the customer, but there are some situations that doesn't work for, like delivering to retail stores.

If you call the local police, will they usually be able to give you a legal route beforehand? I've always just looked at the maps and taken my best guess, but that method isn't foolproof whatsoever.

Something to try:

Truck friendly maps

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I was taught (not sure if it's true) that the NaviGo routes a "truck friendly" path, but once you hit "reroute" all bets are off. However, two days ago it routed me on a "truck friendly" route which also had "no thru trucks over 10 wheels" signs. It was too late. I was already in, with no shoulder and nowhere to turn around. Fortunately didn't have any issues, but I'll definitely go another way if I'm ever back there.

double-quotes-end.png

I was taught the same thing, and to NEVER hit reroute. If I miss my turn, I just pull over as soon as safely possible and pull up an aerial view of where I'm at, figure out a plan to get back on route, then follow that route on street view, paying close attention to any signs. When in doubt, I call my dispatcher and he helps me out, or gives me a second opinion.

Hitting re-route on the Interstates is a fairly safe bet. It's when off the beaten path, it can provide a more precarious result.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Pete B.'s Comment
member avatar

I have a love-hate relationship with my Navigo... I rely heavily on it when delivering in towns too small to be featured in my RM atlas, and once while pulling a HAZMAT load was following directions that were allegedly HAZMAT-specific routing. I arrived at an intersection and was instructed to continue onto a road that was not only off-limits to HAZMAT loads, but to trucks as well. You've got to always be aware and able to think quickly.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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