Two Right Turn Lanes....

Topic 20598 | Page 4

Page 4 of 6 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
Parrothead66's Comment
member avatar

Yes because then you should only have one right turn lane, which is the RH lane. In that case you would want to keep your trailer as close to the curb as you can blocking that lane for a car to pull up on your right. Then when clear swing left and button hook the turn.

If you have 2 right turn lanes, you normally shouldn't need to worry about a car trying to pass on the right, considering both lanes are turning right.

But if the right lane can be used as a through lane, and is not a turn specific lane, then I would think I need to use the right lane. Is this correct?

Chris M's Comment
member avatar

So when a Kentucky DOT officer and I were talking, I asked him for clarification. He came to our school and discussed it. The officer said the main thing is to take your time and protect your blind side from cars trying to sneak past on your right by keeping your trailer close to the curb as you make your turn. He also said if we did not complete a right turn like that, whether one or two turn lanes, we would fail our road test.

Reading this explanation, it sounds like the DOT officer was confused about what you were asking. The fact that he said protect your blind side from cars trying to sneak between your trailer and the curb is what makes me think that.

If there are 2 RH turn lanes, and you are in the outside lane, cars won't be trying to sneak between your trailer and the curb. They will be in the turn lane.

The explanation he gave you, is in reference to a single RH turn lane. You have to protect that side because you are generally going to have to take your tractor wide to make the turn, and in those situations, if you take the trailer wide to start the turn, cars may try to go to your RH side.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

That ATA training video is spot on and anyone is more than welcome to take it up with DOT. As the video states, you have to adjust for the particular turn, but that is the preferred method.

Stay safe and cover your hiney :-)

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

That ATA training video is spot on and anyone is more than welcome to take it up with DOT. As the video states, you have to adjust for the particular turn, but that is the preferred method.

Stay safe and cover your hiney :-)

I'm sorry Susan but you'll have to be patient with me. I just must be slow to catch on. Could you tell me where in that video they mentioned the proper procedure for a right hand turn when there are two turning lanes? I just can't seem to find it anywhere in there, and I've watched that video a couple of times.

Could you help me with that?

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

I thought the video was spot on also...

For executing a single lane right hand turn.

Cornelius A.'s Comment
member avatar

rofl-2.gifrofl-2.gifrofl-2.gifrofl-2.gif just finding it funny that I talked to the owner of Pitt Ohio and now just seeing his truck in the video lol

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Eh.. GTown doesn't really attack anyone. He just tells it like it is. I don't come off as a "warm and fuzzy" person either much of the time.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Susan wrote:

Eh.. GTown doesn't really attack anyone. He just tells it like it is. I don't come off as a "warm and fuzzy" person either much of the time.

Thank you Susan.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

I am never short on words (in unison the entire forum laughs), and at my present station in life nothing really surprises me anymore. But this thread has,… and for several reasons.

The right most lane of a two lane RH turning lane,...nothing has been said will convince me to change how I approach an intersection configured like this. Not a DOT instructor, not a CDL manual and with all due respect Susan, not a successful trainer for West Side Transport. For those of you steadfast in your belief that you are correct, I want to share a piece of reality with you, not intended to judge, "attack", sway or change your mind, but to hopefully make you think about what you are doing and why it might not be "de-facto", prudent operation.

