Prime Walmart Dedicated (Lewiston, ME)

Topic 20695 | Page 1

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Kat's Comment
member avatar

Anyone here on this account? I have questions.... I am still OTR but exploring the dedicated option.

1. I'm running my first store load out of here tonight, and I have looked at the satellite views of the locations I will be going. Two out of the three have no place to turn around behind or beside their building, and the docks are in two sets...the one you can set up for depends on the way you go in behind the store. Do you just choose a spot or do they tell you which to pull into?

2. As an OTR driver, I am paid 0.425 per mile. I hear that the dedicated account pays something like 0.56 per mile. Is that accurate? Do OTR drivers running required local loads out of here get paid the dedicated rate for those loads? Also, is there a guaranteed amount attached to dedicated accounts since they obviously don't get the same mileage as OTR drivers?

3. Do you have to live near a DC to run dedicated?

4. Can dedicated be run on a temporary basis or do you have to commit to be permanent? I would love to run an account like this in months other than winter. Not sure I could do months of dealing with snow and ice up here.

I am scared of store parking lots and maneuvering through them. Please say a prayer for me tonight. It's time I got over this fear, but geez it's hard!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Kat's Comment
member avatar

Oh...one more...

5. Do they make you change fleet managers if you want to do dedicated? I really love mine and have no desire to leave his board. ❤️

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Kat, I run Walmart Dedicated for Swift. I'll answer everything but the specific CPM pay questions...the process for store deliveries is the same no matter what transportation partner you drive for; Swift, Prime doesn't matter. Search on G-Town Walmart and you will be able see/read most everything I have written on the subject, specifically to Miss Miyoshi. Hopefully she will chime in because she was running WM Dedicted for Prime in New England.

When you are physically dispatched at the D.C., you will get a stack of documents paper clipped together. The top one is where you will find specific directions on exactly how to get to the dock and which one (likely grocery, aka GRC) you are to use. If a store has two different, separate dock areas; one is GM the other is Grocery. Fairly certain you are grocery, so make sure you spot on the GRC dock. If marked GM, that's likely not your spot.

I can't specify your CPM rate at Prime but in addition to that you may also get stop pay for every store delivery beyond the first one.

You don't need to live near the D.C. but it helps because you will get one day off for every 6 you work.

Expect to burn through 85-95% of your 14 each day and about 90-95% of your 70 at the end of day 6.

You will not have the same dispatcher/driver manager at Walmart. Once you arrive at the D.C., you will meet who you should report to.

At least for Swift, Dedicated can be temporary, called surge. Once you get to know the account and if you are good at it, they will try to keep you there.

When at the store try to relax. It's likely you will be the only truck there, take you time, careful of all the stuff leading up to the dock and the yellow polls protecting immovable objects they don't want damaged. Take your time.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Kat, just checked, Lewiston is a Grocery DC. They will have you running dry loads and eventually perishable (reefer). If and when you are assigned a reefer load ask for help on how to operate the unit, how to raise/lower/secure the two sets of movable bulkheads that separate the three temp. zones and how to oversee the unloading-reloading process for intermixed, consolidated loads. Hopefully they won't assign a reefer run to you day 1.

Bulkhead:

A strong wall-like structure placed at the front of a flatbed trailer (or on the rear of the tractor) used to protect the driver against shifting cargo during a front-end collision. May also refer to any separator within a dry or liquid trailer (also called a baffle for liquid trailers) used to partition the load.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Kat's Comment
member avatar

Thanks! That info helps some. Prime drivers coming into Lewiston with a load are required to do at least one store run before you get another OTR load, so this is my first time dealing with this. Was told that there is a shortage of dedicated drivers out of this DC, and the guy in dispatch here said I could hang around if I liked it. Just not sure I would want something routine...at least not long term. I enjoy the variety of places and loads with OTR. I wouldn't mind giving it a go if tonight isn't a nightmare, especially if there is an opportunity to make a little more.

smile.gif

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Just request they explain the paper work process and how to handle yourself at the store. Different then what you are familiar with running OTR.

Good luck.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Kat, ill.message Miss Myoshi who did that route and have her answer. She lives in VA at the time. At one point all drivers had to have LW but I know a couple who recently did it in a condo.

I know OTR drivers who temporarily got assigned to Lewiston. You do keep your FM but as G Town said, you get dispatched from Lewiston not your FM Also, I've been there several times and not once did I have to make a store run to get out.

All of the weight balancing and most QC is for for you. You can fuel and washout out at the DC. Parking is easier. The area is harder...tight turns and such

Ask your FM if you can try it for a month or so to see how you like it. Some of the stores have messed up backing situations I still wouldn't want to deal with lol

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

By far the worst loads to do as a L/O. Burned your entire clock and paid peanuts.

That's all I can say because I never went back

smile.gif

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Rainy wrote:

Ask your FM if you can try it for a month or so to see how you like it. Some of the stores have messed up backing situations I still wouldn't want to deal with lol

The possible difference is the timing for Kat trying it for a month. Once into October Walmart DC store activity increases dramatically and continues, peaking the week after New Year's Day. It's our busiest time.

My suggestion to Kat is try a couple of loads before committing to anything like a month, because the month could easily turn into three. If Prime has a driver shortage running Wally, they may need Kat through the holiday season. It's the kind of thing that is not for everyone...you either love it or hate it. She'll know rather quickly if it's appealing, or appalling.

As far as pay...can't comment on that because I am only familiar how we get paid at our terminal/DC. Even that varies between surge and the drivers committed/dedicated to the account. Starting first year is 46cpm, $20 flat dispatch fee, $15 per stop after the first. There is also a $10 trailer spotting fee if there is a need for moving empty trailers around at the larger stores. A 4 stop, 300 mile run (about average) earns a $200 payday. For a new driver that will likely take 12 hours to complete. Gotta hustle and learn how to get in and out of each store quickly, safely and efficiently.

The trick is to get back to the D.C. every day so a driver starts with a fresh clock. Another important point is if there is no less than 4 hours left on the 14, request another, shorter run. Since Walmart is just-in-time dispatch the available loads cycle throughout the day, even more so when it's a busy season. Maximizing the time and grabbing another load is key to making great money on this account. It's not uncommon for an experienced hand to return to the D.C. after a second run with mere minutes remaining on their 14. But taking out two loads during a shift can easily gross $300+ pay for the effort. So it's possible with a year plus of experience to consistent $1200-1250 paychecks for a 6 day work week. And the loads, they never stop, so the inconsistent pay isn't an issue running this type of Dedicated Account. If you are really good at it, learn all the tricks, and bust your hump, 70k per year is possible.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Kat...how did you do?

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