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Why do so many people get booted out of trucking? This is why...

Topic 20731 | Page 2

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Joshua H.'s Comment
member avatar

I am actually very thankful for the HR training program. It makes learning very easy by having review questions after every page. After studying through the DMV's booklet and finding this amazing website, I tested myself with some test quizzes and failed miserably.

Fast forward to now, after a few days, I can pass all general knowledge and almost all air brake tests with ease. I am confident that by using these tools that have been created here, and the insight given through the forums, I can pass all my tests with ease when I go on the 25th to Jim Palmer.

Thank you to the men and women who make this sight helpful for both new and old truckers.

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Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

U.H.C., and others who think repetition is a waste of time,
Consider this:

It's the covers that hang over the side of your bed that keep you warm at night.

warm-and-cozy-bed-you.jpg

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
But we don't necessarily need to know and memorize absolutely EVERYTHING to get the CDL.

How did you know what was going to be asked on the test? You couldn't possibly have known. So you have to study everything.

How did you know what information is important in order to drive a truck safely before you had ever driven a truck? You couldn't possibly have known. So you learn everything that's presented to make sure you have the broadest range of knowledge possible.

There are a lot of people who come into this industry and underestimate the challenges they're going to face. They also overestimate their own abilities and knowledge. They make a lot of assumptions, they ignore the advice they're given, and they put in the minimum effort.

The failure rate for student drivers is astronomical, and yet how many student drivers think they're going to fail to make it as truck drivers when they begin? No one. If you thought you were going to fail, you wouldn't have made the attempt.

You simply don't embark on a journey into something with life-or-death consequences making assumptions, ignoring advice, and deciding which information you think is important and which information isn't important. You couldn't possibly know that. You could easily kill yourself or someone else by not knowing the information presented.

But we don't necessarily need to know and memorize absolutely EVERYTHING to get the CDL.

So is that all it takes to drive a truck safely? You just need to get your CDL? Are you saying once you've accomplished that you know everything you need to know and the learning phase is over?

So go ahead and play devil's advocate. Defend people's right to choose not to learn the materials. Do you think that's a well thought out position to take?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

andhe78's Comment
member avatar

I've said it before Brett, but somewhere during the time that I struggled my way through the High Road Training Program's section on the log book rules, a light bulb lit up in my brain. I suddenly saw the path to success as a professional driver.

Lol, that is exactly where I was a couple of weeks ago-trying to figure out the split sleeper rule and in what scenarios it could be used to my advantage. Took a couple of days, but finally got it figured out, thanks to the high road.

My only problem with it, wish I'd realized that logging in kept track of my scores, did everything as a visitor.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
ChickieMonster's Comment
member avatar

This kind of thing right here is exactly why I made a top Ten Tips for rookies.

Number 5 was "Be a Professional Driver". And number 2 was "Don't forget to pack your brain and common sense".

Those two tips alone could revolutionize not just rookies, but a solid third of the industry if they would just practice them!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

As in-perfect the vetting system is in the trucking companies, it's the prolonged duration of the process and the number of different people watching an individual, that typically blocks entry for jerks like Brett pointed out. For the most part anyone with an arrogant and ambivalent attitude is likely NOT going to make it through the first week of school, if for no other reason their entitled belief system places them above the necessity of knowing the basics and studying hard.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Number 5 was "Be a Professional Driver". And number 2 was "Don't forget to pack your brain and common sense".

Those two tips alone could revolutionize not just rookies, but a solid third of the industry if they would just practice them!

You're not kidding! I've never had a career or a hobby like trucking where all you had to do was give it your best effort and be nice to people and you'll stand out above the crowd.

Competing as a business owner you're going against people who are shooting for the stars. They put every moment of their waking time, all of their money, and all of their best ideas into everything they do. They obsess about getting better 7 days a week.

In mountain climbing, snowboarding, and other athletic pursuits you have the same type of people. Super achievers. They pour every ounce of energy they have into training hard, trying out the latest gear, learning new techniques, and often times even putting their life on the line to achieve new goals.

Truck driving? Put on a clean pair of jeans, smile, and say hi to people and you're already ahead of 75% of the drivers out there. The standards of conduct and the level of competition is very, very low in this industry.

For people to complain that there are a few sentences of information they don't think they should have to know really tells you how little effort and thought many people put into trucking.

Trucking is an extraordinary career for extraordinary people, but because of its reputation it simply doesn't attract very many extraordinary people.

their entitled belief system places them above the necessity of knowing the basics and studying hard.

Exactly. If you won't even cover the basics by having a strong work ethic, an open mind, and a willingness to learn you're going to be singled out quickly and handed a bus ticket home.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Greg H.'s Comment
member avatar

I have a great memory. I have a terrible memory. Or maybe it's just better than some, and worst than others. I don't know. Either way, I have difficulty retaining anything I learn. Which means that I have to work twice as hard as most people do to remember things that I study or (read).

I have around 140 IQ, when it comes to figuring things out, but that poor memory of mine can really be a bummer sometimes.

I was laughed at because I stayed up late studying for my cdl the first time I went to trucking school. And quite honestly, it wasn't a laughing matter to me. I had to, to remember anything. And I've since forgotten most of what I learned. I hate it.

Now, here I am trying again. And I have to admit, even though I do take pride in learning everything, my first time around I was fighting just to pass the test, and hopefully come out with a good score.

So, I tend to get a little irked at privileged people or people who don't think it is necessary for them to do certain things.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

ACO476's Comment
member avatar

I first studied my states CMV handbook before starting the high road training program. I noticed that the high road training program was missing information that was in my states CMV handbook. I'm glad I took both seriously and passed all of my CMV tests first try. The girl at my local DMV was quite surprised at how well I did. Make sure you study both and take both very seriously.

For the life of me I can't understand why people don't want to be the very best at what they do, either in their professional lives or even in their personal lives. I'm sure they'll be the ones "just passing through" and won't last long in this profession.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
I noticed that the high road training program was missing information that was in my states CMV handbook

Really? Because the High Road is the CDL manual. It's not our version of it. It's the actual manual.

What information was it missing?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards
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