Help Clarify Contract.

Topic 20934 | Page 1

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Justin W.'s Comment
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Hello Truckers!

Recently I was hired by a company and they sent me to school. I passed school with flying colors! Class A Obtained with airbrake and combinations. Next I do 2 weeks with a trainer and drove 7000 miles roughly. So begins my company test. First the obstacle course. Passed. Backing passed. Then the road test with safety guy. To keep it short I stopped at a red light (turning left) Light turned green. I pulled forward across white line into intersection. Waited for traffic to turn as to not offtrack in other lane. Light turned red. Had right to clear so i proceed to turn. Completed turn. (No ticket or actual violation) The safety gentleman said id ran a red light. And so i was let go for that. I thought that a bit extreme but ok your house your rules. Keeping it short thats my brief history.

I really want to continue truck driving. Im single, no kids, no property, no police record, or dui. I dont drink or smoke.

I just want to otr solo.

Since I was terminated am i still under contract? Im not sire how that works. I dont mind paying for the school but i need a job. I called the company and they would not give me a straight answer on details. Any suggestions on my situation? Im a little lost.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

DUI:

Driving Under the Influence

Big Scott's Comment
member avatar

Sorry to hear that. Was it CFI? If so, did they put you through training? They gave you a contract on day one. If you read that it should give you your answer. If you left on good terms, you will probably have to pay for the school. Another company, may give you a shot, however you may have to go through some schooling again. Have you asked the company if they would let you retest?

Old School's Comment
member avatar
Keeping it short thats my brief history.

It appears you kept it too short. Are you sure you didn't purposely leave out a few details? From your own description, it sounds as if you did run a red light. I'm not sure what you mean by this statement...

Light turned red. Had right to clear so i proceed to turn.

What do you mean that you "Had right to clear?"

Getting fired by a company that hires non experienced drivers for not passing your first road test sounds very suspect. Did you argue with the safety guy about it? If so, that may be where you messed up. Are you sure there isn't some pertinent information left out?

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

Technically, he definitely ran a red light. In a cmv , you're not allowed to take charge of an intersection which is exactly what he did by rolling across the line and waiting on traffic before proceeding. I don't know about various companies or even other states but for Indiana and Texas at least, if you did that during the license exam, it's an auto fail.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards
Justin W.'s Comment
member avatar

Yea sorry for not being more clear. I pulled up to the intersection to do a left turn. The light was red so I stopped. Then I got a green light so i moved forward into the intersection. I waited for cars to turn as they finished the light turned red. (Quick light) So i fimished my turn so i wasnt in the intersection.

https://www.springfieldmo.gov/426/Being-in-Control-of-the-Intersection

Dont see a mention of cmv on that site which was where i was. But if what you said is true then I did make that mistake Robert.

Anyways I am not mad or anything and no i did not argue with the inspector lol. I did ask for a retest which was a no go for them and I respect that.

I just told you so you understood my predicament. Im concerned about the future not what happened there. I cant stand lying so i have to explain all this somehow and still get hired by someone else.

I did get a hold of them finally and they said i wasnt under contract so that should make it easier.

I guess all i can do is try. Appreciate the input.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

From the Springfield Police page:

Left Turns at Intersections
Vehicles that legally enter a signalized intersection have the right to be there until they can safely clear the intersection. This is commonly referred to as being "in control of the intersection." This means if you are making a left turn at an intersection that has a solid green light for the turn lane and you are in the intersection before the light turns red, you are still required to yield to approaching vehicles, but you are allowed to make the turn in safety after the light turns red. You do not have to be out of the intersection before the light turns red.

Generally, once your vehicle is legally in an intersection, you must yield to other traffic as needed until you too can get out of the way, even after the green light goes red.

I don't understand your boo-boo. You legally entered the intersection on a green light. Then you waited (yielded} for other traffic to clear. (Which meant waiting for the green light to turn red.) Then you completed your turn "after the light turns red". I do this waiting game at left turns all the time, POV or 18 wheels. This is not a driver error or a broken law.

But, if the company decides to cut your contact, well, there's other companies that would like to talk to you. (Check your DAC report. Get was no police ticket issued.

(You may still owe tuition money, but your new company might take care of that, with a new contract for you.) Hey busy Applying For Truck Driving Jobs.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

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