Shifting Gears In A Dump Truck

Topic 20782 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Allen9876 A.'s Comment
member avatar

Let's say you're going 50 mph in a Dump Truck, and you slow down because of a red traffic light , now going 30 mph. You need to downshift. How do you know which gear you're supposed to be in at that speed?

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Well, you could just try paying attention to what gear you were in at 30 mph while you were upshifting.

I'm not sure why you specified a dump truck, because it really makes no difference what type of truck you're in. What will dictate your gear selection will be things like what transmission you're using, rear end gear ratio, and possibly the grade of the road.

This is the kind of thing that just comes natural to you after you've been driving a little while. But trust me, I doubt you are going to be able to get it to go into the wrong gear without making a great effort at it.

Bob H.'s Comment
member avatar
. What will dictate your gear selection will be things like what transmission you're using, rear end gear ratio, and possibly the grade of the road.

OP-Loaded or empty will impact this too.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Let's say you're going 50 mph in a Dump Truck, and you slow down because of a red traffic light , now going 30 mph. You need to downshift. How do you know which gear you're supposed to be in at that speed?

Welcome to Trucking Truth, Allen. Being your first post, and the nature of the question, I figure you're new to the trucking business. No problem, you are who we're here for.

As you gain experience driving a truck, dump or what, you'll know by the seat of your pants. As the previous answers say, your speed, load weight, and gears add into an "official" answer. But just like getting under and catching a fly ball, you'll just be able to do it.

Everybody knows that in your learning, you'll grind several custom gears, like 4 1/2, of your own.

Craig T.'s Comment
member avatar

Pay close attention to what gear is for which speed range. For example, say in my truck 6th gear is ideal for 15-25 mph, 7th is 25-35mph, 8th is 35-45 mph ... all you have to do is know what speed you're at and with experience comes smoothly feeling out what RPM she likes to take it in (the truck).

If you're also driving a 13 speed, and those speed ranges seem to roughly work for you as well, memorize this

6th gear for 15mph translates to 1+ 5= 6 (when you look at the odometer and it says 15, just add the numbers together.) 25 mph translates to 2+5 = 7 (7th gear) 35 mph... 3+5 = 8 45 mph ... 4+5 = 9

Mentally run this through you head some when you're not driving. It'll start to come naturally once you know it and relax a bit.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Allen9876 A.'s Comment
member avatar

I cant see pedestrians on my right, when stationary, and I can't see pedestrians if they're right in front of the truck either. So what do I do with these blind spots?

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

I cant see pedestrians on my right, when stationary, and I can't see pedestrians if they're right in front of the truck either. So what do I do with these blind spots?

The people didn't just appear in your blind spot. You say you are not moving, and you end up with people where you can't see them. Assuming you're really driving and say, waiting for a green light, you should be watching cars and pedestrians around you.

You can keep a mental map tracking where these moving objects are in your blind areas. It's not hard to do if you're paying attention to your surroundings.

Allen9876 A.'s Comment
member avatar

There are a few short off-ramps in my city, dangerously short; the shoulder is too narrow for the truck to go through and bad planning from NC DOT. I can't imagine trying to merge with highway traffic in a tractor trailer on one of these off-ramps. There is probably a list of off-ramps that all truckers avoid. Any advice as to how you should proceed if you encounter these types of situation?

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

There are a few short off-ramps in my city, dangerously short; the shoulder is too narrow for the truck to go through and bad planning from NC DOT. I can't imagine trying to merge with highway traffic in a tractor trailer on one of these off-ramps. There is probably a list of off-ramps that all truckers avoid. Any advice as to how you should proceed if you encounter these types of situation?

Pure and simple; patience. Wait for a "safe" opening when merging, especially with a short runway. If exiting a short ramp you must begin preparing for it before reaching it by signaling your intention and slowing down.

Off/on-ramps as you described cannot be avoided and must be approached with an elevated level of awareness and caution.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel

Need help? We have instructions for sharing photos from photo sharing sites



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com/images/header.jpg
Submit
Cancel

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More