I have said this before, my day typically takes me through some of the most difficult and congested roadways the Northeast has to offer. It's how I make money, so I rely on instincts, experience and most of all common-sense. I recall a scene played out many times in the last five years, crawling in bumper to bumper, gridlocked traffic (no exaggeration) on a Friday afternoon. This particular example was in Saddle Brook, New Jersey while attempting to cross Rt. 46. in order to make my way into the store for a delivery. You see,... North Jersey has numerous very congested divided highways (Rt. 18, Rt. 22, Rt. 9 and of course Rt 46) running through the urban areas of the New York Metro area. The "catch" with all of these roads, it's incredibly rare that you can make a left turn (using a turning lane)...you must use what is called a "Jug Handle", requiring a driver many times to retrace the route in the opposite direction to get to where you need to go. Most of the Jug Handles in this neck of the woods are two or more lanes, very tight, at times with no particular markings or warnings for trucks to stay out of the rightmost lane. I was taught early on to drive the trailer (aka "watch-your-wagon"), which presumes you need to see that which you are attempting to control. Simply put, if I was to place myself in the rightmost lane of one of these two or three lane Jug Handles (like the one in Saddle Brook), the inside right most, very tight radius of the curve is flat-out NOT negotiable with a 53' trailer. I'd argue that it's impossible because these wonderful pieces of human excavation and engineering were designed in the 50's and 60's when 53' trailers were unheard of and only twinkle in the eye of Great Dane, Wabash, and Utility designers. If a driver applies the same approach to this type of road configuration as counter-argued "for" in this thread, "keeping to the right of a two lane RH turning lane" you will get yourself into the type of trouble only the Police are able to safely get you out of. Where do you all think many of the comedic (yet sad) You-Tube videos are shot with trucks dragging poles, traffic lights and trees for blocks behind their trailers? I'll offer a clue, NOT the mid-west.

In Jersey, Pennsylvania, Eastern NY State and to a lessor extent Maryland/Baltimore area, there are numerous roads that are old, very old, designed 50 or more years ago. Roads that if designed with a 53' trailer in mind, would encroach on valuable revenue producing real estate. It's all tightly packed together and definitely NOT truck friendly. That said; on every two lane RH turn lane that I am aware of in these areas, the right most lane has the absolute tightest radius, compounded by the fact it was designed decades before the longer wagons of contemporary commerce existed. Way too tight for a long semi. The basic geometry cannot be dismissed, ignored or explained with text from a poorly written, antiquated manual. There is a very good reason the right most lane of many two lane, RH turning configurations in PA and NJ are protected with highly conspicuous and frequent signage prohibiting trucks from negotiating the turn from that lane. The signs were put there for a reason and they are law. Please be respectful and mindful of this in and around older, highly congested urban centers and do not assume the "road" will comply with what was learned in school, from a CDL manual or a DOT examiner who although must have a CDL, perhaps has never been paid for a single revenue producing mile.

Second, I am extremely passionate about truck driving, especially when it involves safety. There are some who replied to this thread (and will remain nameless, pun intended) that accused me of going on the "attack" in support of that which I know to be true based on years of experience. One of them a pre-student who instead of defending their right to read information that is sugar coated and sweet, should attempt to comprehend the points being presented. To be crystal clear...when anyone insists on being right when I and most of the moderators know, they are mistaken, I will ratchet-up my response to whatever level is necessary to drive home my point. I am extra passionate about this thread's subject because I do not want anyone to get into trouble for believing something that is not true or not advisable. If some of you believe that level of commitment is attacking then I invite you to do whatever you so desire and then, when you are called into the safety department to explain the err of your ways, compare "that conversation" to the one we had in this thread. My goal is for all of us to avoid that type of meeting.

Safe travels.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Here is a principle to follow for all your trailer maneuvering situations. I've actually described it earlier in this post. Go back and look at the diagram I posted, to see the offtracking of the tandems , so far back from where you sit. The safest way to maneuver in a trailer lot, on the highway, and in a left/right turn situation is:

Drive the longest route possible, even longer by inches.

The tandems will always take a shortcut, so you must "drag" them out from cutting turns. Do not drive a truck like you're driving a car. Watch those tandems on any turn (use the "inside-the-turn" mirrors. Yes, this means taking the outer of two turn lanes if you have the chance.

If I have to start a tight turn, I will even move the truck to touch the paint of the outer lane line, just to get three inches more space for the turn.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Page 4 of 6 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Safe Driving Tips Truck Driver Safety Understanding The Laws
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More