Switching From Manual To Automactics

Topic 20572 | Page 2

Page 2 of 2 Previous Page Go To Page:
Parrothead66's Comment
member avatar

We're starting a transition this year to automatics and I've read or heard many comments about backing with the auto being the thing that you have to figure out or adjust to the most. So what is it exactly that happens with backing?

Rob's Comment
member avatar

We're starting a transition this year to automatics and I've read or heard many comments about backing with the auto being the thing that you have to figure out or adjust to the most. So what is it exactly that happens with backing?

I just got out of cdl school last week(driving manual) and spent this week training using an auto. Not having to shift is nice for driving in traffic (been primarily delivering downtown) but backing definitely feels different. May just be the truck I'm in but sometimes it jolts when coming to a stop. When backing it doesn't roll on its own like a manual does you must give it fuel, which in turn makes to jolt at first. If you come to a stop it'll do it again. Being new it really is frustrating because I'm taking it slow as I'm still unsure of some situations and it trips our drive cam several times a day because truck gets jerked all over. Actually had a dock we backed into at a hotel that I slammed into due to it jumping. I knew I was close so I eased up and that's when it took off on me. Had the Chef come out screaming at me thinking I destroyed his dock. We addressed the issue with my supervisor and he told us put it in neutral for couple seconds before switching to reverse. We barely noticed a difference to be honest. I'd be interested to know how other drivers handle that.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
MC1371's Comment
member avatar

Thanks guy"s I know I'll get used to it (just hope not too much lol). It kind of surprised how jerky the shifts are thought it would be smoother. I haven't experienced the problem backing or docking. I've heard of lag or where you have to kind of rev it a little to get it to move although that hasn't been the case with this rig. Again it is only a couple weeks. I did get stuck in pretty heavy traffic here in Sacramento both morning and afternoon commute didn't miss the ol clutch then.

I found the best way to get rid of the jerky shifting is not to mash the throttle until it hits at least 9th. About half throttle is about right.

Note, be really easy if bobtail. Then most of the time it acts retarded until about 10th. Running around a large DC just go slow.

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

MC1371's Comment
member avatar

Almost forgot to add.

For those with ACC (adaptive cruise control) be mindful of vehicles exiting in front of you. There are times it will still sense the vehicle and slam on full Jake's if you're not ready to override with the throttle.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

For those with ACC (adaptive cruise control) be mindful of vehicles exiting in front of you. There are times it will still sense the vehicle and slam on full Jake's if you're not ready to override with the throttle.

Mindfulness is such an important activity. Absolutely right (I'm trimming your quote to the essential four words):

be mindful of vehicles

Guessing what any vehicle is about to do is a major part of situational awareness, also known as defensive driving. My nickname for this is Driving Three Cars At Once.

This is done inside your head, and had almost no connection to the Cruise Control.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
MC1371's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

For those with ACC (adaptive cruise control) be mindful of vehicles exiting in front of you. There are times it will still sense the vehicle and slam on full Jake's if you're not ready to override with the throttle.

double-quotes-end.png

Mindfulness is such an important activity. Absolutely right (I'm trimming your quote to the essential four words):

be mindful of vehicles

Guessing what any vehicle is about to do is a major part of situational awareness, also known as defensive driving. My nickname for this is Driving Three Cars At Once.

This is done inside your head, and had almost no connection to the Cruise Control.

You're crazy old man. Swift issues Smart trucks! Just, start and turn when btchn betty says so. The rest of the time, you can text, read,,update Facebook etc.

/off sarcasm :)

I keep forgetting common sense, and that were trying to help beginners

What is obvious for some has to be spelled out for others.

I was just giving warning for that one little nasty surprise that ACC does. If you've got no warning it kinda freaks you out because there is no obvious reason why your truck is rapidly coming to a stop.

**Fun fact, it doesn't even trigger the "Collision imminent" warning. And that lovely piece of tech gets freaked out at freeway signs and stoplights.

Or in old man Errol words. Don't trust / rely on your tech and gizmos. They can and do fail.

Just ask him about when his first triceritops lost a perfectly good horn for no reason.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Johan Broad's Comment
member avatar

As a rookie, I may go to slow for some of the people behind me. However, it's my butt, my job, and my life in the driver's seat. Also, I'm addicted to breathing. Have fun with it.

Thank you!

I just started CDL classes yesterday. I have been reading and watching a lot of forums and videos, and this is the exact attitude I plan to abide by when I get into my own truck!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Jim A.'s Comment
member avatar

Ok got my truck back. Wish I never had that automatic, I kind of liked it. Got used to not shifting, it did lag at times although not that bad. That said I love my truck.

Page 2 of 2 Previous Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More