Truck Driving Overseas

Topic 20562 | Page 3

Page 3 of 3 Previous Page Go To Page:
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Although I've never been in the military, I have always done a lot of risky things for work and hobby. One of the reasons I've survived all these years unscathed is because I listen to people who have been there. Patrick offered his first hand experiences. Old School's friend was kidnapped and had to be rescued, lucky to be alive. Several others offered very well thought out arguments.

After hearing all of that, if you still think you'd like to walk untrained and unprepared, without any military experience, into a war zone hoping to make a few extra bucks I guess you might as well do it because you're obviously not long for this world anyhow.

The hardest part about learning to manage risk is surviving those early experiences. Joe Simpson, the very well known author of "Touching The Void" and other mountain climbing adventures, should have died about a dozen times already but didn't. He's been terrible at managing the risks but lucky in that he's fallen off of mountains all over the world but still lives to tell about it.

He said in his one of his books, to paraphrase, that a lot of people he knew, or knew of, had died in their very first mountain climbing accident.

I've survived a lot of risky adventures unscathed and will continue to do them, but wisely. I take calculated risks. I'm not reckless. I always seek a lot of advice and do a lot of research first and when someone who has been there tells me, "I don't think your current approach is a sound strategy" I don't say, "Well I'm gonna try it anyways."

Graveyards are full of people who thought they knew more than they did. Personally I think it's a dumb way to try to make a few extra bucks, considering we live in the wealthiest and safest society in the history of humankind. But at the same time I'd wish you the best if you tried it. As long as a person isn't dragging me into their bad ideas I don't care what they do.

smile.gif

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Patrick C.'s Comment
member avatar

The first $75k is tax free. TBH, most of the time your base pay is setup not to exceed $100k. It is all the additional, non taxable, pays that put you above the $100k mark.

Auggie69's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Look into it. Who knows what the opportunities are nowadays compared to 10 years ago overseas as a contractor. Hell I think even the first 75K or so you earn isn't even taxable.

You'll never know until you apply.

double-quotes-end.png

Auggie are you driving in a war zone? It's a rhetorical question...why encourage someone to do something so dangerous?

Nope, I'm not. I was in the Army for 15 years though so I have a pretty good idea of what goes on :)

Not my job to tell this young man what to do. I encourage everyone to apply for what they want and ONLY decide after the interview if it's for you or not. You ALWAYS take the interview.

Patrick pretty much laid out what happens in a combat zone. I just told the OP how to look into it. It's up to him whether or not he wants to pursue it. I'm not his parent. I'm some dude on the internet that can give him some information on what he's interested in.

As it turns out, Dyncorp wants a year driving experience before they'll hire you. See, right there he'll run into his first road block. One he would not have hit had we all been hysterical in trying to convince him not to drive as a contractor.

Think if it like this: the media breathlessly reports every American killed overseas. When is the last time you heard of a truck driver buying the farm? Yeah, me neither.

2004 - 2011 was different time. Who knows, maybe nowadays you can drive from some supply point to Kandahar, make $150K a year and not worry about anything more than mosquitoes. I know I don't know what goes on over there anymore.

Tell you what though, I may look into this :)

Linden R.'s Comment
member avatar
I'm just trying to seek information on a trucking website about what other companies do offer job overseas

Just saying, this is an American trucking site. Find a good overseas site, maybe learn to read a few new languages. This is TruckingTruth, and we are telling you the truth. Want to go overseas and basically die, for money you could make over here? Be our guest *cues music*. You can make basically just as much money over here if you work hard enough. After a few years, you can make $104,000 a year at Trimac Chemical Transportation. Work a couple of years at other starter companies, get the required endorsements, and you're golden. (by the way looking on preview, i don't know why the entire thing is in italics. sorry.)

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Linden R.'s Comment
member avatar

I was typing as Auggie was. Trimac also needs 1 year, and only a tanker endorsement. Full list of companies over $80,000 a year.

Cory D.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Look into it. Who knows what the opportunities are nowadays compared to 10 years ago overseas as a contractor. Hell I think even the first 75K or so you earn isn't even taxable.

You'll never know until you apply.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Auggie are you driving in a war zone? It's a rhetorical question...why encourage someone to do something so dangerous?

double-quotes-end.png

Nope, I'm not. I was in the Army for 15 years though so I have a pretty good idea of what goes on :)

Not my job to tell this young man what to do. I encourage everyone to apply for what they want and ONLY decide after the interview if it's for you or not. You ALWAYS take the interview.

Patrick pretty much laid out what happens in a combat zone. I just told the OP how to look into it. It's up to him whether or not he wants to pursue it. I'm not his parent. I'm some dude on the internet that can give him some information on what he's interested in.

As it turns out, Dyncorp wants a year driving experience before they'll hire you. See, right there he'll run into his first road block. One he would not have hit had we all been hysterical in trying to convince him not to drive as a contractor.

Think if it like this: the media breathlessly reports every American killed overseas. When is the last time you heard of a truck driver buying the farm? Yeah, me neither.

2004 - 2011 was different time. Who knows, maybe nowadays you can drive from some supply point to Kandahar, make $150K a year and not worry about anything more than mosquitoes. I know I don't know what goes on over there anymore.

Tell you what though, I may look into this :)

Well I already have a year and 4 months of driving experience so that gap is pretty much non-existent.

Auggie69's Comment
member avatar

So then you're halfway home :)

If you apply keep us in the loop during your interview/employment process. I'm curious as to how it works nowadays. The only requirement I would make non-negotiable is to be armed. If they tell you that you can't carry a weapon, walk away.

Cory D.'s Comment
member avatar

So then you're halfway home :)

If you apply keep us in the loop during your interview/employment process. I'm curious as to how it works nowadays. The only requirement I would make non-negotiable is to be armed. If they tell you that you can't carry a weapon, walk away.

Will do, and I'll keep that in mind to ask that question during the interview.

Page 3 of 3 Previous Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More