15 Years In A WAL-MART Central Receiving Office Here

Topic 20685 | Page 2

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Tim F.'s Comment
member avatar

Wow! I never experienced this at the Walmart DCs. Most if our deliveries were drop and hook. The only DC we live unloaded was in Macclenney FL...and they were usually efficient in getting us out of there...within the two hour window. I've always told shippers/receivers who were having a bad day and thanked me for being patient....would yelling at them make anything better...probably not.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

Wow! I never experienced this at the Walmart DCs. Most if our deliveries were drop and hook. The only DC we live unloaded was in Macclenney FL...and they were usually efficient in getting us out of there...within the two hour window. I've always told shippers/receivers who were having a bad day and thanked me for being patient....would yelling at them make anything better...probably not.

Unfortunately yelling, arguing, and throwing a temper tantrum are way too commom amongst truckers.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Daniel wrote:

Unfortunately yelling, arguing, and throwing a temper tantrum are way too commom amongst truckers

That behavior is unfortunately expected and assumed to be SOP making it all the more difficult for those of us NOT behaving like a juvenile. I've been thanked many times for being patient and acting professional.

Not defending Walmart, but if not for them many of us wouldn't have it so good. When considering the amount of loads they assemble and ship during a 24 hour period, it borders on miraculous. At least on my side of the house; outbound to stores, the drivers don't experience near the delays or issues as on the receiving side.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

Daniel wrote:

double-quotes-start.png

Unfortunately yelling, arguing, and throwing a temper tantrum are way too commom amongst truckers

double-quotes-end.png

That behavior is unfortunately expected and assumed to be SOP making it all the more difficult for those of us NOT behaving like a juvenile. I've been thanked many times for being patient and acting professional.

Not defending Walmart, but if not for them many of us wouldn't have it so good. When considering the amount of loads they assemble and ship during a 24 hour period, it borders on miraculous. At least on my side of the house; outbound to stores, the drivers don't experience near the delays or issues as on the receiving side.

I took advantage of it. I cant tell you how many times I have been given priority over someone who checked in before me just because I behaved like a normal human.

Truckers complain to the clerks but without realizing that its completely counter-productive for them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

MC1371's Comment
member avatar

Actually, no complaints about the DCs I've been to. Store deliveries... Don't get me started.

But, as a regional my prime customer is Costco the difference is night and day.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

MC1371 wrote about Walmart:

Store deliveries... Don't get me started.

Or me either, it's how I make a very good living. Just like Sushi...you either love it or hate it.

ACO476's Comment
member avatar

To answer your question about non-English speaking drivers; I'm almost positive that you can bring along a translator during your DMV written and driving test. I could be wrong though. I'll look up the law when I get a chance...

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

ACO476's Comment
member avatar

To answer your question about non-English speaking drivers; I'm almost positive that you can bring along a translator during your DMV written and driving test. I could be wrong though. I'll look up the law when I get a chance...

And I was wrong, concerning Texas anyway since that is where I obtained my CDL. Apparently you only need to be able to understand hand signals. Must be quite frightful for road testers!

https://www.dps.texas.gov/DriverLicense/translators.htm

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Eric B.'s Comment
member avatar

Yeah some drivers just come in yelling from the very start. Every day I get a call from the guard shack warning me that a driver is coming in screaming. But for the most part the check ins are good. It's not until we pass the 2 hour LOS or take 2 hours to unload 1 pallet or a straight pull that we start to get the heat from the drivers. I've known some of the same drivers, our regulars for over 10 years and have family members that have driven trucks and ask about their life on the road so I sympathise and I'm always on the side of the driver when they have issues that we have created.

Eric B.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

To answer your question about non-English speaking drivers; I'm almost positive that you can bring along a translator during your DMV written and driving test. I could be wrong though. I'll look up the law when I get a chance...

double-quotes-end.png

And I was wrong, concerning Texas anyway since that is where I obtained my CDL. Apparently you only need to be able to understand hand signals. Must be quite frightful for road testers!

https://www.dps.texas.gov/DriverLicense/translators.htm

I can only imagine lol

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

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