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Condo vs lightweight prime

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Robert's Comment
member avatar

Prime gives lightweight truckers extra 5cpm just for driving the lightweight trucks. My question is does that 5cpm make a big enough difference when it come to comfort and space? I also read prime has Wal-Mart dedicated but only drive lightweights if you do this. Is Wal-Mart good pay and home time? Also what other differences in condo and lightweight trucks are there to really choose one or the other?

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Patrick C.'s Comment
member avatar

The full condos are usually around a 72" high roof sleeper. The light weights are usually mid roof and probably a 60" sleeper.

Rainey should be able to answer questions concerning truck dimensions that Prime uses.

G-Town drives on a WalMart dedicated for Swift. He will be able to give you insight into those accounts.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

G-Town drives on a WalMart dedicated for Swift. He will be able to give you insight into those accounts.

That is true. When I have time, I will come-back later with a response to your inquiry.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Adam B.'s Comment
member avatar

I drive a lightweight. The difference is in the lightweight, your bed is just about against the drivers seat. There is also a bit less storage. The lightweight had 2 overhead storage compartments above the bed and a small netted cubby hole as well. You can raise the bed up for additional storage as well. . The engine is smaller in the lightweight as well. They come with Detroit Diesel 13s as opposed to the 15s in the condo. Basically means climbing hills can be a pain sometimes.

Pay wise, that extra 5 cents added up. I think it ewuals around an extra $6000 a year on average. It gets paid out on per diem.

I'm perfectly fine with the lightweight. I never intended to bring much stuff on the truck in the first place and I like the extra money. My biggest complaint is the smaller engine.

Something I forgot to add is driving a lightweight opens you up to additional freight because you can haul heavier loads the condo can't. I think the heaviest load I've done was 47 or 48,000 pounds.

You don't have to have a lightweight if you don't want to but you may be waiting a few days for a condo if you go that route.

Per Diem:

Getting paid per diem means getting a portion of your salary paid to you without taxes taken out. It's technically classified as a meal and expense reimbursement.

Truck drivers and others who travel for a living get large tax deductions for meal expenses. The Government set up per diem pay as a way to reimburse some of the taxes you pay with each paycheck instead of making you wait until tax filing season.

Getting per diem pay means a driver will get a larger paycheck each week but a smaller tax return at tax time.

We have a ton of information on our wiki page on per diem pay

BQ 's Comment
member avatar

I also have driven a lightweight here at Prime for the past year and change, currently turning in for condo as I take training course. As mentioned the financial incentive can work out to several grand a year (5 or 6) depending upon miles you run. Basically multiply miles ×.05, if 3000 miles, its an extra $150 that week, avg of 2500 during first year is more likely, which would be about $125/wk×52=6500, however consider hometime and such figure about 6 grand. As far as space, the International lightweight has much more storage space available than Freighliner lightweight. Additional benefits of driving a lightweight are easier maneuvarability, particularly in tight spaces, might only be about a foot in reality but can do wonders mentally on the mind and stress of a rookie. You also have the ability to haul slightly heavier loads than condos because the truck itself is lighter. I don't know about engine specifics as previously pointed out but my lightweight international felt like it pulled uphill better than my trainers Cascadia condo, the reality of it tho may differ. As for the Wal-Mart dedicated, I know the one out of Lewiston, ME required lightweight (did at least, maybe changed) and I also believe it had a minimum pay, however don't take that as gospel. Good luck on your journey.....

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

For the record, my condo with a dd15 is a dog on hills too when loaded heavy.

Also, I've hauled just a tic over 49k and remained legal at 79,900.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Robert...My suggestion is to get several months OTR experience before committing to Walmart Dedicated assignment. Can be a very tough account for an entry level driver to handle.

The pros are; more steady income & hometime, typically domiciled at a Walmart DC, rarely wait more for a load, never need to search for an empty trailer, regular routes (that you will learn) and a very accessible driver support team.

The cons are; demanding delivery schedule, most stores are live unloads, very close quarter maneuvering at times, good interpersonal skills although optional, will help you get things done, and typically 13+ hour days.

Although an experienced driver can make great money on the Walmart account, takes at least 6 months for a rookie to gain traction and learn all there is to know (on top of all the other rookie learning curve issues there are) about the stores and their process.

