Local Driving Vs. Otr

Topic 20833 | Page 1

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David C.'s Comment
member avatar

I am a tanker-yanker and have been at it for about three years, hauling fuel. My yard is about 50 miles from my home and is about the closest trucking company around. I get up to go to work about 3:00 am, drive about an hour in my pov and put in about a 12 to 14 hour day in the truck on average, then drive 50 miles back home, 5 to 6 days a week. There are plenty of OTR companies around within about a 70 mile radius. I don't know if I would qualify to work for an OTR company but I have seen some of them advertise for transition positions. I don't mind working but, I am older and would like to ease up a little, still need to work full time, mainly for the health insurance, not 65 yet. I am thinking of trying to get on with a company that makes regional runs, home very weekend. Would work like this be a little easier on an older driver

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar
Would work like this be a little easier on an older driver

The answer to your question is not yes, but h*ll yes. LOL.

I'm younger in my 20s, but I actually just went from a local situation very similar to yours to a regional , home every week gig. I was driving 50 miles each way to work and working 10-12 hour shifts either driving locally or yard hostling (depended on the day of the week). Now I still drive an hour to work, but I only do it once a week since I'm in the truck most nights. I'm making better money than I was and I enjoy my life more since I'm not working or driving to work every waking hour.

It shouldn't be difficult for you to find an OTR or regional carrier that will allow you to be home every week. Of course location is everything, so your options will be different than mine were. If you apply to any of the big OTR companies, be sure to ask about regional dedicated accounts they might have that would get you good miles and still have you home every week. With your experience, you might be able to get a good-paying regional gig hauling fuel. Never know til you start applying places.

Good luck!

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

David, there is an additional feature you may like.

Whether you go "pure" OTR or regional , your home time will probably be scheduled and dispatched on a way that you will be able to take your truck home. Actually, you get near your house, and park the truck in a safe area - your company can tell you their policy.

This will save you that 50 mile commute for sure!

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Yeah, there's no reason to go with a company that has a terminal near you. As Errol pointed out, they'll let you take the truck home so it makes no difference where the company is located. That greatly increases your opportunities.

I think running regional where you get home weekends is an awesome gig. You get to see new scenery all the time, enjoy the travelling lifestyle, and make great money yet you're home every weekend. Keep in mind that being home for the weekend usually means anywhere from 36 - 48 hours on average. Once in a while it might be a big longer than that, but not often.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

David C.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the input everyone, this site is great!

Michael S.'s Comment
member avatar

At the very least you'll end up being paid for a greater proportion of those 500 miles you were driving for your commute.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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