Road Training For The Vegetarian?

Topic 20771 | Page 1

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Kidzstang's Comment
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Interestingly, my past career requirements of long times away from home, long working hours and long hours in the car led me to become a vegetarian. It was very convenient to pull off of the road, open the cooler, make a veggie wrap, eat an apple, go the the bathroom and get moving on down the road. I've now a good fifteen years into the vegetarian lifestyle and couldn't even think of eating meat.

My question is relative to the driver training phase where you travel with a trainer. I'm sure that at some truck stops, I'll be able to catch a salad or two, but wouldn't want to count on that.

But, what's the chance that I'll be able to take along my own food during this phase of training?

What do you guys and gals think?

ChickieMonster's Comment
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It's possible, but don't count on it. Take the opportunity to have a conversation with your potential trainer and ask (politely) if they would let you use a small section of their fridge or cooler for some food.

But be prepared to adjust to not having any cooler space. And also to paying much higher prices for those types of foods at truck stops.

Take a little time to research some alternatives that don't require refrigeration and also things you can order at different fast food places that work with your food choices.

If you aren't a strict vegan, things will be a bit easier. If you are, well, things are going to be tough. The best advice I can give is do some homework.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Truck drivers are carnivores! smile.gif

You should have no problem when you are in your own truck, but that training period will be a challenge. You are going to be sharing space with someone for four weeks. One consideration would be to hire on with someone like Schneider who has a much shorter training period. You might be able to make it work that way.

Kat's Comment
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I became vegetarian WHILE I was training due to the up close and personal with the meat industry. It wasn't a difficult change. Do you eat fish? If so, that makes it a little easier out here.

Big Scott's Comment
member avatar

Most truck stops sell some kind of salad or fruit. Many Pilots have Subways. PB&J could also work. If your trainer can't share or doesn't a cooler, you may be able to get a small one.

With CFI you are out with a trainer for about 3 weeks.

Hope that helps.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Where you stop for grub of mostly up to your trainer. My trainer often stopped at Walmart to stock up, so veggies might not be a problem.

(My trainer did not have a cooler, so that made issues of its own.)

Kidzstang's Comment
member avatar

It's possible, but don't count on it. Take the opportunity to have a conversation with your potential trainer and ask (politely) if they would let you use a small section of their fridge or cooler for some food.

But be prepared to adjust to not having any cooler space. And also to paying much higher prices for those types of foods at truck stops.

Take a little time to research some alternatives that don't require refrigeration and also things you can order at different fast food places that work with your food choices.

If you aren't a strict vegan, things will be a bit easier. If you are, well, things are going to be tough. The best advice I can give is do some homework.

Thanks all! I think from your comments it won't be so bad. I, unlike carnivores can go without refrigerating my food for weeks on end; which is why I became a veggie to begin with. A couple zucchinis, some good peanut butter, an apple or two and a bag of nuts and I'm off to the races for a few days. The biggest problem is probably getting to a real food store every six or seven days as opposed to what I could find at a truck stop.

So, as I understand the answers, taking along my own food shouldn't be a problem just so I don't need to have refrigeration. I was worried that if I showed up with a couple bags of groceries (about the size of two gallon jugs of milk), that it may take up too much space.

I'll definitely talk this over with my trainer, if he doesn't allow me a bit of space for my food in the truck, I'll just tough it out.

I don't eat fish, or meat of any kind, but I'm not a vegan. I agree that they would have a bigger problem, but luckily that isn't me.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Michael F.'s Comment
member avatar

First, of all, if it's not such a big deal, start eating meat. Otherwise, I'd suggest you purchase a cooler. I know it's not of much help but this is what I can think of.

Kidzstang's Comment
member avatar

Cool Beans! Now all that I have to do is tie up some loose ends by the end of the year and get my daughter married off in ceremonies in India and St. Pete. Shortly there after, I'm good to roll.

I'll go on lurking around here for the next 5 months or so and then check in before I start a class. I think I'm going to go for an independent class, just to keep my options open while I learn the ins and outs of this trade.

Thanks all!

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Half Pint's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I don't eat fish, or meat of any kind, but I'm not a vegan. I agree that they would have a bigger problem, but luckily that isn't me.

That's great!

I'd really like to see your meal plans. I'm WFPBNO (whole food, plant based, no oil) and I eat fairly simple. You sound like you have a better handle on how to eat on the road than I do.

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