TMC, CFI, Roehl, Swift

Topic 20461 | Page 1

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∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

My original plan was to go to the roadmasters in Cleveland, OH. After speaking with the school recruiter, I decided that I was going to go the company sponsored training route. I am sure that the school is really good, but after 3 hours of this recruiter, I wanted to kill a spider, and pretend it was her. I couldn't even say more than 3 words, without her jumping in and telling me "you don't know what you want, I know what you want." the next day, I called her back, telling her my decision to go company training, and she went off again. So I just hung up on her, after thanking her for her time, While she was telling me that a true company shouldn't need a commitment... . Just, Wow...

So, the companies I applied to, are TMC, CFI, Roehl, and Swift. I have to say, the driver pulse app is awesome. I was able to get fast answers from each recruiter, vs calling and having to leave a message, and hope they call back.

Roehl notified me that I am outside of their area, but thank you for applying.

Swift (recruiter - Tim), He was super helpful, and they will send me to Indianapolis for training.

CFI (recruiter - Cortney) really impressed me, and I will train in Joplin.

The big surprise is TMC (recruiter - Dawn) As some of you know, TMC was my top choice company, but I moved to Niagara Falls, outside of their hiring area. They recent extended their New Student hiring area to Interstate 90, and allow a 20 mile buffer beyond that. When Cortney told me that my address was 24 miles, and that they will make an exception, I could barely contain myself. I still can't.

I will find out Monday or Tuesday, my fate with these 3 companies. I know that I will be happy at any of them, thanks to their drivers that are part of TT.

I have also realized that I am not as patient as I thought I was, while waiting for the answers.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

You've been around here for some time now. It's advice common in these parts to not judge a company based on an experience with a recruiter. I'd say it also applies to private trucking schools. You need to figure out why you want to go to trucking school vs company-sponsored school, and then stick with the plan.

I went to private school and eventually wound up butting heads with the school owner / instructor. I briefly thought about withdrawing, as this happened shortly after my start. I decided to stick it out, trust the process, and I proceeded to pass my skills test / driving exam on the first try.

There are lots of boisterous personalities in this industry. Don't let them persuade or dissuade you from your goals.

Sandman's Comment
member avatar

Best of luck.

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

My original plan was to go to the roadmasters in Cleveland, OH. After speaking with the school recruiter, I decided that I was going to go the company sponsored training route. I am sure that the school is really good, but after 3 hours of this recruiter, I wanted to kill a spider, and pretend it was her. I couldn't even say more than 3 words, without her jumping in and telling me "you don't know what you want, I know what you want." the next day, I called her back, telling her my decision to go company training, and she went off again. So I just hung up on her, after thanking her for her time, While she was telling me that a true company shouldn't need a commitment... . Just, Wow...

So, the companies I applied to, are TMC, CFI, Roehl, and Swift. I have to say, the driver pulse app is awesome. I was able to get fast answers from each recruiter, vs calling and having to leave a message, and hope they call back.

Roehl notified me that I am outside of their area, but thank you for applying.

Swift (recruiter - Tim), He was super helpful, and they will send me to Indianapolis for training.

CFI (recruiter - Cortney) really impressed me, and I will train in Joplin.

The big surprise is TMC (recruiter - Dawn) As some of you know, TMC was my top choice company, but I moved to Niagara Falls, outside of their hiring area. They recent extended their New Student hiring area to Interstate 90, and allow a 20 mile buffer beyond that. When Cortney told me that my address was 24 miles, and that they will make an exception, I could barely contain myself. I still can't.

I will find out Monday or Tuesday, my fate with these 3 companies. I know that I will be happy at any of them, thanks to their drivers that are part of TT.

I have also realized that I am not as patient as I thought I was, while waiting for the answers.

I am not judging the school, just the recruiter. Like I stated, I am sure it is a good school. My wife and I agreed, that it will be better for our check book, to go company route. That, and the TMC possibility, were the main factors. I just did not like the recruiter. I have been through the school, it looked top notch.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Why are you bothering to judge the recruiters? You're giving us a rundown of your experiences with, and feelings toward the recruiters, and then telling us it doesn't matter to you. It obviously does or you wouldn't care enough to mention it.

You also could have used our online company-sponsored training application to apply to those companies and others at the same time.

You need to leave your emotions out of the process and think logically. Keep an even keel. This is only the process of calling recruiters. Things are going to become very stressful and overwhelming at times once you get started. You're also going to come across plenty of personalities you don't mesh well with. Be prepared for that.

A full half of the people who enter these Company-Sponsored Training Programs never even get through the initial schooling to get their CDL. Another 25% of those left don't make it through the training to go solo. So you have a long, tough road ahead of you.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

It might benefit you to read this:

Do you have the right temperament for this job?

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

I find it funny, that, by giving an opinion of one school recruiter, I suddenly might not have the temperament? Who is judging who? Sometimes people just don't get along, we are all human, prone to error, and snap judgements. She may be a great person, who knows. I just know I disliked her. When a person tells me, what is best for me and my family, and that company sponsored programs are crap, I dismiss them. Even if she deserved sainthood, I would have ultimately chosen the company sponsored route. It just makes better financial sense.

Brett, I used the link, it auto applied to 3 companies. If there was another link, I missed it.

All that is left for me now, is the high roads training. I use the app, while at work during my down time, the two work really well together.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

No judgement...it's preparation that can only help you. Point; if you are that annoyed with a recruiter,...and now us, the people committed to helping you, etc.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Man, let's face it. You're difficult to get along with. We've seen plenty of it. I'm just telling you right now these companies don't put up with it. Every new class gets students sent home the first week for no other reason than they're personalities. I had a guy email me the other day saying he spoke with a recruiter at one of the major carriers and they said they didn't think he would be a good fit. He said they wouldn't answer his question about why.

So I emailed the company and asked them what had happened with that guy. They said he just wanted to keep arguing and talking over top of the recruiter when he was trying to explain something to him. He said, "If the guy can't even get along with a recruiter in a simple phone conversation we already know there's no chance of that guy working out."

I agree completely.

So they blacklisted the guy. Even though he qualifies, they didn't like his tone so he's out of that opportunity permanently.

we are all human, prone to error, and snap judgements

We're not at all equally prone to that stuff. You are obviously much quicker to react and have a bigger chip on your shoulder than most. I'm just telling you for your own good you're going to be on a bus home in two days if you don't chill out in a big hurry. It happens all the time. These companies take an enormous risk investing in people coming off the street, and the job requires a tremendous amount of patience and tolerance for people, for changes in schedule, for erratic sleep patterns, breakdowns, weather, and so many other things. They can tell on day one if someone is too confrontational or impatient to see this through for the long run and they won't hesitate to cut those people loose.

In fact, the instructors are often instructed to purposely try to push people's buttons a little bit to see how they handle it. They want to figure out quickly which people don't have the temperament for it.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

Brett, and GTown.

I will be the first one to admit I am not the easiest person to get a long with. I didn't think I was being upset with either of you. But there might be some lost in writing translation going on. And that is my fault, for not being more careful about how I write things. I have always arrived to be as teachable as I possibly can. I still have my opinions, based on the high standards I place on myself. That sometimes bleeds over.

I honestly value both your thoughts and insights, even when we butt heads. I will take all this with me as I move forward. It is something I know I need to be aware of, about myself.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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