Click on these links for past threads about Walmart:

Walmart Dedicated

Good luck!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Robert's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for all the info everyone. I'll keep pondering on it, and let you all know what way I go.

I drive a lightweight. The difference is in the lightweight, your bed is just about against the drivers seat. There is also a bit less storage. The lightweight had 2 overhead storage compartments above the bed and a small netted cubby hole as well. You can raise the bed up for additional storage as well. . The engine is smaller in the lightweight as well. They come with Detroit Diesel 13s as opposed to the 15s in the condo. Basically means climbing hills can be a pain sometimes.

Pay wise, that extra 5 cents added up. I think it ewuals around an extra $6000 a year on average. It gets paid out on per diem.

I'm perfectly fine with the lightweight. I never intended to bring much stuff on the truck in the first place and I like the extra money. My biggest complaint is the smaller engine.

Something I forgot to add is driving a lightweight opens you up to additional freight because you can haul heavier loads the condo can't. I think the heaviest load I've done was 47 or 48,000 pounds.

You don't have to have a lightweight if you don't want to but you may be waiting a few days for a condo if you go that route.

I also have driven a lightweight here at Prime for the past year and change, currently turning in for condo as I take training course. As mentioned the financial incentive can work out to several grand a year (5 or 6) depending upon miles you run. Basically multiply miles ×.05, if 3000 miles, its an extra $150 that week, avg of 2500 during first year is more likely, which would be about $125/wk×52=6500, however consider hometime and such figure about 6 grand. As far as space, the International lightweight has much more storage space available than Freighliner lightweight. Additional benefits of driving a lightweight are easier maneuvarability, particularly in tight spaces, might only be about a foot in reality but can do wonders mentally on the mind and stress of a rookie. You also have the ability to haul slightly heavier loads than condos because the truck itself is lighter. I don't know about engine specifics as previously pointed out but my lightweight international felt like it pulled uphill better than my trainers Cascadia condo, the reality of it tho may differ. As for the Wal-Mart dedicated, I know the one out of Lewiston, ME required lightweight (did at least, maybe changed) and I also believe it had a minimum pay, however don't take that as gospel. Good luck on your journey.....

For the record, my condo with a dd15 is a dog on hills too when loaded heavy.

Also, I've hauled just a tic over 49k and remained legal at 79,900.

Robert...My suggestion is to get several months OTR experience before committing to Walmart Dedicated assignment. Can be a very tough account for an entry level driver to handle.

The pros are; more steady income & hometime, typically domiciled at a Walmart DC, rarely wait more for a load, never need to search for an empty trailer, regular routes (that you will learn) and a very accessible driver support team.

The cons are; demanding delivery schedule, most stores are live unloads, very close quarter maneuvering at times, good interpersonal skills although optional, will help you get things done, and typically 13+ hour days.

Although an experienced driver can make great money on the Walmart account, takes at least 6 months for a rookie to gain traction and learn all there is to know (on top of all the other rookie learning curve issues there are) about the stores and their process.

Click on these links for past threads about Walmart:

Walmart Dedicated

Good luck!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Per Diem:

Getting paid per diem means getting a portion of your salary paid to you without taxes taken out. It's technically classified as a meal and expense reimbursement.

Truck drivers and others who travel for a living get large tax deductions for meal expenses. The Government set up per diem pay as a way to reimburse some of the taxes you pay with each paycheck instead of making you wait until tax filing season.

Getting per diem pay means a driver will get a larger paycheck each week but a smaller tax return at tax time.

We have a ton of information on our wiki page on per diem pay

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

As reefer condo, I get plenty of freight and have hauled 46,500 beer loads legally. Just depends on how much fuel you add :)

The internationals do have more room buy no guarantee you would get one.

Something to consider is a pet. If you planned on bringing a pet there is no room for bowls, litter boxes etc. That was one of the main reasons I wanted the condo was for my cat. Also the condo has a top bunk which I used for storage with plastic containers.

You can remove the passenger seat in the LW to put a fridge or some drawers.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Robert, check out this Former Thread On Lightweight Trucks. Miss Myoshi posted a video of her lightweight truck interior. It may help you get an idea of how these things are set up.

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