Overlength

Topic 20681 | Page 2

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Chris M's Comment
member avatar

Why not just slide the tandems forward take some weight off the tandems and move it to the drives? Is 4-5 holes not enough to hit the mark you need? Or am I missing something?

Sliding the tandems forward takes weight off of the drives and puts more on the tandems.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Bump...c'mon back UHC.

National routes are definitely Interstates and I think US highways like 1 and 30. A state route is a numbered route like PA-61 or NJ 18. I checked my book and I don't see interstate vs state/local route restrictions.

Not sure if you saw my question how far off the 43' mark are you?

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Depending on what you're hauling (nothing breakable), I've actually slammed on the brakes several times to get a load to pack and slide forward so I could slide my tandems forward a hole or 2 to make it legal. It helped that I was hauling scrap paper for international paper those times. I let dispatch and safety know I'd be setting off a hard brake event. I did this in a back isle at a truck stop..got it up to 5th or 6th gear and slammed the brakes as hard as I could. It worked lol but I don't recommend doing this with anything breakable.

Another thought is if you slide your 5th wheel all the way back, it would put a little more of that weight on your drives, possibly allowing you to slide your tandems up slightly.

Be very careful. Tomorrow 9/07 is cvsa brake safety check day nationwide so DOT is going to be out and about.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Unholychaos's Comment
member avatar

Bump...c'mon back UHC.

double-quotes-start.png

National routes are definitely Interstates and I think US highways like 1 and 30. A state route is a numbered route like PA-61 or NJ 18. I checked my book and I don't see interstate vs state/local route restrictions.

Not sure if you saw my question how far off the 43' mark are you?

double-quotes-end.png

To answer your question, I would have had to slide my tandems forward 1 hole, MAYBE 2, to make it legal length, but then that would've put me overweight on the tandems.

But after dealing with claims and overnight dispatcher (ugh....), I'm supposedly getting taken off the load. But we'll find out what 1st shift says....

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Unholychaos's Comment
member avatar

Depending on what you're hauling (nothing breakable), I've actually slammed on the brakes several times to get a load to pack and slide forward so I could slide my tandems forward a hole or 2 to make it legal. It helped that I was hauling scrap paper for international paper those times. I let dispatch and safety know I'd be setting off a hard brake event. I did this in a back isle at a truck stop..got it up to 5th or 6th gear and slammed the brakes as hard as I could. It worked lol but I don't recommend doing this with anything breakable.

Another thought is if you slide your 5th wheel all the way back, it would put a little more of that weight on your drives, possibly allowing you to slide your tandems up slightly.

Be very careful. Tomorrow 9/07 is cvsa brake safety check day nationwide so DOT is going to be out and about.

And yes, that DOT check going on today is a big reason why I was fighting the legality of this trailer. Overlength? Problem. Overweight by ~90lbs, MAYBE they'd let it slide, but not without clearing an inspection with flying colors.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

What is the product? Can you get in the trailer and move some of it by hand somehow? I've done that before.

Unholychaos's Comment
member avatar

What is the product? Can you get in the trailer and move some of it by hand somehow? I've done that before.

Trailer is sealed, paper product, heavy a hell, I'm a scrawny little s**t. Ain't no way in hell I'm moving anything.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

UHC...glad you at least have a solution for this.

I know this may not be the time to ask,...but I think you have been faced with a tail heavy load before, and one of my suggestions to you in another thread was to align how your load is balanced with the state's kingpin you are routed through. IN and IL are a perfect example of something road legal on one state (IL) is not legal in an adjoining state (IN). Same exact problem can easily occur with OH to PA or PA to MD. Kingpin law is a state mandated compliance, know the laws in each state before you scale the load. If you cannot make it legal, make sure that's communicated to your dispatcher/driver manager before continuing. Worst case scenario, you'll return to the shipper so they can move the freight around or off. In addition as you develop a "set of shipper tendencies", you will begin to know where a messy load is expected and prepare accordingly.

It's all a learning experience. Letting your company handle this was the right thing to do.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Big Scott's Comment
member avatar

When I was with my trainer we had a load of beverages that had to be reworked. We had to drive about 50 miles each way to the scale and back. By the time they reworked it and we reweighed the next day we could have taken more. Don't know why they couldn't do it right the first time. Also, he said something to his DM and got us a dispatch for the scale miles so we got paid for those miles.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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