Would Trucking Be A Good Fit For Me?

Topic 20781 | Page 1

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Robert J.'s Comment
member avatar

Okay, so I'm sure this is different from the average "getting into trucking" story, but I've had a solid career in the financial/accounting field for the past decade, make about 70k, and to put it simply and very honestly, I just hate it and quite frankly, I've always hated it and have only continued for the money.

I sit in a tiny gray cubicle, surrounded by people who get off on trashing other people in the office. We also have a couple who try to make others look bad at meetings. It's a sick game to them, and I've encountered that kind of backstabbing garbage at all of my office jobs. I've only had three, so maybe I'm unlucky, but teamwork and camaraderie have been non-existent in the offices where I've worked.

There are also the sycophants that I cannot stand. This one guy will trash the boss, and then as soon as the boss enters the room he's in his office acting like he's his best friend. There are a handful of these types who will hang out in the boss's office, wasting company time instead of doing their jobs, and the boss likes it.

In fact, I've been reprimanded in the past for not talking to people. I'm the type who goes in, keeps his head down, completely focuses on the job, and then goes home at the end of the day. I don't do the golf thing, the happy hour thing, the lunch with coworkers thing, or the water cooler gossip thing. I just don't deal with office culture BS very well.

That said, I've always had a passion fpr traveling and taking LONG road trips. I live in Houston and have driven non-stop from home to Amarillo, Hot Springs, Oklahoma City, Big Bend National Park, and Carlsbad Caverns (all separate trips, only stopping for gas and to eat). When I reach my destination, I'm actually pumped up and not really tired. Driving 9 or 10 hours non-stop is fun.

There's something else that makes me think I would like trucking. I'm a major loner. Seriously, I'm a very nice and polite guy, but I really don't enjoy socializing. It just isn't something I get satisfaction from. My retirement dream is to move to a small cabin in the woods, 20 miles from the nearest small town, with a couple of cats and a dog for company, and spend my time hiking, fishing, and chopping firewood. Anyway, I don't have a family and don't plan on having one, so it would just be me.

As far as finances go, I can ditch the apartment and live out of the truck. If I can get to $50k/year, that would be great since I wouldn't be paying for housing. It seems like saving $1,500 to $2,000 per month would be doable as you are only spending money on food, laundry, and maybe a little extra for entertainment (correct me if I'm wrong). I live very cheaply as it is and have some retirement investments, but I'd like to continue building out the 401k over time.

Anyway, I'm seriously considering making a go for it. Tips, ideas?

Big Scott's Comment
member avatar

Only you can answer your question. Here is our starter pack of info. Read through that to get some great info into this lifestyle.

The best advice I can give you is take your time and scour this site. Good luck.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Robert, only knowing about you what you've written here, to just might like OTR truck driving. Be sure to read the first two articles Scott has posted. The third, the High Road Training Program, so get you ready to add the CDL written test, which gets you the CDL permit.

OTR trucking is a lonely business. No syncophants or apparatchiks to mess up your day. Do keep in mind, though, that it is a business that operates 24/7. You won't be working 24 hours a day, but you might be responsible to drive "all night" for a 5am pick up. And you still be working in a tiny grey cubicle. Only this time you'll have a great picture window, with scenery that changes by the minute.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Ben W.'s Comment
member avatar

Yes, I think you can be good for trucking.

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