My Head Will Explode!***

Topic 20861 | Page 3

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Greg H.'s Comment
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Greg...

I read your recent post and although I understand your loyalty to your current employer, isn't your personal happiness and job satisfaction ultimately more important than helping her to cover an open route? She is a business person...employees come and go. I am sure she'll figure out a solution, likely has several in mind regardless of what you decide to do. In the end is it your problem to fix this for her?

I know, I might not understand, etc., but for me if your are not 100% committed to "getting-on" with trucking, there will always be a "reason" blocking forward progress. I also sense a bit of a comfort-zone issue...are you sure you want this? I mean, once I knew trucking was what I wanted to do as my second career (and perhaps the remainder of my professional life), nothing and no one stood in my way. My ball...and I took it and ran. Try to think about what you really want here, cause to me seems like you are perched on the fence toying with the idea, but maybe not yet serious about it. Not that you asked, but my two cents.

So...your point about getting the permit now, in hope the future need? It's potentially a waste of time and money considering the medical exam must precede the permit. The CLP (permit) has an expiration date, a shelf-life and a limited amount of extension time available. I'd wait, until you have committed to a company and know your start date.

Good luck.

ah, come on G-Town, give me the benefit of the doubt here.... :) I'm not new to this or didn't just fall off of the turnip truck.

That would sound completely reasonable, if she were only going to be down 1 route, or maybe even 2. But, if I go, then she's down 3. There is little or no way to cover 3 routes.

Besides this, I've known her for awhile, and her husband. They're more on the "friend side" than the boss side. And I really don't want to leave her in a bind. Even though, I can think of one past employer I would. lol

No, I'm not comfortable in what I'm doing. I've never really been comfortable in what I'm doing. You really have to understand local delivery. Well, even trucking can be a headache for some, sometimes. Routes come and go.... you're never really promised a fruitful career in local delivery. Unless of course you've been with the company for awhile and they tend to get you work so that you will not leave. And I have been fortunate in the past to where this would be the case. I've always pretty much had a great relationship with my past employers, and they would find me something. But, to get completely comfortable in the courier business is a lie in itself, at least locally. It's like with the electronic age. The courier business lost a lot of business because of everything going digital. We lost a lot of bank work because of it. Less checks being processed. But, contracts are renewed and routes still come and go.... Not to mention the headache, if you are an independent contractor, of keeping your car up kept and well maintained. The pay for local couriers isn't that great. I ran across and statistic once that listed the worst paying jobs. Couriers were at the top of the list. Mechanics, believe it or not, were also at the top of that list. I was sort of surprised to see mechanics there.... but, seeing how I have a friend that has been a mechanic for 20 years, well, actually a few mechanics, I'd tend to believe it. And my mom worked in the parts department for a reputable car dealer for 30 years. She has filled me in on some of the stories from her work place.

Anyway, these are some of the reasons I reconsidered trucking. I mean besides the thread on this forum that is discussing trucks becoming computerized, driving themselves, and no longer needing drivers behind their wheels, in relatively 10 years time, the trucking business is a good one to get into. People always need something shipped somewhere. People will pretty much never stop buying stuff which keeps the trucking industry booming.

And of course I'm not 100% sure of getting back into trucking. You'd have to be one special person to be 100% sure of anything. Especially of a major career change such as trucking. You have to remember, I've been here, I know what to expect or what's expected of me. I know what I have to look forward to.

And I had a difficult time the first time I got my permit. I'm not the fastest learner in the world. And quite honestly I really would like to learn all I can this time around, instead of just rushing through and trying to pass a test. I'd feel more comfortable going ahead and getting it. That way I don't feel the pressure of having to pass while at school. I know you need your medical card first, I've already checked into this. It's good for 6 months, before you must take your road test.

Anyway, hope this helps, God Bless

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Greg wrote:

ah, come on G-Town, give me the benefit of the doubt here.... :) I'm not new to this or didn't just fall off of the turnip truck

I know that Greg, which is exactly why your recent post surprised me a bit. I did preface my response with I know I may not completely understand (meaning the situation), and clearly,... I did not. Sorry, I should have asked before commencing to soapbox preaching.

