Looking For NEW TRUCKING HOME

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AntoineF's Comment
member avatar

HEY EVERYBODY ITS ME AGAIN Well out looking again for another job this time i finally don't care what trucks company have or how they are outfitted! I have found out APU'S ,inverters, and a fridge is nothing compared to low pay and miles, and i can't eat a pretty truck, at THIS POINT I DON'T REALLY CARE IF THE TRUCK ONLY RUNS 60 MPH!

Before anyone jumps to judge me i have had one ticket in the last 3 yrs 7 mph over! no dot reportable accidents, no failed drug test or anything else to make me a risky hire! I am just tired of companies not keeping their part of our agreement, If they say i have to run 3 weeks at a time i'll do it with no complaints but when its time to go home i expect to get home(freight allowing) not being sent West from PA to new mexico while i live in GA 2 TO 3 DAYS BEFORE I'M SUPPOSE TO BE GOING HOME! I thought Marine recruiters could lie in the 70's but these truck recruiters have made it a new art form! I HAVE YET MET A FM , DM YET WITH ANY KIND OF BACKBONE OR HONOR! kNOWING i haven't met they all, but the few I have met leaves me thinking if i was in combat with them, can you say "friendly fire" . Ok bad joke!

All I want is the pay promised, and the hometime ASAP due to my location as promised, and no phone calls while i'm sleeping on my 10 hr dot break!

Looking at Heartland,barr-nun and jb hunt intermodal and a new company with only 3 trucks 7 sons out of georgia,maybe smaller would be better?

I'M old at 58 no longer is a mans word his bond it seems, I'm not looking to BE baby sitted but if keep my word i expect the same, (trying to get into heaven now-LOL)

I dont hang out in truck stops and only stop because of the gladly accepted 30 min rule! we drivers love so!

I'M NOT perfect and sometimes that old tymes MARINE shows his head, but leave me alone and let me drive and i'm as happy as a ------- in a pecker tree!

Anybody got any half descent leads, Don't worry I won't use your name. If your'e worried !

Well get some rest and be safe thanks

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

APU's:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Antoine, you've been in the trucking game plenty long enough that you shouldn't be having these problems at this point. You should know how to get along with people. You should know how to get problems solved. You should have proven yourself at a level where management will help you out if you need help, which should be almost never. You should be turning so many miles year round that you're begging for a nap once in a while.

This whole, "Nobody is any good" attitude:

  • I am just tired of companies not keeping their part of our agreement
  • sometimes that old tymes MARINE shows his head
  • I HAVE YET MET A FM , DM YET WITH ANY KIND OF BACKBONE OR HONOR
  • ....is nothing compared to low pay and miles, and i can't eat a pretty truck

......I mean, come on, man.

In almost 25 years in this industry I've watched way more guys like you than I can count just never figure out how to get along with people or settle into a company and make things work. I could recommend 50 companies to you and I guarantee you'll hate every one of them in no time.

I'm not saying you're a bad guy, but I am saying you're one of those guys who just doesn't know how to be part of the team and make things happen for yourself in this industry.

The good news is that you could do great at any of the major carriers, and probably most of the smaller ones. The bad news is you won't if you don't figure out how to get along with people and fit into this industry the right way. You can't go around "being a Marine" and think it's going to get you anywhere. Haven't you figured that out yet? You're not a drill sargeant, you're a truck driver. And if you keep acting like a drill sergeant and trying to make demands and trying to lay down the law you're never going to be happy no matter where you work. That stuff just isn't going to fly.

I'm an Italian from New York, raised by union steelworkers, union autoworkers, mechanics, farmers, and military folks. It took me only a very short time to realize I couldn't just speak my mind and blurt out anything I wanted to say and make demands and all that. It backfires instantly. By my standards I had to talk to everyone like I was talking to a kindergarten class. It was annoying, to be honest, but it was the only way to get anyone to listen to what I had to say and work with me.

So I have no suggestions for a company you can just march into spouting orders and pointing fingers and taking names. If you're gonna take that approach you're going to be miserable. If you learn how to work with office personnel and you're doing your job at the highest level you'll be happy no matter where you work.

That's how it is. I offer you what I know, you do with it what you like.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Patrick C.'s Comment
member avatar

I wasn't going to reply at first, but I want to share a personal truth.

If you asked many of the drivers at my company about my DM , most would bad mouth her. I have heard horror story after horror story. You know what, I wouldn't want any other one at the company. She has me figured out. She knows when I like to run, she knows I am a no news is good news kinda guy. She keeps me running. There was a spell I went without getting home on time. On my load to New York, she told me that she didn't think I would make it home on time. I politely reminded her that I am never home on time. I haven't been late since. I may have the DM that most of the others driver cringe at the thought of ever having her as they DM. Me, I am as happy as a pig in S**t!

Semper gumbi (Always flexible)

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

I wasn't going to reply at first, but I want to share a personal truth.

