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Why do so many people get booted out of trucking? This is why...

Topic 20731 | Page 3

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Old School's Comment
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What information was it missing?

Brett, he's got to be referring to the special section in the Texas manual concerning farm equipment, lights, and reflectors.

Mothman's Comment
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It's funny how some people approach this career - like they are just going into a new fast food restaurant for another average job that can be done by any average person. All they think they really need is the license, so they can get started - merely a formality!

Believe it or not, I just got rejected by my first choice simply based on "recent" work history. The recruiter basically implied I needed to go flip burgers for 24 months then reapply if I was still interested. So maybe some companies are pushing this mentality from the inside out.

On the other hand, I'm a 42 year old that knows the career he wants at this point in life and I'm studying and reading everything I can. This site is a great help. Not only in training, testing, etc. but also in all the diaries and information provided.

Brett, thank you for offering this to the industry.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

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What information was it missing?

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Brett, he's got to be referring to the special section in the Texas manual concerning farm equipment, lights, and reflectors.

I was thinking the same thing. That oddball section is the only thing I can think of that it could be. I actually have that section built for the High Road but I have to install it yet.

ACO476's Comment
member avatar

Really? Because the High Road is the CDL manual. It's not our version of it. It's the actual manual.

What information was it missing?

Texas chapter 14: Special requirements for Texas commercial motor vehicles was not in the high road training program. State specific, but might be worth adding as an option.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Commercial Motor Vehicle:

A commercial motor vehicle is any vehicle used in commerce to transport passengers or property with either:

  • A gross vehicle weight rating of 26,001 pounds or more
  • A gross combination weight rating of 26,001 pounds or more which includes a towed unit with a gross vehicle weight rating of more than 10,000 pounds
ACO476's Comment
member avatar

Brett, he's got to be referring to the special section in the Texas manual concerning farm equipment, lights, and reflectors.

Oops, just saw this. You are correct. Brett is also correct that it is an oddball section, but there were quite a few questions on my written test covering this section. Having said that, and more to the point of this thread, I'm glad I went way above and beyond by studying my paper manual, taking the high road training program, and reading advice on this site. People should be compelled to do everything they can to do/be the best that they can!

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

I love the High Roads training. I did not utilize it to the extent I should have, though. Yes, I passed the permit on my first try, for the general knowledge, combination vehicles, and air brakes. I listened to my recruiter, and decided to wait on taking my hazmat and tanker. I now wish I didn't. That is my mistake. I would love to say that I didn't have the time to add the extra endorsements, but really, I was being selfish and wanted as much wife time as possible before I left. I foolishly did not even look at those sections, until we went through those sections in our class. That is when I sorta smacked my head. Better late than never, but I should have just gotten it done.

The way it is set up, is perfect for the way I learn. I am using that method in learning my pre trip, and it has helped me get 90% of the pre trip finished, and will be ready to test out on Monday first thing. The HR is designed in such a way, that makes it really hard to fail, unless you try.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Combination Vehicle:

A vehicle with two separate parts - the power unit (tractor) and the trailer. Tractor-trailers are considered combination vehicles.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
MIchael C.'s Comment
member avatar

I gave up my CDL 3 years ago, big mistake, a least in KY if its been less than 5 years, you only have to retake the written test. so.. I retested last week and after using your help I passed it with flying colors. Thank you for the help.

as for the guy who thinks he doesn't need to study the whole CDL manual. I hope he doesn't get behind the wheel, he is the type of loser that makes it bad for the rest of us. this why the government is forcing ELDs on truck drivers.

If someone stops using our High Road Training Program I'll send them an email to see if everything is ok and ask if they're having any problems with the program. I just got this response:

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Hi Bret,

Sorry I don't really like your HR training program.

I don't like being forced to keep reviewing things that I don't care about or need/want to learn.

I don't need to memorize the entire manual, I just need to pass the tests.

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So this fella is getting ready to drive an 80,000 pound death machine surrounded by innocent children but he doesn't need to learn the materials, he just needs to pass the tests, as if passing a test means you've done enough.

He doesn't like to be "forced to learn". Poor guy. Life is tough.

So I explain to him that he does indeed need to know the materials and that passing the test isn't enough to know how to do this job safely and he says:

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No I don't need to memorize what is required to get a class D drivers license.

Take your **** poor attitude and shove it. F*** you and your site...

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As if that wasn't bad enough, not 10 minutes before this (seriously, is there something in the air today?) a guy sends me a message saying the program keeps making him review the same questions. I told him it's because he kept missing one of the questions. In fact, he missed it four times!

His response:

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I can assure you I didn't miss a question four times

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So I pulled up his scores and here is a screenshot. If you'll look at the chart at the bottom right it shows he was 3 for 7 on one of the questions, meaning he missed it four times. So I assured him that yes indeed he did miss a question four times.

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So you tell me - why do 25% of the people who attend these Company-Sponsored Training Programs wind up on a bus home within three days? Because about 25% of the people who show up act like arrogant, know-it-all jerks.

Of course some of these types do make it through training but they mostly go on to become terminal rats:

Episode 10: Terminal Rats Are Derailing Trucking Careers

Rule #1 in life: Don't be a jerk

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

B Team's Comment
member avatar

Are the last two sections of the HR Training needed if you are not planning on driving flatbed? None of the material in those sections appears in the Alabama CDL manual. Just curious. Starting CDL school at local community college on Monday (9/18). Scored 99% on HR on all sections up to last two. Looking forward to classes starting.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar
Are the last two sections of the HR Training needed if you are not planning on driving flatbed?

Those two sections are just flat bed specific. You don't need them for any kind of state testing. They are designed to help new flat bed drivers be safe with their securement practices.

Personally, I think there should be an endorsement for flat bedding. That way there could be some sort of standardized testing so that flat bedders have to prove some level of competency before they are turned loose on the interstates with 40,000 pound steel coils on their truck.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Michael C.'s Comment
member avatar

I used this program to pass my test 17 months ago. I would read the that section of the Manual and then take the test. If I missed a question I would reread that part and test again. It is a great setup.

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