TruckingTruth logo

Long over due up date

Topic 20758 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
King Pin's Comment
member avatar

Been with May Trucking for 9 month's, is my first company in this industry. May has treated me very well and taught me many new skills. I recommend May to any new driver beginning there career.

Little on how May's operation works. Planner's assign dispatches to driver's, not there DM's. Your given routings and directions to shippers and receivers, most follow them. Driver's aren't allowed to reschedule appointments. Fuel stops are assigned to you by your DM.

May truck's are very well maintained and less than 3 yrs old. Trailers are maintained well too. All truck's are automatic with inverter's, no APU's. There's only two divisions, 11 western, OTR "48 state's". Truck's are governed 61 mph cruise control and 59 mph pedal.

Been busy proving myself to my company that I'm a top tier driver. Never been late on an appointment, don't complain about nothing. I'm accident free, no S.O.H. violations. It's been a long hard road however, I've climbed the ladder and I'm known as a "top tier driver".

I realy like my company but, getting discouraged about my miles and pay. First 5 month's was great than slowly been going down hill from there. Checks are $215-$360 a wk. Talked to my DM about it, haven't seen any difference. Average 900- 2000 wkly @ .36 a mile.

Been thinking about looking elsewhere for higher pay scale. Hesitate because my goal is to stay at least 1 yr. Any advice is much appreciated.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

APU's:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

millionmiler24's Comment
member avatar

Been with May Trucking for 9 month's, is my first company in this industry. May has treated me very well and taught me many new skills. I recommend May to any new driver beginning there career.

Little on how May's operation works. Planner's assign dispatches to driver's, not there DM's. Your given routings and directions to shippers and receivers, most follow them. Driver's aren't allowed to reschedule appointments. Fuel stops are assigned to you by your DM.

May truck's are very well maintained and less than 3 yrs old. Trailers are maintained well too. All truck's are automatic with inverter's, no APU's. There's only two divisions, 11 western, OTR "48 state's". Truck's are governed 61 mph cruise control and 59 mph pedal.

Been busy proving myself to my company that I'm a top tier driver. Never been late on an appointment, don't complain about nothing. I'm accident free, no S.O.H. violations. It's been a long hard road however, I've climbed the ladder and I'm known as a "top tier driver".

I realy like my company but, getting discouraged about my miles and pay. First 5 month's was great than slowly been going down hill from there. Checks are $215-$360 a wk. Talked to my DM about it, haven't seen any difference. Average 900- 2000 wkly @ .36 a mile.

Been thinking about looking elsewhere for higher pay scale. Hesitate because my goal is to stay at least 1 yr. Any advice is much appreciated.

Stick with them that first full year. Talk to your planner and your DM as professionally as you can. Remind them of your track record and maybe that alone will persuade them to get you more miles.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

APU's:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Big Scott's Comment
member avatar

You have done a great job so far. You have spent time developing a good rapore and reputation with you company. If you go somewhere else, you have to start at the bottom as an unproven driver. When you speak to your DM , ask them for advice for what you can do to get more miles. Are you taking a 34 each week or running on recaps? How often are you going home? One trick to get more miles is to keep your doors closed and truck moving. As we get better at backing we get in and out of docks quicker. You're still new. You have 3 more months to make that year. When does May increase pay? Exhaust all options with May before you jump ship. Don't burn bridges. Hope that helps. Good luck.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Driver's aren't allowed to reschedule appointments.

Every company will tell you this. They all tell their drivers this. All Top Tier drivers do it anyhow.

There are normally several areas where drivers can improve their miles in a big way:

1) Logbook utilization

2) Moving appointments forward

3) Getting pre-planned on loads

With paychecks as low as yours are I'm assuming you must never run out of hours, correct? If you're running out of hours with anything less than 2,800 miles in a week then you're not managing your time the right way.

As far as moving appointments forward, do it. Call customers and see if you can come in early. Most of them will say they can't guarantee anything. Show up early anyways.

Finally, try to push for pre-plans after your deliveries. If they're waiting until you're empty to assign your next load then you're missing out on a lot of the best freight. You have to push those load planners hard to keep you rolling, and be specific with your goals. Let them know you're looking for 3,000 miles per week and not a mile less. That doesn't mean it will happen every time, but you should be able to average close to that over the long run.

