Company Change Suggestions?

Topic 20634 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Keeks's Comment
member avatar

Hello all,

I've been with the Swift Family Dollar/Dollar Tree Dedicated run for almost a year. Either way I will be completing my year within a few months. I thoroughly enjoy the extremes of this job, physical activity, backing challenges, weather challenges to work in. I have zero accidents on my record since i have been here and i am meticulous in details and professionalism which have been recognized and noted by the company and the contractor.

However, this being my first year in trucking i have no idea what my next job would best assist in my goals. My next objective is to switch to OTR and do this for a solid 2-3yrs.

Right now im earning around $800-$1100 a week.

I have 3 objectives im looking to achieve listed in priority first.

- bring my wife along with me. (As a passenger she is not a cdl holder) - better income - get back to Utah for wife's family events to drop her off occasionally

(Children are not a factor) (Family for me is not a factor) (Home base is not a major factor)

Any ideas, suggestions, companies i might direct my attention to are sincerely appreciated. If anyone is with Swifts OTR, and has experienced their pay i would be interested in knowing that if your willing.

Thanks all.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dedicated Run:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Welcome Gabriel. That's an awesome achievement considering the difficulty of Dollar General. Congratulations on that accomplishment.

I am a Swift Dedicated driver on Walmart in the North East, although not OTR , the money is great. My suggestion is to give Swift a chance; ask about OTR Dedicated accounts like MillerCoors, Kohls, Weyerhauser, etc.

Check your Voice Your Choice App through you phone or the Swift portal. You'll can see all the Dedicated Accounts in your region.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Linden R.'s Comment
member avatar

Well, the Dollar Store accounts are always the worst for Rookies, but considering you survived the year with it and actually enjoyed it, that's an achievement! I'd recommend what G-Town recommended; Move around within the company. Some accounts pay more, most are less difficult than the one you're on. If you don't like any of those, seeing as you are already in a good big company, there are other big companies with different accounts! I know Werner has some interesting ones, as well as Schneider. Prime is good if you want to go OTR , as is Roehl if you care about home time. So look around, indeed.com has some good listings. Or, like I earlier mentioned, stay where you are but change it up a bit.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Big Scott's Comment
member avatar

I'm with CFI and I love them. However, Swift is a great company. They have so many opportunities, from dedicated, to regional , intermodal , OTR , local, and more. Dry van , refer, and flatbed. So many options in one company. Plus you have spent a year there building a great reputation and rapore with the company. Why start over at the bottom someplace new. As G-Town said look within the company first. Good luck and I hope some other Swifties add to this.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Another Swift, here. It's great you happily survived one of the toughest trucking assignments with the dollar store account. Now you can really take it easy.

I'm heading into my third year at Swift. In my first year I ran OTR , Georgia Pacific dedicated (home weekends!) and Express Shuttle (home daily). Swift has many other driver assignments you might like. They all have their pluses and minuses.

Talk to your DM or FM to find out more. Then you won't need to do another orientation.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
MC1371's Comment
member avatar

Are you looking to stay OTR? Not knocking Swift, I run regional and am quite happy with the pay and work.

But if I were looking to get back into OTR Crete has an excellent OTR package. .46, 3 weeks out, 3 days home and I believe their benefits are slightly cheaper. I have a couple of academy friends that jumped to them at the 8mo mark (No retraining required).

But like others have said, ask your DM what's available. GeorgiaPacific, Del Monte both come to mind.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

I'm always a big fan of remaining with a company if at all reasonably possible. Once you have some time in with a company and you've developed a great reputation there will be a lot of "secret doors" opening for you that most drivers won't know about.

Every major carrier has a ton of small accounts that require top notch drivers. Most of the company won't even know these accounts exists. If you really talk around within the company to management like terminal managers and operations managers you might dig up some real gems.

I also wouldn't leave a company over just a few cents per mile. People think, "Hey, it's only 5 cpm but that really adds up!" Yeah, that's true, assuming you're going to get the same number of miles and you're treated just as well at your new company. At the new company you're not going to be given any of those "secret gem" accounts that no one knows about. You don't have any reputation or relationships established so you have no leverage to make things happen the way you do at the place you're established. In other words, if mileage slows you can't just call the fleet manager or terminal manager and get things fixed in an instant the way you can when you're established somewhere.

Personally, I wouldn't jump ship unless you're getting at least 8 cpm more and you've absolutely exhausted every possibility where you're at. And with Swift, they're going to have 8,000 opportunities available all over the place. You should do a lot of digging before you decide that leaving the company is your best option.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

millionmiler24's Comment
member avatar

Hello all,

I've been with the Swift Family Dollar/Dollar Tree Dedicated run for almost a year. Either way I will be completing my year within a few months. I thoroughly enjoy the extremes of this job, physical activity, backing challenges, weather challenges to work in. I have zero accidents on my record since i have been here and i am meticulous in details and professionalism which have been recognized and noted by the company and the contractor.

However, this being my first year in trucking i have no idea what my next job would best assist in my goals. My next objective is to switch to OTR and do this for a solid 2-3yrs.

Right now im earning around $800-$1100 a week.

I have 3 objectives im looking to achieve listed in priority first.

- bring my wife along with me. (As a passenger she is not a cdl holder) - better income - get back to Utah for wife's family events to drop her off occasionally

(Children are not a factor) (Family for me is not a factor) (Home base is not a major factor)

Any ideas, suggestions, companies i might direct my attention to are sincerely appreciated. If anyone is with Swifts OTR, and has experienced their pay i would be interested in knowing that if your willing.

Thanks all.

I cant emphasize this enough: Stay with Swift. You have been with the LARGEST trucking company in this country with the MOST opportunities available. You did your first year on one of the toughest accounts Swift has with no foul ups or mistakes. To me that speaks volumes to me that you truly are an amazing person and driver. Look at what you want to do with your trucking career now and I can GUARANTEE it and I am sure the other Swifties on this forum will back me up on this one: whatever you are lookin for Swift has it. Brett and the other Moderators on here are 100% right: stay with Swift but change accounts WITHIN the company if you so desire.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dedicated Run:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More