Overlength

Topic 20681 | Page 1

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Unholychaos's Comment
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Picking up a relay in Louisville KY, scale ticket reads 11100 32160 33840 77100, 43' mark on the trailer is in front of the rear axle (towards the nose of the trailer). According to my permit book, the legal length for the states I'm going through, IN and IL, is 43' and 42.5' from kingpin to center of rear axle. So I'm overlength, the load originated in Cincinnati OH. 14h clock ticking away, getting late, waiting for claims department to give me further instructions... ugh...

Cwc's Comment
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Is your 5th wheel fixed or sliding?

Cwc's Comment
member avatar

If your not doing anything but waiting. Slide your 5th wheel forward and you should be able to slide your tandems a little bit more.

Otherwise your down to creative route planning.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

SIlent Bob's Comment
member avatar

Why not just slide the tandems forward take some weight off the tandems and move it to the drives? Is 4-5 holes not enough to hit the mark you need? Or am I missing something?

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Illinois is 45'6" from KP to center of rear axle, so you are okay there. Indiana, is unfortunately correct.

How far in front is it in front of the center of the rear axle? Couple of inches?

Sliding the fifth wheel will not accomplish moving weight off the tandems , only the drives. In order to move the weight off the tandelms to the drives requires sliding them further to the rear. Which puts him further away from the 43' mark.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Cwc's Comment
member avatar

He definitely has some wiggle room..

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

He definitely has some wiggle room..

Definitely? Please explain. Moving the fifth wheel forward will not help.

Unless his slide rail is a micro set, sliding one hole towards the front of the trailer, closer to the 43' mark will put him over 34k.

Unholychaos's Comment
member avatar

My fifth wheel is all the way forward, tandem weight is 33840 with the 43' mark in front of the rear axle. There's no way to make it legal (that I'm aware of) short of getting product taken off.

G-Town, took a 2nd look at the permit book and you're correct about IL, for national routes, but for state routes, it's 42'6". Since this is relevant, what's the difference when it says "National and Designated Routes" and "State and Non-Designated Routes?"

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

National routes are definitely Interstates and I think US highways like 1 and 30. A state route is a numbered route like PA-61 or NJ 18. I checked my book and I don't see interstate vs state/local route restrictions.

Not sure if you saw my question how far off the 43' mark are you?

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

SIlent Bob's Comment
member avatar

Never mind I'm thinking opposites again

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