You really have to learn to push the envelope to get those big miles. You have to squeeze every minute you can out of that logbook. You have to push your appointments times earlier. You have to lobby those load planners hard for more pre-plans and better miles.

You know the expression, "The squeaky wheel gets the grease" - well you have to be that squeaky wheel. Don't be afraid to be a pest sometimes. Keep buzzing around their ears like a gnat telling them, "more miles, pre-plans, more miles, pre-plans" - just keep after them. If you were showing up late on deliveries they would be pestering you for not doing your job up to standards. If you're a top tier driver and you're not getting 3,000 miles per week then your load planners and dispatcher aren't doing their job up to standards and it's up to you to let them know that.

The miles are there. They're available. You're just not getting your share. You have to be more convincing.

Here's another thing. The load planners assign freight but your dispatcher is responsible for making sure you're being taken care of. If you're not getting the miles you deserve it's up to your dispatcher to get with the load planners to get you better freight. If your dispatcher is telling you there's nothing he/she can do then you let them know you're going to make some phone calls to those with the authority to do something about it - and do it. Make those calls. Get your dispatcher's boss on the phone. Get the operations manager on the phone, or the terminal manager. Keep making phone calls and keep asking:

"Why am I not getting the miles I deserve? I've proven I can handle 3,000 miles per week and I know they're available so why am I not getting them? What do I have to do to get 3,000 miles per week? I know other drivers at our company are getting that many. I know drivers at other companies are getting that many. What is being done to make sure I get that many from now on?"

But remember, this all hinges on you doing your job at a Top Tier Level. You have to have the hours available on your clock and you have to make all of your appointments on time without exception.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Old School's Comment
member avatar

I'm just gonna chime in here and say that every point Brett makes here is solid and true. There have been several times I've posted about the things I do out here to keep myself turning big miles, and another driver from my company will jump into the conversation saying something like, "over on the reefer side we aren't allowed to do those kind of things."

There is a lot more flexibilty in this business than most newbies realize. I understand a person who is in their first three months or so not taking every initiative they can to push for more miles, but nobody can claim to be a top tier driver and be settling for three and four hundred dollar paychecks regularly.

Being safe and on time for all your appointments is nothing short of super easy if your only doing 1,500 - 1,800 miles a week. Being safe and on time are pieces of the puzzle, but initiative and creativity have got to find their way into your approach also.

Your dispatcher is depending on you to be getting more miles, not you depending on him. When you get that part of the game figured out, then you will be on the path to being at the top of the food chain.

Dispatchers love the drivers who are always available at the prime times, and understand how to make sure they've got hours enough to "git er done."

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
King Pin's Comment
member avatar

Company policy is drivers are forbidden to reschedule loads. Asked in the past for my DM to reschedule my appoints because I'm mostly ahead of schedule, if been told that policy is no rescheduling. Most loads have more time than needed to get to destination. Example 640 mile load dispatch, do in three days. Can't drop off or reschule. There is lots of sitting and wasted time.

Had my 6 month review and was told my log book, time management, safety record is superb. I received a $.01 raise. I asked if there's anything I can approve on and was told no and my track record is very impressive. Also, ask my DM time to time what can I approve on? He always says," your doing very well keep up the good work".

I take the advice you and Old School gives to new driver's on being more efficient and more productive, however, there policies seem to be differently than TT members describe how there company is. I get along with my DM. I'm still trying to figure out how to get miles without being a complainer or roughing any feathers. Oh ya, forgot to mention I do at least 9 resets a month do to waiting for dispatches. Maybe transferring to different terminal or DM might be my only hope. Under $2000 a month gross, just isn't worth it to me. I have taken 7 days off in almost 9 months. I know my performance and attendance is great. In turmoil on what to do.

double-quotes-start.png

Driver's aren't allowed to reschedule appointments.

The miles are there. They're available. You're just not getting your share. You have to be more convincing.

