Why Do So Many People Get Booted Out Of Trucking? This Is Why...

Topic 20731 | Page 1

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Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

If someone stops using our High Road CDL Training Program I'll send them an email to see if everything is ok and ask if they're having any problems with the program. I just got this response:

Hi Bret,

Sorry I don't really like your HR training program.

I don't like being forced to keep reviewing things that I don't care about or need/want to learn.

I don't need to memorize the entire manual, I just need to pass the tests.

wtf.gif

So this fella is getting ready to drive an 80,000 pound death machine surrounded by innocent children but he doesn't need to learn the materials, he just needs to pass the tests, as if passing a test means you've done enough.

He doesn't like to be "forced to learn". Poor guy. Life is tough.

So I explain to him that he does indeed need to know the materials and that passing the test isn't enough to know how to do this job safely and he says:

No I don't need to memorize what is required to get a class D drivers license.

Take your **** poor attitude and shove it. F*** you and your site...

rofl-3.gif

As if that wasn't bad enough, not 10 minutes before this (seriously, is there something in the air today?) a guy sends me a message saying the program keeps making him review the same questions. I told him it's because he kept missing one of the questions. In fact, he missed it four times!

His response:

I can assure you I didn't miss a question four times

So I pulled up his scores and here is a screenshot. If you'll look at the chart at the bottom right it shows he was 3 for 7 on one of the questions, meaning he missed it four times. So I assured him that yes indeed he did miss a question four times.

1505345950.4606.jpg

So you tell me - why do 25% of the people who attend these Company-Sponsored Training Programs wind up on a bus home within three days? Because about 25% of the people who show up act like arrogant, know-it-all jerks.

Of course some of these types do make it through training but they mostly go on to become terminal rats:

Episode 10: Terminal Rats Are Derailing Trucking Careers

Rule #1 in life: Don't be a jerk

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Stacy M-Yellow Wolf's Comment
member avatar

Yikes! Here is to hoping that he doesn't ever make it into a truck. I just do not get what is wrong with some people. Having an attitude just makes your life harder in every way. 😯

Fatsquatch 's Comment
member avatar

Unfortunately, this is how kids are "taught" to "learn" nowadays. The requirement to actually learn and retain went out about the same time as leg warmers and break dancing.

Three cheers for the deliberate defunding of public education.

Kenny M.'s Comment
member avatar

I used your training program, and I passed with tanker. So much better than falling asleep to the Oregon CDL manual. ( which I did read through it a few times)

Love this site, so glad you and your moderators are here.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Big Scott's Comment
member avatar

I think the High Road Training Program is the best free system to learn what you need to pass the test. I went through it, then reset my score and started again. I passed my written test with ease. Used it again to study for my hazmat and tanker endorsements. Passed them with ease as well. When I have to renew them I will use it once again. Some people are just idiots.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Deke's Comment
member avatar

Big Scott,

I'm doing the same thing now. I may even reset it one more time after this. I think the high road program, combined with the practice tests are the best thing out there. It is a proven fact that we learn better when things are presented in different ways....or from different "angles" so to speak.

There are different levels of learning. This guy is only interested in reaching the first level or what is called the "rote" level so that he can spit out the right answers. Unfortunately, while a rote level may let you pass a test, you still may not understand the material. Understanding the material is critical in order to be able to apply it in the real world. Which apparently our hero in question is not interested in doing. The scary thing is we will be driving the same roads as these idiots.....

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Sorry I don't really like your HR training program.

I don't like being forced to keep reviewing things that I don't care about or need/want to learn.

I don't need to memorize the entire manual, I just need to pass the tests.

It's funny how some people approach this career - like they are just going into a new fast food restaurant for another average job that can be done by any average person. All they think they really need is the license, so they can get started - merely a formality!

I've said it before Brett, but somewhere during the time that I struggled my way through the High Road Training Program's section on the log book rules, a light bulb lit up in my brain. I suddenly saw the path to success as a professional driver.

Those principles of time management that were formed in my mind during those early days of struggling to grasp the log book rules have continued to be developed and perfected as I'm out here doing this at the top levels of success. That whole time that I spent in the training materials provided here was fundamentally foundational to my future success at this. I still remember thinking, "I can't believe this course of study is free!"

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

The High Road Training program was the most helpful thing, because of it i retained a lot more and passed the permit test in 8 minutes or so, the lady at the DMV couldn't believe How fast i did it and that I actually passed doing it that quick.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

PlanB's Comment
member avatar

I feel like a jerk for ignoring that email thinking it was automated spam.

Thank you for putting together the training program. I'll be spending a lot of time on it during my bus ride to Springfield Missouri.

I'm scheduled to attend Prime orientation on the 25th for PSD and have been so busy helping my wife get ready to be on her own with our two toddlers while I am away. Haven't had the time to just sit down and study unfortunately.

I do have a NC cdl permit...to bad it doesn't transfer to Missouri.

Again, as a new guy here, I thank you for building this training tool.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

PSD:

Prime Student Driver

Prime Inc has a CDL training program and the first phase is referred to as PSD. You'll get your permit and then 10,000 miles of on the road instruction.

The following is from Prime's website:

Prime’s PSD begins with you obtaining your CDL permit. Then you’ll go on the road with a certified CDL instructor for no less than 75 hours of one-on-one behind the wheel training. After training, you’ll return to Prime’s corporate headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, for final CDL state testing and your CDL license.

Obtain CDL Permit / 4 Days

  • Enter program, study and test for Missouri CDL permit.
  • Start driving/training at Prime Training Center in Springfield, Missouri.
  • Work toward 40,000 training dispatched miles (minimum) with food allowance while without CDL (Food allowance is paid back with future earnings).

On-the-Road Instruction / 10,000 Miles

  • Train with experienced certified CDL instructor for 3-4 weeks in a real world environment.
  • Get 75 hours of behind-the-wheel time with one-on-one student/instructor ratio.
  • Earn 10,000 miles toward total 40,000 miles needed.
Unholychaos's Comment
member avatar

I'm going to play devil's advocate here and say that there are things in the high road program that aren't necessarily asked on the written test I took in Iowa. So I can see the emailers point to an extent. Yes, we do need to know a lot of what the high road covers out here, I'm not knocking that. But we don't necessarily need to know and memorize absolutely EVERYTHING to get the CDL. Again, not knocking the high road program. It's a great tool to learn.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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