If you asked many of the drivers at my company about my DM , most would bad mouth her. I have heard horror story after horror story. You know what, I wouldn't want any other one at the company. She has me figured out. She knows when I like to run, she knows I am a no news is good news kinda guy. She keeps me running. There was a spell I went without getting home on time. On my load to New York, she told me that she didn't think I would make it home on time. I politely reminded her that I am never home on time. I haven't been late since. I may have the DM that most of the others driver cringe at the thought of ever having her as they DM. Me, I am as happy as a pig in S**t!

Semper gumbi (Always flexible)

I've come across this same thing many times over the years. I'll talk to another driver who has the same dispatcher I do and that driver hates him. He can't get any miles, he can't get home on time, they don't get along - the whole thing. Me? I'm begging for a break I'm always running so hard, I get all kinds of special favors when I really want them, and we get along perfectly.

It's one thing if a driver at your company says they can't get miles or can't get home or whatever. But when they have the same dispatcher you have then it's obvious that not all drivers get treated equally. What's not so obvious to some drivers is why we're not all treated equally, and some drivers never do figure it out.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

AntoineF, I'm now with RBI (Robert Bearden Inc) out of Cairo, GA. Most loads originate in Valdosta. I'm averaging 2,400-2,500 miles a week and get home weekly.

Prior to this I drove for Schneider (out of Lebanon, TN OC). Schneider kept all their promises to me and always got me home when I asked. Even though I live in an area not known for lots of freight (NW Florida).

Some might consider my pay low, but it's relative. I'm making the same money getting home each week and staying Southeast, as I was making getting home twice a month and driving nationwide. Check out rbitrucking.com.

I'm 55 and understand the importance of promises kept. I can't promise either of these companies is your dream job, but it's worked for me.

Good luck!

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

OldRookie's Comment
member avatar

HEY EVERYBODY ITS ME AGAIN Well out looking again for another job this time i finally don't care what trucks company have or how they are outfitted! I have found out APU'S ,inverters, and a fridge is nothing compared to low pay and miles, and i can't eat a pretty truck, at THIS POINT I DON'T REALLY CARE IF THE TRUCK ONLY RUNS 60 MPH!

Before anyone jumps to judge me i have had one ticket in the last 3 yrs 7 mph over! no dot reportable accidents, no failed drug test or anything else to make me a risky hire! I am just tired of companies not keeping their part of our agreement, If they say i have to run 3 weeks at a time i'll do it with no complaints but when its time to go home i expect to get home(freight allowing) not being sent West from PA to new mexico while i live in GA 2 TO 3 DAYS BEFORE I'M SUPPOSE TO BE GOING HOME! I thought Marine recruiters could lie in the 70's but these truck recruiters have made it a new art form! I HAVE YET MET A FM , DM YET WITH ANY KIND OF BACKBONE OR HONOR! kNOWING i haven't met they all, but the few I have met leaves me thinking if i was in combat with them, can you say "friendly fire" . Ok bad joke!

All I want is the pay promised, and the hometime ASAP due to my location as promised, and no phone calls while i'm sleeping on my 10 hr dot break!

Looking at Heartland,barr-nun and jb hunt intermodal and a new company with only 3 trucks 7 sons out of georgia,maybe smaller would be better?

I'M old at 58 no longer is a mans word his bond it seems, I'm not looking to BE baby sitted but if keep my word i expect the same, (trying to get into heaven now-LOL)

I dont hang out in truck stops and only stop because of the gladly accepted 30 min rule! we drivers love so!

I'M NOT perfect and sometimes that old tymes MARINE shows his head, but leave me alone and let me drive and i'm as happy as a ------- in a pecker tree!

Anybody got any half descent leads, Don't worry I won't use your name. If your'e worried !

Well get some rest and be safe thanks

My company Millis will run you "regional," home every weekend, or OTR out of our Cartersville, GA terminal. I'm OTR and get home on time, or early, 99% of the time. If you don't get home as you requested, you get an extra 5 CPM until you're home.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

APU's:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Running Bear's Comment
member avatar

I'm going with TMC it's a flat bed company. I will start out at 26% of the load. I will be home every weekend unless I want to stay out. Not sure if this is what you want, but check them out.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

To be honest, I think what he wants is for us to jump on his "I hate dispatchers and office people" bandwagon and have a big complaining rally. Gather all the troops and hate on things for a while.

The country is loaded with top notch trucking companies to work for but if you don't know how to get along with people and be a functional part of a team you're never going to get anywhere in this industry. He wants validation that the problem isn't him, it's everyone else.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Old School's Comment
member avatar
He wants validation that the problem isn't him, it's everyone else.

Brett is being honest here. I think often times the new folks in here consider him harsh at times. Sometimes honesty and truth are a little edgy.

We see this phenomenon all the time in this forum. Truck drivers are famous for needing validation, and they are usually quite flumoxed when we see right through their little ploys. Once you've followed along with a lot of the first posts of people who are already in this career you begin to see a lot of behavioral patterns exhibited.

Like recently when we saw right through someone's story they started accusing me as being a part of the problem that drivers are facing. I basically ignored their comments because they were ludicrous. Brett jumped to my defense and they started saying he was just as bad as me!

Sometimes the truth hurts. It usually depends on which side of it you have chosen to be on.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Patrick C.'s Comment
member avatar

This site IS called Trucking Truth. It is not called Failed Trucker Coddling.

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