Here's another thing. The load planners assign freight but your dispatcher is responsible for making sure you're being taken care of. If you're not getting the miles you deserve it's up to your dispatcher to get with the load planners to get you better freight. If your dispatcher is telling you there's nothing he/she can do then you let them know you're going to make some phone calls to those with the authority to do something about it - and do it. Make those calls. Get your dispatcher's boss on the phone. Get the operations manager on the phone, or the terminal manager. Keep making phone calls and keep asking:

double-quotes-start.png

"Why am I not getting the miles I deserve? I've proven I can handle 3,000 miles per week and I know they're available so why am I not getting them? What do I have to do to get 3,000 miles per week? I know other drivers at our company are getting that many. I know drivers at other companies are getting that many. What is being done to make sure I get that many from now on?"

double-quotes-end.png

But remember, this all hinges on you doing your job at a Top Tier Level. You have to have the hours available on your clock and you have to make all of your appointments on time without exception.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Well, like I said, every company says their policy is for drivers to leave the scheduling alone. And rarely will a driver reschedule a load through their dispatcher. They'll do it themselves by calling the customers and showing up early.

The fact that you're doing 9 resets a month is pretty ludicrous. Considering you're grossing $500/week you shouldn't be doing any resets at all.

Have you spoken to other drivers at your company to find out the kind of miles they're getting and how they're handling all this? You company wouldn't have any experienced drivers at all, nor would they even be in business at this point if their drivers averaged $500/week considering the industry average is $900/week, right?

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Calkansan's Comment
member avatar

I will chime in. I drove for May for 2 1/2 years. I was dispatched out of Brooks doing 48. Bretts suggestions are spot on but here are some company specific things I would do. 1) I would send eta to con on the Qualcomm in free-form message. This lets your DM start working on next load. Also mention it during live load call. I would joke and ask if I could deliver early, drop in yard, or switch with another driver limited on hours. Say, "I hope you are not going to have your best driver sitting on this load. I'm out here to make you money. Your paycheck won't be as big if I am sitting " lol. 2) another thing I did. If in a yard without a preplan, I would go look at bol's on dropped trailers. Write down 3 or 4 trailer #'s and send Qualcomm to find out if they are dispatched. I did that in Denver. Surprise, planners didn't have 1 dispatched to Carthage, so I got it. It lead to a 4 pu load around little rock going to boise. Planners thanked me with extra $25 because that trailer got lost in system and I delivered on time. These are just 2 things I did. Communication is the key. Let DM know when available and how many hours you have. Are you west 11 or 48? I ran 48. Fewer drivers in 48 so less competition for loads. Longest I have sat was maybe 24 in Payette waiting for Coors load to arrive so I could repower to get home. PS. Golden state loads you will sit on. Contract to valuable and planners don't want to drop ball with them. I hope this helps. Good luck.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

King Pin, do you remember what I stated earlier in this thread? Here's what I'm referencing...

Being safe and on time are piees of the puzzle, but initiative and creativity have got to find their way into your approach also.

Did you notice in Calkansan's response how he took the initiative and got creative with his own ideas. He went and looked at the bills on trailers at a drop yard and then started a dialogue on the Qualcomm so that he could keep himself moving. This is just the kind of stuff extraordinary drivers do every day that they are out here. I don't sit and wait for my dispatcher to come up with a way to get me moving. I am usually two or three days ahead of him in my thinking and I keep him appraised of where I will be and when I need my next load. Any time I have a load that has two days extra time on it I am on the phone directly with that customer. I can't tell you how many times I have had notes on the Qualcomm that say, "do not call this customer," and I call them anyway and get myself unloaded. Most of the time the customer appreciates that I took the initiative and helped them get there product quicker than it was scheduled.

I would never recommend that a brand new driver try this, but someone in your position who is getting a ridiculously low amount of work done because your waiting around on scheduled delivery times; I would say you have got to give it a try. I mean, what have you got to lose? You aren't happy with the way things are now. I say shake things up a bit. I can almost promise you that your dispatcher is going to appreciate your extra effort, and the results, regardless of whatever company policies to the contrary you have seen.