But this here I understand and respect:

Besides this, I've known her for awhile, and her husband. They're more on the "friend side" than the boss side. And I really don't want to leave her in a bind. Even though, I can think of one past employer I would. lol

"Integrity", is all we really have, isn't it...total control over it. No, I wouldn't leave a friend in a bind like that either. I get it, but I also get that you seem to want to breakaway from this job at some point and know you might be happier as a truck driver than a courier. My situation getting into trucking was somewhat similar to yours...I was in a job that although I wasn't really happy doing it, I was really good it and had a set of golden handcuffs wrapped around my wrists. It took being "outsourced" for the third time for me to finally break free... I was comfortable in that rut for a long time, but certainly not happy. Not to get all Philosophical and such, but it always seems to eventually come back to happiness, or the lack thereof.

And of course I'm not 100% sure of getting back into trucking. You'd have to be one special person to be 100% sure of anything. Especially of a major career change such as trucking. You have to remember, I've been here, I know what to expect or what's expected of me. I know what I have to look forward to.

I think you might have misunderstood me a bit...to me you can commit to something 100% without being totally sure of the outcome. I agree there is always a risk, you can never be totally sure of anything. Even once I committed to going to trucking school, I was somewhat confident that I could learn the craft, but knew deep-down there was always the risk of failure looming overhead. But make no mistake, I was 100% committed to it, without any distractions or doubt that it was exactly what I wanted to do. The motivation was enhanced because I knew I did not want to return to the technology industry. I approached the school and training laser focused and applied my efforts accordingly.

When your ready...you'll know. Good luck and thanks for the interesting reply.

Greg H.'s Comment
member avatar

I didn't really find it to be preachy. Well, maybe just a little. But, I understood where you were coming from.

Anyway, I'm glad you understand my circumstances better now. I hadn't really spelled out all my reasons for not jumping in head over heals into trucking, ' yet '.

I've really just been taking it one step at a time, working through one thing at time. And praying about it all as I go. I don't need the Lord to come down in person and say, ' lo and behold, Gregory Michael, I need you to do this ', but I think sometimes it would save a little time. Lol

I've always been good at things I've set my hands, heart and mind to. I've always been quick to advance in all positions. But, yeah, what you said, ' you were good at it, but your heart wasn't really into it '. Even though I do have a lot of appreciation for everything that I've ever done. I look back now and think, ' nope, wouldn't really want to do that again. '. Trucking on the other hand, I really loved and enjoyed doing, and I believe would actually desire to get back into. I'm sort of surprised I didn't keep with it. Ah well, I had a lot going on back then, and I was young, full of ideas. Even though some of the ideas are still there, they have changed some. Direction for my life has changed some, but relatively the same goals are still in place.

Besides all of this, I haven't really mentioned my BP. The last few times I've checked it, it's been around 143/83. I blame this a lot on these past few years being so stressful. I blame it more on the fact that I haven't been getting the cardiovascular exercise that I need. I was doing quite a bit of exercising back a few years ago. I still do exercise, but not near as much, and with limited cardio work out. I'm sort of upset with this.... my BP was 116/70 just a few years ago. I'm sure I can get it back down quite a bit. I've been exercising more lately to get it down. And also I've been trying to eat better. Not that I really have ever had a bad eating habit, but I've been trying to keep a better watch on what I eat.

I had something else to say and forgot what it was. I think it was to further my input on trucking, and being sure it's what I desire to do. It's really just been a thought on my mind that hasn't really ever gone away. One thing that steers me away is that I know the in's and out's of trucking. I didn't when I first got into it. I honestly believe I would do a lot better job at it the second time around, because I've my previous experience. Whew, lol, I hope I can still drive. I tend to think I'd be tripping over my own feet, getting back into it again. lol :) Anyway, it's always been something I remember being good at, and enjoyed doing. So, like I mentioned above, jumping one hurdle at a time, and taking one thing at a time.

And I also appreciate your reply, and your openness and honesty about your previous experiences.

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