Need Help Beginner Tanker Here!

Topic 20705 | Page 1

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Kyle Y.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello everyone, I was approved by Schneider to start out and begin as a tanker. I still do not have anything done and am currently waiting for my Texas DL to come in the mail (transfering from Florida DL).

Now I understood I need an HME to haul dangerous liquids/gases and a TWIC to access ports and secured locations, both of those are done at the TSA right? Right now I have a temporary paper license until the hard copy comes in the mail.

I'm a little confused about the whole process...do I begin and finish the CDL-A tests, then finish the HME (through the TSA) and afterwards TWIC (through the TSA)...the DMV told me I need to finish the medical DOT in order to do the CDL-A test and Schneider told me to finish only the HAZMAT and CDL-A tests and that the medical and the HME will be covered through them,I guess while in training...?

Please help haha I'm confused lol, Thanks in advance!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bud A.'s Comment
member avatar

I have never worked for them, but I am sure that Schneider will walk you through the process of getting the endorsements and the TWIC card.

The connection between the TWIC and the hazmat endorsement is that both require your fingerprints for an FBI background check to make sure you're not on their list. In some states (I think there are six or seven of them), you can combine the fingerprinting process for both the TWIC and hazmat endorsement, which saves you something like $86 and a little bit of hassle.

Also, you will not be given a hazmat endorsement until you have your CDL in hand. In some states, you can take the written test for hazmat when you are getting your permit. The endorsement will not be added until you actually get through the rest of the steps to get your CDL and the background check is completed, but it saves you the stress of taking tests on two different days. (No need to stress, though -- just use the High Road to prepare and you'll pass, no problem!)

So, again, the folks at Schneider know all this. They'll help you get the medical certificate done, apparently, from what you've said, and they want you to pass the hazmat endorsement test. They probably have people that will walk you through the TWIC process as well. Just take a deep breath, listen to what they want you to do, then do it. And focus on learning to control the truck and especially on how to pull a tanker.

You don't have to become an expert on the paperwork, you just need to make sure you have what you need to do the job. You do need to become an expert at controlling the truck and handling the cargo you'll be hauling, so I would recommend that you spend your energy on that.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Kyle Y.'s Comment
member avatar

I have never worked for them, but I am sure that Schneider will walk you through the process of getting the endorsements and the TWIC card.

The connection between the TWIC and the hazmat endorsement is that both require your fingerprints for an FBI background check to make sure you're not on their list. In some states (I think there are six or seven of them), you can combine the fingerprinting process for both the TWIC and hazmat endorsement, which saves you something like $86 and a little bit of hassle.

Also, you will not be given a hazmat endorsement until you have your CDL in hand. In some states, you can take the written test for hazmat when you are getting your permit. The endorsement will not be added until you actually get through the rest of the steps to get your CDL and the background check is completed, but it saves you the stress of taking tests on two different days. (No need to stress, though -- just use the High Road to prepare and you'll pass, no problem!)

So, again, the folks at Schneider know all this. They'll help you get the medical certificate done, apparently, from what you've said, and they want you to pass the hazmat endorsement test. They probably have people that will walk you through the TWIC process as well. Just take a deep breath, listen to what they want you to do, then do it. And focus on learning to control the truck and especially on how to pull a tanker.

You don't have to become an expert on the paperwork, you just need to make sure you have what you need to do the job. You do need to become an expert at controlling the truck and handling the cargo you'll be hauling, so I would recommend that you spend your energy on that.

Thanks for replying man, it is a bit more clearer now. So today I went to get the fingerprints done for the Hazmat - TSA and apparently the location doesn't do that but only TWIC. I called the phone number they provided (888-467-2080) and they asked for a UE ID which I have no clue on how to get. After driving to the DPS again, they said I can't even start the Hazmat procedure before I finish the CDL A written tests and in order to do the written test I will need to get the DOT medical physical test done (which Schneider said will be done through them?)...I guess I'll just do the physical test and hope Schneider reimburses me...

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Pete B.'s Comment
member avatar

Kyle, Schneider is not going to walk you through this. I know because I went through the same thing during my training. I had to get my license transferred from Montana to Texas, take the Texas hazmat endorsement test, get fingerprinted for my hazmat endorsement... During the first 31 days of the bulk training program, I was given one day to drive to Austin to try and take care of it. Of course there was a problem in the DPS office I went into, so it did not all get resolved in one day. After I began running solo, I really had to stay on my driver business leader to get me back to Texas to complete the process.

After you begin Schneider's bulk training program, you will have two good opportunities to get this worked out. The first will be just before you go on the road with your TE; they should be able to give you one day (Monday) to take care of this business, and the second opportunity will be after you finish your SQT, and before you begin running solo. You should get one or two days off at that time to wrap up any loose ends.

In Texas, the HAZMAT fingerprinting is done by appointment, with one exception; there is a DPS office in Austin that accepts walk-ins.

I highly recommend going into any DPS office and getting as many phone numbers and answers as possible (such as your question about the UE ID number)...( which is an identification number assigned to you once you pass your hazmat endorsement test)... attempting to get information using their phone system is an absolute nightmare.

I can't speak about getting a TWIC card in Texas; I applied for and received mine while in Montana, and it follows you from state to state, unlike your CDL. But having been through Schneider's bulk training program, again, this is not something they're going to help you with. You need to figure out how and when to get this done around your training.

Good luck, I hope to run into you sometime. And not with my truck.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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