Let me tell you something about dispatchers. They are usually overworked. They have a lot of drivers on their board, and if they see that you are under a load and not late on the appointment, then they may not be too worried about you. In other words, you are the last thing on their mind. They have plenty of other pressing concerns. I make every attempt to be on the top of my dispatchers mind - in a good way, that is. I want him always looking out for me, and one effective way to do that is to establish yourself as always getting things done ahead of time.

Let me try to make this clear... These dispatchers have got managers over them - there are layers of management at these trucking companies, and everybody's job is getting measured - everybody's job is performance based, not just the driver. If you are not showing up as late on your deliveries then nobody is really catching on to the fact that you are sitting too much. Just try this: get one of those loads that you think you are not supposed to change the appointments on delivered early, and then be sitting on his computer screen as empty, waiting for a load. Now you are being noticed on everybody's radar, including the managers who are trying to make sure your dispatcher is doing his job. Nobody wants an empty truck just sitting around waiting on a load when there are loads available that need to be delivered. If you can get an appointment moved forward, then just send your dispatcher a message stating the time that you will be empty. Send him an ETA (Estimated Time of Arrival call) and a PTA (Projected Time of Availability) Then take care of your business - you don't even need to tell him what you did, just do it. See how it all pans out. You are going to discover that this is the way the pros do it, and they never have to worry about getting fired for being the most productive members on the team.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

King Pin's Comment
member avatar

Thanks O.S. I'll give it a whirl next time I'm early and see how things turn out. Keep everyone up to date on progress.

King Pin, do you remember what I stated earlier in this thread? Here's what I'm referencing...

double-quotes-start.png

Being safe and on time are piees of the puzzle, but initiative and creativity have got to find their way into your approach also.

double-quotes-end.png

Did you notice in Calkansan's response how he took the initiative and got creative with his own ideas. He went and looked at the bills on trailers at a drop yard and then started a dialogue on the Qualcomm so that he could keep himself moving. This is just the kind of stuff extraordinary drivers do every day that they are out here. I don't sit and wait for my dispatcher to come up with a way to get me moving. I am usually two or three days ahead of him in my thinking and I keep him appraised of where I will be and when I need my next load. Any time I have a load that has two days extra time on it I am on the phone directly with that customer. I can't tell you how many times I have had notes on the Qualcomm that say, "do not call this customer," and I call them anyway and get myself unloaded. Most of the time the customer appreciates that I took the initiative and helped them get there product quicker than it was scheduled.

I would never recommend that a brand new driver try this, but someone in your position who is getting a ridiculously low amount of work done because your waiting around on scheduled delivery times; I would say you have got to give it a try. I mean, what have you got to lose? You aren't happy with the way things are now. I say shake things up a bit. I can almost promise you that your dispatcher is going to appreciate your extra effort, and the results, regardless of whatever company policies to the contrary you have seen.

Let me tell you something about dispatchers. They are usually overworked. They have a lot of drivers on their board, and if they see that you are under a load and not late on the appointment, then they may not be too worried about you. In other words, you are the last thing on their mind. They have plenty of other pressing concerns. I make every attempt to be on the top of my dispatchers mind - in a good way, that is. I want him always looking out for me, and one effective way to do that is to establish yourself as always getting things done ahead of time.

Let me try to make this clear... These dispatchers have got managers over them - there are layers of management at these trucking companies, and everybody's job is getting measured - everybody's job is performance based, not just the driver. If you are not showing up as late on your deliveries then nobody is really catching on to the fact that you are sitting too much. Just try this: get one of those loads that you think you are not supposed to change the appointments on delivered early, and then be sitting on his computer screen as empty, waiting for a load. Now you are being noticed on everybody's radar, including the managers who are trying to make sure your dispatcher is doing his job. Nobody wants an empty truck just sitting around waiting on a load when there are loads available that need to be delivered. If you can get an appointment moved forward, then just send your dispatcher a message stating the time that you will be empty. Send him an ETA (Estimated Time of Arrival call) and a PTA (Projected Time of Availability) Then take care of your business - you don't even need to tell him what you did, just do it. See how it all pans out. You are going to discover that this is the way the pros do it, and they never have to worry about getting fired for being the most productive members on the team.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel

Need help? We have instructions for sharing photos from photo sharing sites



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com/images/header.jpg
Submit
Cancel

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More