Part Time On Call

Topic 20652 | Page 1

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Sno-boy's Comment
member avatar

Got my CDL late June of this year, been running 36 to 44 hours average a week for a medium sized logistics company hauling for a dedicated company. Probably got close to 10,000 miles solo by myself. My question is, down the road how do I "prove" my miles/experience to apply for other positions other than this company? Does my driving appear on my DAC automatically or what exactly how does information get on your DAC report or is this only for violations and such ? Thanks in advance for the replies.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Bill F.'s Comment
member avatar

Your miles/time on the road will be verified by the hiring company contacting the company you are currently working for and asking them. DAC is more for accidents/incidents and is updated by the companies. If you put DAC in the search bar at the top of the page you should be able to find info on how to get a copy of it.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Companies that report to DAC generally do report your miles too. If your running more local, often, that local experience won't count with an OTR company. My company will hire experienced local drivers and let them go OTR but I don't think that's the norm in this industry.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Sno-boy's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the heads-up.

Your miles/time on the road will be verified by the hiring company contacting the company you are currently working for and asking them. DAC is more for accidents/incidents and is updated by the companies. If you put DAC in the search bar at the top of the page you should be able to find info on how to get a copy of it.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Sno-boy's Comment
member avatar

So like 250 miles out (500 RT) is considered local then? I am wanting to run out a day take my 10 on the road and then back or even 2 days out then back so my 500 mile RT's might not open those type of jobs doors ?? Thanks.

Companies that report to DAC generally do report your miles too. If your running more local, often, that local experience won't count with an OTR company. My company will hire experienced local drivers and let them go OTR but I don't think that's the norm in this industry.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Local is local. It sounds like you're doing a part time OTR/regional. Now if you were say running around doing loads nearby all day, starting and ending in the same place, that would be local.

For instance I'm an OTR driver. I go anywhere my company sends me whether that's east, west, Midwest, southeast, etc. The other day I had an appointment to get my truck serviced so the day before, they had me running as a local driver. I drove about 98 miles running a load of scrap into the local paper mill dropping that, and then hooking to a load of tall paper rolls and dropping that in one of our in town drop yards... Grab another load of scrap, take to mill, grab rolls, take to our yard, rinse and repeat. I did about 10 rounds during my shift.

The day my truck was at freightliner, I took a spinner truck and dropped a load at our South St. Paul terminal and grabbed one needing to come back to Cedar Rapids. About 550 miles round trip. That's what my company calls hub or flex. Each day I began and ended my shift at our cedar rapids terminal. Day 3 I went to our Chicago terminal and back. Those were technically all "local runs".

If you are staying out overnight that would be OTR/regional... Just working part time. I would think (due to reduced miles of part time) that as far as months or years of experience, they'd credit you with half the time.. Say instead of 6 months experience, they'd say you have 3 months, but I'm really not sure. Different companies may look at it different ways.

I hope that helps a little in trying to make heads or tails out of it.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Sno-boy's Comment
member avatar

I do return to my home base most all nights (other than once I stayed out) so this clears up the possibilities of other positions offered most likely won't recognize my experience. Worst they can do if I apply is tell me "no" eh ?? Thanks to you (and others) for the info, I was not sure what DAC's were all about and such.

Local is local. It sounds like you're doing a part time OTR/regional. Now if you were say running around doing loads nearby all day, starting and ending in the same place, that would be local.

For instance I'm an OTR driver. I go anywhere my company sends me whether that's east, west, Midwest, southeast, etc. The other day I had an appointment to get my truck serviced so the day before, they had me running as a local driver. I drove about 98 miles running a load of scrap into the local paper mill dropping that, and then hooking to a load of tall paper rolls and dropping that in one of our in town drop yards... Grab another load of scrap, take to mill, grab rolls, take to our yard, rinse and repeat. I did about 10 rounds during my shift.

The day my truck was at freightliner, I took a spinner truck and dropped a load at our South St. Paul terminal and grabbed one needing to come back to Cedar Rapids. About 550 miles round trip. That's what my company calls hub or flex. Each day I began and ended my shift at our cedar rapids terminal. Day 3 I went to our Chicago terminal and back. Those were technically all "local runs".

If you are staying out overnight that would be OTR/regional... Just working part time. I would think (due to reduced miles of part time) that as far as months or years of experience, they'd credit you with half the time.. Say instead of 6 months experience, they'd say you have 3 months, but I'm really not sure. Different companies may look at it different ways.

I hope that helps a little in trying to make heads or tails out of it.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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